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Top 25 Art Blog - Creative Tourist

An Interview with Daniel McNaboe

Portraiture Illustration, Bristol

Written by Sally Mumby-Croft

danielmacnaboe3

I’d like to start my interview with Daniel MacNaboe through an inquiry into the ideas, viagra order side effects views or politics that inspire his illustrations. Daniel is a graduate from the Illustration degree at the University of West England.

I’ve always been inspired by achieving some degree of realism in my artwork. Contemporary realist portraiture has been a continuing influence in the development of my work. I’m fascinated by the world around me. Both my mum and dad were always big on reading, cialis 40mg my dad would sit on the same patch of the sofa, reading the Guardian front to back for what seemed like hours each evening. His fascination with the world around him, simply his awareness of current affairs really intrigued me. I like to think he enlightened me to a lot of information. Always encouraging me not to take the things I have for granted.

Secondly I’m inspired by ordinary stories, I worked for a number of years during college and university holidays as a cleaner at the John Radcliffe hospital in Oxford. The job was a true life-experience. Not only the nature of the job itself, which consisted of working within sometimes distressing situations and environments. But also the people I got to know through working there. The cleaning staff comprised workers from all over the world, all with unique and amazing life stories that definitely affected the way in which I consequently look at the world. Their varying cultures, ideals, views really opened my eyes to a lot of things that in any other job I don’t think I would have been so fortunate as to experience. The many long hours I spent mopping floors, cleaning toilets and sitting on upturned mop buckets in cleaning cupboards chatting away with colleagues has continued to influence my thinking and motivations in regards to my artwork.

danielmacnaboe2

How do you decide which medium is best to represent your ideas?

I initially stick with what it is I know best, and from there let the ideas and aesthetics I’m exploring influence the mediums I use. I always begin with pencil and paper, and progress from there. I really enjoy printmaking, and spent a long time at University exploring hand-drawn and four-color photographic lithography techniques. I’m drawn to mediums, which complement my drawing, and general practical approach.

I allow the materials I use to help me form my ideas. I’ve always, for as long as I can remember been very much drawn to working with pencil and paper. It’s the simplicity of it that I get a kick from. I love rendering images onto the papers surface, in a similar way as to how I love watching a photograph develop in a dark room. I have a tendency to work slowly and methodically on each piece. I’ll never forget an art teacher telling me there are no lines in real life, and ever since have tried to avoid harsh, linear marks in my drawings when aiming towards realism. I tend to work softly and gently with my materials.

danielmacnaboethumb

What has been your favorite self directed illustration project?

The project I produced for my degree show at the University of the West of England. I chose to spend my last few months at university focusing on portraiture, this being a field I was keen to pursue after leaving University. Initially I was working through old family photographs for inspiration. I came across an image of my grandfather, a crisp military portrait of him in his first year as a U.S. Marine at age 18. What struck me was his youthfulness in the photograph. His innocence, and maybe naivety that was to be sadly short lived. It was interesting to me pondering that we were roughly at the same points in our lives, but under such different circumstances. Through consequent research I discovered he was deployed in the third wave of Marines onto the Japanese island of Iwo Jima on the 19th February 1945, and was incredibly lucky. Of the 340 U.S. Marines in his company only 17 of them, him included survived, many of them wounded. In one of my drawings for the project, I rendered from a photograph depicting my grandfather and a very good friend not long before they were both deployed to Iwo Jima. I learnt that his friend never made it off. On return to America after being disbanded he was awarded the Silver Star for gallantry in battle. In total 21,703 Japanese soldiers were killed on the island, and 6,825 U.S. Marines, with 29,909 American casualties over a 36-day period, a figure greater than the total Allied casualties on the D-Day landings. I decided to produce a series of images concerning his early life. From growing up as a young boy during the Great Depression in rural Illinois through to his time serving in the South Pacific during the Second World War. In a way the time I spent rendering these images allowed my to put my own life into some sort of perspective. What I seem to get most out of portraiture, whether it be portraits i’m working on myself or other peoples, is simply just gazing, trying to relate with the subject.
danielmacnaboe1

What was the thinking process behind the project?

Depsite living thousands of miles apart, I’ve always felt very close to my grandfather, and his experience during the war struck a chord with me. He is a quiet man, who is now 86 years old and very rarely mentioned his service. I was keen for the work to form a kind of homage to him. I guess the way I work is process based. I accumulate a collection of images that best convey what it is I want to express, and then begin rendering from them. As my work progresses it gives me more ideas as to how I would like to develop the work further. As I was working on the portraits of my grandfather I began to employ collage, Photoshop and printmaking to try and convey a particular aesthetic I thought was missing from the drawings. I loved the smokey aesthetic of the old black and white photographs I was studying, so I consequently decided to work with an assortment of soft-very soft graphite on smooth and thick off-white cartridge paper. I experimented with drawing in reverse with coloured conte pencils on black paper. Both techniques worked well. I also painted with Acrylic onto smoothly sanded gesso on Board. There were a couple images of the farmhouse my grandfather grew up in that I was keen to incorporate, and I felt the best way to represent this would be to move on to paint. Throughout the duration of the project I maintained a keen interest in the aesthetics of old documentation. I loved the qualities of the old military papers I was looking through.

danielmacnaboe2

I’d like to start my interview with Daniel MacNaboe through an inquiry into the ideas, viagra 100mg views or politics that inspire his illustrations. Daniel is a graduate from the Illustration degree at the University of West England.

I’ve always been inspired by achieving some degree of realism in my artwork. Contemporary realist portraiture has been a continuing influence in the development of my work. I’m fascinated by the world around me. Both my mum and dad were always big on reading, abortion my dad would sit on the same patch of the sofa, reading the Guardian front to back for what seemed like hours each evening. His fascination with the world around him, simply his awareness of current affairs really intrigued me. I like to think he enlightened me to a lot of information. Always encouraging me not to take the things I have for granted.

Secondly I’m inspired by ordinary stories, I worked for a number of years during college and university holidays as a cleaner at the John Radcliffe hospital in Oxford. The job was a true life-experience. Not only the nature of the job itself, which consisted of working within sometimes distressing situations and environments. But also the people I got to know through working there. The cleaning staff comprised workers from all over the world, all with unique and amazing life stories that definitely affected the way in which I consequently look at the world. Their varying cultures, ideals, views really opened my eyes to a lot of things that in any other job I don’t think I would have been so fortunate as to experience. The many long hours I spent mopping floors, cleaning toilets and sitting on upturned mop buckets in cleaning cupboards chatting away with colleagues has continued to influence my thinking and motivations in regards to my artwork.

danielmacnaboe3

How do you decide which medium is best to represent your ideas?

I initially stick with what it is I know best, and from there let the ideas and aesthetics I’m exploring influence the mediums I use. I always begin with pencil and paper, and progress from there. I really enjoy printmaking, and spent a long time at University exploring hand-drawn and four-color photographic lithography techniques. I’m drawn to mediums, which complement my drawing, and general practical approach.

I allow the materials I use to help me form my ideas. I’ve always, for as long as I can remember been very much drawn to working with pencil and paper. It’s the simplicity of it that I get a kick from. I love rendering images onto the papers surface, in a similar way as to how I love watching a photograph develop in a dark room. I have a tendency to work slowly and methodically on each piece. I’ll never forget an art teacher telling me there are no lines in real life, and ever since have tried to avoid harsh, linear marks in my drawings when aiming towards realism. I tend to work softly and gently with my materials.

danielmacnaboe

What has been your favorite self directed illustration project?

The project I produced for my degree show at the University of the West of England. I chose to spend my last few months at university focusing on portraiture, this being a field I was keen to pursue after leaving University. Initially I was working through old family photographs for inspiration. I came across an image of my grandfather, a crisp military portrait of him in his first year as a U.S. Marine at age 18. What struck me was his youthfulness in the photograph. His innocence, and maybe naivety that was to be sadly short lived. It was interesting to me pondering that we were roughly at the same points in our lives, but under such different circumstances. Through consequent research I discovered he was deployed in the third wave of Marines onto the Japanese island of Iwo Jima on the 19th February 1945, and was incredibly lucky. Of the 340 U.S. Marines in his company only 17 of them, him included survived, many of them wounded. In one of my drawings for the project, I rendered from a photograph depicting my grandfather and a very good friend not long before they were both deployed to Iwo Jima. I learnt that his friend never made it off. On return to America after being disbanded he was awarded the Silver Star for gallantry in battle. In total 21,703 Japanese soldiers were killed on the island, and 6,825 U.S. Marines, with 29,909 American casualties over a 36-day period, a figure greater than the total Allied casualties on the D-Day landings. I decided to produce a series of images concerning his early life. From growing up as a young boy during the Great Depression in rural Illinois through to his time serving in the South Pacific during the Second World War. In a way the time I spent rendering these images allowed my to put my own life into some sort of perspective. What I seem to get most out of portraiture, whether it be portraits i’m working on myself or other peoples, is simply just gazing, trying to relate with the subject.
danielmacnaboe1

What was the thinking process behind the project?

Depsite living thousands of miles apart, I’ve always felt very close to my grandfather, and his experience during the war struck a chord with me. He is a quiet man, who is now 86 years old and very rarely mentioned his service. I was keen for the work to form a kind of homage to him. I guess the way I work is process based. I accumulate a collection of images that best convey what it is I want to express, and then begin rendering from them. As my work progresses it gives me more ideas as to how I would like to develop the work further. As I was working on the portraits of my grandfather I began to employ collage, Photoshop and printmaking to try and convey a particular aesthetic I thought was missing from the drawings. I loved the smokey aesthetic of the old black and white photographs I was studying, so I consequently decided to work with an assortment of soft-very soft graphite on smooth and thick off-white cartridge paper. I experimented with drawing in reverse with coloured conte pencils on black paper. Both techniques worked well. I also painted with Acrylic onto smoothly sanded gesso on Board. There were a couple images of the farmhouse my grandfather grew up in that I was keen to incorporate, and I felt the best way to represent this would be to move on to paint. Throughout the duration of the project I maintained a keen interest in the aesthetics of old documentation. I loved the qualities of the old military papers I was looking through.

danielmacnaboe2

I’d like to start my interview with Daniel MacNaboe through an inquiry into the ideas, page views or politics that inspire his illustrations. Daniel is a graduate from the Illustration degree at the University of West England.

I’ve always been inspired by achieving some degree of realism in my artwork. Contemporary realist portraiture has been a continuing influence in the development of my work. I’m fascinated by the world around me. Both my mum and dad were always big on reading, page my dad would sit on the same patch of the sofa, reading the Guardian front to back for what seemed like hours each evening. His fascination with the world around him, simply his awareness of current affairs really intrigued me. I like to think he enlightened me to a lot of information. Always encouraging me not to take the things I have for granted.

Secondly I’m inspired by ordinary stories, I worked for a number of years during college and university holidays as a cleaner at the John Radcliffe hospital in Oxford. The job was a true life-experience. Not only the nature of the job itself, which consisted of working within sometimes distressing situations and environments. But also the people I got to know through working there. The cleaning staff comprised workers from all over the world, all with unique and amazing life stories that definitely affected the way in which I consequently look at the world. Their varying cultures, ideals, views really opened my eyes to a lot of things that in any other job I don’t think I would have been so fortunate as to experience. The many long hours I spent mopping floors, cleaning toilets and sitting on upturned mop buckets in cleaning cupboards chatting away with colleagues has continued to influence my thinking and motivations in regards to my artwork.

danielmacnaboe3

How do you decide which medium is best to represent your ideas?

I initially stick with what it is I know best, and from there let the ideas and aesthetics I’m exploring influence the mediums I use. I always begin with pencil and paper, and progress from there. I really enjoy printmaking, and spent a long time at University exploring hand-drawn and four-color photographic lithography techniques. I’m drawn to mediums, which complement my drawing, and general practical approach.

I allow the materials I use to help me form my ideas. I’ve always, for as long as I can remember been very much drawn to working with pencil and paper. It’s the simplicity of it that I get a kick from. I love rendering images onto the papers surface, in a similar way as to how I love watching a photograph develop in a dark room. I have a tendency to work slowly and methodically on each piece. I’ll never forget an art teacher telling me there are no lines in real life, and ever since have tried to avoid harsh, linear marks in my drawings when aiming towards realism. I tend to work softly and gently with my materials.

danielmacnaboe

What has been your favorite self directed illustration project?

The project I produced for my degree show at the University of the West of England. I chose to spend my last few months at university focusing on portraiture, this being a field I was keen to pursue after leaving University. Initially I was working through old family photographs for inspiration. I came across an image of my grandfather, a crisp military portrait of him in his first year as a U.S. Marine at age 18. What struck me was his youthfulness in the photograph. His innocence, and maybe naivety that was to be sadly short lived. It was interesting to me pondering that we were roughly at the same points in our lives, but under such different circumstances. Through consequent research I discovered he was deployed in the third wave of Marines onto the Japanese island of Iwo Jima on the 19th February 1945, and was incredibly lucky. Of the 340 U.S. Marines in his company only 17 of them, him included survived, many of them wounded. In one of my drawings for the project, I rendered from a photograph depicting my grandfather and a very good friend not long before they were both deployed to Iwo Jima. I learnt that his friend never made it off. On return to America after being disbanded he was awarded the Silver Star for gallantry in battle. In total 21,703 Japanese soldiers were killed on the island, and 6,825 U.S. Marines, with 29,909 American casualties over a 36-day period, a figure greater than the total Allied casualties on the D-Day landings. I decided to produce a series of images concerning his early life. From growing up as a young boy during the Great Depression in rural Illinois through to his time serving in the South Pacific during the Second World War. In a way the time I spent rendering these images allowed my to put my own life into some sort of perspective. What I seem to get most out of portraiture, whether it be portraits i’m working on myself or other peoples, is simply just gazing, trying to relate with the subject.
danielmacnaboe1

What was the thinking process behind the project?

Depsite living thousands of miles apart, I’ve always felt very close to my grandfather, and his experience during the war struck a chord with me. He is a quiet man, who is now 86 years old and very rarely mentioned his service. I was keen for the work to form a kind of homage to him. I guess the way I work is process based. I accumulate a collection of images that best convey what it is I want to express, and then begin rendering from them. As my work progresses it gives me more ideas as to how I would like to develop the work further. As I was working on the portraits of my grandfather I began to employ collage, Photoshop and printmaking to try and convey a particular aesthetic I thought was missing from the drawings. I loved the smokey aesthetic of the old black and white photographs I was studying, so I consequently decided to work with an assortment of soft-very soft graphite on smooth and thick off-white cartridge paper. I experimented with drawing in reverse with coloured conte pencils on black paper. Both techniques worked well. I also painted with Acrylic onto smoothly sanded gesso on Board. There were a couple images of the farmhouse my grandfather grew up in that I was keen to incorporate, and I felt the best way to represent this would be to move on to paint. Throughout the duration of the project I maintained a keen interest in the aesthetics of old documentation. I loved the qualities of the old military papers I was looking through.

Yesterday Bloom In Bloomsbury was held in Torrington Square in SOAS, stuff the gathering was held to get people involved and engaged with the Climate Change problem. Luckily it was held under a big marquee as we were subjected to a few downpours throughout the day.

BL

There was a Stall to get people involved with The Great Climate Swoop, viagra dosage the direct action to shut down Ratcliffe On Soar Coal Power station in 10 days time, doctor Outreach also got people signed up to transport to get down to Nottingham, which is going from all across the country at activist cut prices.

bl1

One of the aims was to also get people involved in the run up to Cop 15 in December where world leaders will meet in a ‘last chance’ conference to tackle Climate Change in Copenhagen. A people’s summit is being held on the 16th of December in the conference to show that we are not willing to let government agenda govern the proceedings, and that as a social movement we need to take a stand. Again Transport from across the country will be going and coaches are being booked right now to ensure we can all get there. Climate Justice Action. is an umbrella organisation that encompasses a broad range of activist and organisations that will have a range of details and contacts for the climatic event.

Bl2

A stall highlighting the problem of Agrofuels was also providing information to passers by, bio fuels are linked to accelerated climate change, deforestation, human rights abuses, water and soil degradation, and are still labeled by many NGO’s and government as an answer to conventional oil practice. There is ademonstration outside The Department for Energy and Climate Change in London on Monday the 12th to protest against the so-called ‘green energy’ Subsidies.

Bl3

There was also the SOAS food Co-op, which provides wholesale food and is run as a non-profit group set up by students. The bike maintenance workshop put on was also really popular. If you missed the event make sure you get down to Powershift being held over the weekend at the Institute of Education in London.

As the event wound down and we were outreached out, a group headed to the City University as a certain energy company, E.ON, were holding a talk at the student recruitment fair. The company is responsible for the planned new coal power stations at Kingsnorth, which combined would produce the same carbon emissions as Ghana. With the report by the Global and Humanitarian forum stating that three hundred thousand people are already dyeing already each year due to climate change, it isn’t a viable option.

Bl4

The group of activists stormed the talks, getting past the security guards who were holding a pretty tight presence outside the doors, quite possibly due to the continued protests against E.ON at student fairs last year.
While 3 burly guys jumped on one activist, the others handed out flyers to the bemused students woken up from the corporate PowerPoint slumber. An activist took to the podium to tell the audience what E.ON are really about, claiming themselves as a Green Energy Company while 95% of their investment is into non renewable energies is a clear sign of greenwashing and the corporate bullshit that students have to listen to.
Yesterday Bloom In Bloomsbury was held in Torrington Square in SOAS. The gathering was held to get people involved and engaged with the Climate Change problem. Luckily it was held under a big marquee as we were subjected to a few downpours throughout the day.

BL

There was a stall to get people involved with The Great Climate Swoop, buy the direct action to shut down Ratcliffe On Soar oal power station in 10 days time. Outreach also got people signed up to provide transport down to Nottingham, which is going from all across the country at special activist prices.

bl1

One of the aims was to also get people involved in the run up to Cop 15 in December where world leaders will meet in a ‘last chance’ conference to tackle Climate Change in Copenhagen. A people’s summit is being held on the 16th of December in the conference to show that we are not willing to let a government agenda govern the proceedings, and that as a social movement we need to take a stand. Again, transport from across the country will be going and coaches are being booked right now to ensure we can all get there. Climate Justice Action is an umbrella organisation that encompasses a broad range of activist organisations that will have a range of details and contacts for the event.

Bl2

A stall highlighting the problem of Agrofuels was also providing information to passers by, bio fuels are linked to accelerated climate change, deforestation, human rights abuses, water and soil degradation, and are still labeled by many NGO’s and government as an answer to conventional oil practice. There is ademonstration outside The Department for Energy and Climate Change in London on Monday the 12th to protest against the so-called ‘green energy’ subsidies.

Bl3

There was also the SOAS food co-op, which provides wholesale food and is run as a non-profit group set up by students. The bike maintenance workshop put on was also really popular. If you missed the event make sure you get down to Powershift being held over the weekend at the Institute of Education in London.

As the event wound down and we were outreached out, a group headed to the City University as a certain energy company, E.ON, were holding a talk at the student recruitment fair. The company is responsible for the planned new coal power stations at Kingsnorth, which combined would produce the same carbon emissions as Ghana. With the report by the Global and Humanitarian forum stating that three hundred thousand people are already dying already each year due to climate change, it isn’t a viable option.

Bl4

The group of activists stormed the talks, getting past the security guards who were holding a pretty tight presence outside the doors, quite possibly due to the continued protests against E.ON at student fairs last year.
While three burly guys jumped on one activist, the others handed out flyers to the bemused students woken up from the corporate PowerPoint slumber. An activist took to the podium to tell the audience what E.ON are really about. Claiming themselves as a Green Energy Company while 95% of their investment is into non renewable energies is a clear sign of greenwashing and the corporate bullshit that students have to listen to.
Yesterday Bloom In Bloomsbury was held in Torrington Square in SOAS. The gathering was held to get people involved and engaged with the Climate Change problem. Luckily it was held under a big marquee as we were subjected to a few downpours throughout the day.

BL

There was a stall to get people involved with The Great Climate Swoop, page the direct action to shut down Ratcliffe On Soar oal power station in 10 days time. Outreach also got people signed up to provide transport down to Nottingham, salve which is going from all across the country at special activist prices.

bl1

One of the aims was to also get people involved in the run up to Cop 15 in December where world leaders will meet in a ‘last chance’ conference to tackle Climate Change in Copenhagen. A people’s summit is being held on the 16th of December in the conference to show that we are not willing to let a government agenda govern the proceedings, and that as a social movement we need to take a stand. Again, transport from across the country will be going and coaches are being booked right now to ensure we can all get there. Climate Justice Action is an umbrella organisation that encompasses a broad range of activist organisations that will have a range of details and contacts for the event.

Bl2

A stall highlighting the problem of Agrofuels was also providing information to passers by, bio fuels are linked to accelerated climate change, deforestation, human rights abuses, water and soil degradation, and are still labeled by many NGO’s and government as an answer to conventional oil practice. There is ademonstration outside The Department for Energy and Climate Change in London on Monday the 12th to protest against the so-called ‘green energy’ subsidies.

Bl3

There was also the SOAS food co-op, which provides wholesale food and is run as a non-profit group set up by students. The bike maintenance workshop put on was also really popular. If you missed the event make sure you get down to Powershift being held over the weekend at the Institute of Education in London.

As the event wound down and we were outreached out, a group headed to the City University as a certain energy company, E.ON, were holding a talk at the student recruitment fair. The company is responsible for the planned new coal power stations at Kingsnorth, which combined would produce the same carbon emissions as Ghana. With the report by the Global and Humanitarian forum stating that three hundred thousand people are already dying already each year due to climate change, it isn’t a viable option.

Bl4

The group of activists stormed the talks, getting past the security guards who were holding a pretty tight presence outside the doors, quite possibly due to the continued protests against E.ON at student fairs last year.
While three burly guys jumped on one activist, the others handed out flyers to the bemused students woken up from the corporate PowerPoint slumber. An activist took to the podium to tell the audience what E.ON are really about. Claiming themselves as a Green Energy Company while 95% of their investment is into non renewable energies is a clear sign of greenwashing and the corporate bullshit that students have to listen to.
Yesterday Bloom In Bloomsbury was held in Torrington Square in SOAS. The gathering was held to get people involved and engaged with the Climate Change problem. Luckily it was held under a big marquee as we were subjected to a few downpours throughout the day.

BL

There was a stall to get people involved with The Great Climate Swoop, thumb the direct action to shut down Ratcliffe On Soar oal power station in 10 days time. Outreach also got people signed up to provide transport down to Nottingham, abortion which is going from all across the country at special activist prices.

bl1

One of the aims was to also get people involved in the run up to Cop 15 in December where world leaders will meet in a ‘last chance’ conference to tackle Climate Change in Copenhagen. A people’s summit is being held on the 16th of December in the conference to show that we are not willing to let a government agenda govern the proceedings, and that as a social movement we need to take a stand. Again, transport from across the country will be going and coaches are being booked right now to ensure we can all get there. Climate Justice Action is an umbrella organisation that encompasses a broad range of activist organisations that will have a range of details and contacts for the event.

Bl2

A stall highlighting the problem of Agrofuels was also providing information to passers by, bio fuels are linked to accelerated climate change, deforestation, human rights abuses, water and soil degradation, and are still labeled by many NGO’s and government as an answer to conventional oil practice. There is ademonstration outside The Department for Energy and Climate Change in London on Monday the 12th to protest against the so-called ‘green energy’ subsidies.

Bl3

There was also the SOAS food co-op, which provides wholesale food and is run as a non-profit group set up by students. The bike maintenance workshop put on was also really popular. If you missed the event make sure you get down to Powershift being held over the weekend at the Institute of Education in London.

As the event wound down and we were outreached out, a group headed to the City University as a certain energy company, E.ON, were holding a talk at the student recruitment fair. The company is responsible for the planned new coal power stations at Kingsnorth, which combined would produce the same carbon emissions as Ghana. With the report by the Global and Humanitarian forum stating that three hundred thousand people are already dying already each year due to climate change, it isn’t a viable option.

Bl4

The group of activists stormed the talks, getting past the security guards who were holding a pretty tight presence outside the doors, quite possibly due to the continued protests against E.ON at student fairs last year.
While three burly guys jumped on one activist, the others handed out flyers to the bemused students woken up from the corporate PowerPoint slumber. An activist took to the podium to tell the audience what E.ON are really about. Claiming themselves as a Green Energy Company while 95% of their investment is into non renewable energies is a clear sign of greenwashing and the corporate bullshit that students have to listen to.
Yesterday Bloom In Bloomsbury was held in Torrington Square in SOAS. The gathering was held to get people involved and engaged with the Climate Change problem. Luckily it was held under a big marquee as we were subjected to a few downpours throughout the day.

BL

There was a stall to get people involved with The Great Climate Swoop, cialis 40mg the direct action to shut down Ratcliffe On Soar oal power station in 10 days time. Outreach also got people signed up to provide transport down to Nottingham, which is going from all across the country at special activist prices.

bl1

One of the aims was to also get people involved in the run up to Cop 15 in December where world leaders will meet in a ‘last chance’ conference to tackle Climate Change in Copenhagen. A people’s summit is being held on the 16th of December in the conference to show that we are not willing to let a government agenda govern the proceedings, and that as a social movement we need to take a stand. Again, transport from across the country will be going and coaches are being booked right now to ensure we can all get there. Climate Justice Action is an umbrella organisation that encompasses a broad range of activist organisations that will have a range of details and contacts for the event.

Bl2

A stall highlighting the problem of Agrofuels was also providing information to passers by, bio fuels are linked to accelerated climate change, deforestation, human rights abuses, water and soil degradation, and are still labeled by many NGO’s and government as an answer to conventional oil practice. There is ademonstration outside The Department for Energy and Climate Change in London on Monday the 12th to protest against the so-called ‘green energy’ subsidies.

Bl3

There was also the SOAS food co-op, which provides wholesale food and is run as a non-profit group set up by students. The bike maintenance workshop put on was also really popular. If you missed the event make sure you get down to Powershift being held over the weekend at the Institute of Education in London.

As the event wound down and we were outreached out, a group headed to the City University as a certain energy company, E.ON, were holding a talk at the student recruitment fair. The company is responsible for the planned new coal power stations at Kingsnorth, which combined would produce the same carbon emissions as Ghana. With the report by the Global and Humanitarian forum stating that three hundred thousand people are already dying already each year due to climate change, it isn’t a viable option.

Bl4

The group of activists stormed the talks, getting past the security guards who were holding a pretty tight presence outside the doors, quite possibly due to the continued protests against E.ON at student fairs last year.
While three burly guys jumped on one activist, the others handed out flyers to the bemused students woken up from the corporate PowerPoint slumber. An activist took to the podium to tell the audience what E.ON are really about. Claiming themselves as a Green Energy Company while 95% of their investment is into non renewable energies is a clear sign of greenwashing and the corporate bullshit that students have to listen to.
Yesterday Bloom In Bloomsbury was held in Torrington Square in SOAS. The gathering was held to get people involved and engaged with the Climate Change problem. Luckily it was held under a big marquee as we were subjected to a few downpours throughout the day.

BL

There was a stall to get people involved with The Great Climate Swoop, order the direct action to shut down Ratcliffe On Soar oal power station in 10 days time. Outreach also got people signed up to provide transport down to Nottingham, case which is going from all across the country at special activist prices.

bl1

One of the aims was to also get people involved in the run up to Cop 15 in December where world leaders will meet in a ‘last chance’ conference to tackle Climate Change in Copenhagen. A people’s summit is being held on the 16th of December in the conference to show that we are not willing to let a government agenda govern the proceedings, cure and that as a social movement we need to take a stand. Again, transport from across the country will be going and coaches are being booked right now to ensure we can all get there. Climate Justice Action is an umbrella organisation that encompasses a broad range of activist organisations that will have a range of details and contacts for the event.

Bl2

A stall highlighting the problem of Agrofuels was also providing information to passers by, bio fuels are linked to accelerated climate change, deforestation, human rights abuses, water and soil degradation, and are still labeled by many NGO’s and government as an answer to conventional oil practice. There is ademonstration outside The Department for Energy and Climate Change in London on Monday the 12th to protest against the so-called ‘green energy’ subsidies.

Bl3

There was also the SOAS food co-op, which provides wholesale food and is run as a non-profit group set up by students. The bike maintenance workshop put on was also really popular. If you missed the event make sure you get down to Powershift being held over the weekend at the Institute of Education in London.

As the event wound down and we were outreached out, a group headed to the City University as a certain energy company, E.ON, were holding a talk at the student recruitment fair. The company is responsible for the planned new coal power stations at Kingsnorth, which combined would produce the same carbon emissions as Ghana. With the report by the Global and Humanitarian forum stating that three hundred thousand people are already dying already each year due to climate change, it isn’t a viable option.

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The group of activists stormed the talks, getting past the security guards who were holding a pretty tight presence outside the doors, quite possibly due to the continued protests against E.ON at student fairs last year.
While three burly guys jumped on one activist, the others handed out flyers to the bemused students woken up from the corporate PowerPoint slumber. An activist took to the podium to tell the audience what E.ON are really about. Claiming themselves as a Green Energy Company while 95% of their investment is into non renewable energies is a clear sign of greenwashing and the corporate bullshit that students have to listen to.
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I’d like to start the interview with Daniel McNaboe by inquiring into the ideas, symptoms views or politics that inspire his illustrations. Daniel is a graduate from the Illustration degree at the University of West England.

I’ve always been inspired by achieving some degree of realism in my artwork. Contemporary realist portraiture has been a continuing influence in the development of my work. I’m fascinated by the world around me. Both my mum and dad were always big on reading, advice my dad would sit on the same patch of the sofa, reading the Guardian front to back for what seemed like hours each evening. His fascination with the world around him, simply his awareness of current affairs really intrigued me. I like to think he enlightened me to a lot of information. Always encouraging me not to take the things I have for granted.

Secondly I’m inspired by ordinary stories, I worked for a number of years during college and university holidays as a cleaner at the John Radcliffe hospital in Oxford. The job was a true life-experience. Not only the nature of the job itself, which consisted of working within sometimes distressing situations and environments. But also the people I got to know through working there. The cleaning staff comprised workers from all over the world, all with unique and amazing life stories that definitely affected the way in which I consequently look at the world. Their varying cultures, ideals, views really opened my eyes to a lot of things that in any other job I don’t think I would have been so fortunate as to experience. The many long hours I spent mopping floors, cleaning toilets and sitting on upturned mop buckets in cleaning cupboards chatting away with colleagues has continued to influence my thinking and motivations in regards to my artwork.

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How do you decide which medium is best to represent your ideas?

I initially stick with what it is I know best, and from there let the ideas and aesthetics I’m exploring influence the mediums I use. I always begin with pencil and paper, and progress from there. I really enjoy printmaking, and spent a long time at University exploring hand-drawn and four-color photographic lithography techniques. I’m drawn to mediums, which complement my drawing, and general practical approach.

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I allow the materials I use to help me form my ideas. I’ve always, for as long as I can remember been very much drawn to working with pencil and paper. It’s the simplicity of it that I get a kick from. I love rendering images onto the papers surface, in a similar way as to how I love watching a photograph develop in a dark room. I have a tendency to work slowly and methodically on each piece. I’ll never forget an art teacher telling me there are no lines in real life, and ever since have tried to avoid harsh, linear marks in my drawings when aiming towards realism. I tend to work softly and gently with my materials.

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What has been your favorite self directed illustration project?

The project I produced for my degree show at the University of the West of England. I chose to spend my last few months at university focusing on portraiture, this being a field I was keen to pursue after leaving University. Initially I was working through old family photographs for inspiration. I came across an image of my grandfather, a crisp military portrait of him in his first year as a U.S. Marine at age 18. What struck me was his youthfulness in the photograph. His innocence, and maybe naivety that was to be sadly short lived. It was interesting to me pondering that we were roughly at the same points in our lives, but under such different circumstances.

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Through consequent research I discovered he was deployed in the third wave of Marines onto the Japanese island of Iwo Jima on the 19th February 1945, and was incredibly lucky. Of the 340 U.S. Marines in his company only 17 of them, him included survived, many of them wounded. In one of my drawings for the project, I rendered a photograph depicting my grandfather and a very good friend not long before they were deployed to Iwo Jima. I later learnt that his friend never made it off.

On return to America My grandfather was awarded the Silver Star for gallantry in battle. In total 21,703 Japanese soldiers were killed on the island, and 6,825 U.S. Marines, with 29,909 American casualties over a 36-day period, a figure greater than the total Allied casualties on the D-Day landings.

I decided to produce a series of images concerning his early life. From growing up as a young boy during the Great Depression in rural Illinois through to his time serving in the South Pacific during the Second World War. The time I spent rendering these images allowed me to put my own life into some sort of perspective.

What I seem to get most out of portraiture, whether it be portraits i’m working on myself or other peoples, is simply just gazing, trying to relate with the subject.

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What was the thinking process behind the project?

Depsite living thousands of miles apart, I’ve always felt very close to my grandfather, and his experience during the war struck a chord with me. He is a quiet man, who is now 86 years old and very rarely mentioned his service. I was keen for the work to form a kind of homage to him.

I guess the way I work is process based. I accumulate a collection of images that best convey what it is I want to express, and then begin rendering from them. As work progresses it gives me more ideas as to how I would like to develop further. As I was working on the portraits of my grandfather I began to employ collage, Photoshop and printmaking to try and convey a particular aesthetic I thought was missing from the drawings. I loved the smokey aesthetic of the old black and white photographs I was studying, so I consequently decided to work with an assortment of soft-very soft graphite on smooth and thick off-white
cartridge paper.

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I experimented with drawing in reverse with coloured conte pencils on black paper. Both techniques worked well. I also painted with Acrylic onto smoothly sanded gesso on Board. There were a couple images of the farmhouse my grandfather grew up in that I was keen to incorporate, and I felt the best way to represent this would be to move on to paint.

Throughout the duration of the project I maintained a keen interest in the aesthetics of old documentation. I loved the qualities of the old military papers I was looking through.

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