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Top 25 Art Blog - Creative Tourist

Dreamboat Exhibition – Four Interviews with Four Illustrators

Interviews with artists featuring at the Dreamboat Vs Inkygoodness Exhibition in Bristol. Ben Steers, Dave Bain, Leila Shetty and Sarah Dennis discuss dreamboats, backgrounds and the influence of music on art

Written by Helen Martin


Illustration by Abigail Wright

I have always been fascinated with analogue photo booths. I have vivd memories as a child – the excitement and anticipation, visit this pulling ridiculous faces, never really knowing what you’ll get until the old machines clunk and churn out your photographs. So, on a recent trip to Berlin, I was desperate to get back involved, like so many others, with the analogue phenomenon.

A short while after my return, I discovered that the Photoautomat project that exists in Berlin had transferred to London – one of those brightly coloured, glorious booths had been on my own doorstep and I didn’t even realise. A bit of internet research, a blog and a Twitter account later, I met Alex – Photoautomat’s London representative. He’s on a mission to bring back the beauty and art of the old-fashioned photo booth. Me, Amelia and fashion writers Sally and Jemma paid Alex a visit on a crisp Saturday morning to get involved, and have a chat with the man himself…

How did the Photoautomat project start, and where did the booths come from?
Well, it really started about 5 years ago in Germany, where my friends bought one of the booths because they were fascinated with the old analogue machines and the photos they produce. Soon it took over Berlin and the rest of the country. I got interested in the booth when I was over visiting and followed my friends around to look after the booths. We all have our memories from when we were young and fooling around in those booths at the Mall, but seeing them again in Berlin really ignited my passion for them again.

What do you know about the history of the booths?
The photo booth was invented 1925 by a Russian immigrant in New York. He opened his Photomaton Studio on Broadway. For just 25 cents, everybody could get their photograph taken. That was quite a revolution back then as photography was just for the rich and famous; because of the booths, it became accessible to everybody. 
From then on they were used as props in movies such as Band Wagon with Fred Astaire, by artists like Andy Warhol and people from all backgrounds for fun or memories and obviously passport photos.

Where are the booths located now?
Our booths are all over Germany. Most of them are in Berlin, but also in Hamburg, Dresden and Cologne. We launched a booth a while ago in Vienna. Then there is my booth here in London. There are also booths in Paris and Italy. 

How did this one end up in Cargo?
I thought it would be much easier to get a good location for a photo booth in London, but it turned out to be more difficult than I thought - policies and regulations mean a seemingly straightforward thing as installing a photo booth quite a task. I approached Cargo and they gave me the space in their beer garden straight away; they just liked the idea and it was done.

Photoautomat Cargo. Photograph by Matt Bramford

Why do you think the booths are so popular?
Well, people always like old things: vintage, analogue. The rebirth of Polaroid showed there is still a demand for analogue photography.There is something precious about a photo booth strip. It’s one moment, one photo and it can’t be replicated. No negative, no back up, just like real life. The photos also have a better quality than digital ones. There are apps out there on smart-phones to imitate the effect and I understand that most people don’t want to go through the hassle of having a analogue camera. This is where the photo booths come in. For a few quid, you can take your photo booth strip with your friends and keep that moment forever.

How do you think the qualities of these booths compare to the modern booths we see in train stations/etc?
I guess I answered that question above, but there really is no comparison. The digital ones lack quality and depth and the spontaneity you have in the analogue booth. 

Are there any other London locations planned? Or elsewhere in Europe?
I am looking for more locations in London. I would love to get some booths on the Southbank.

Has the booth been used for anything other than people taking pictures with their mates?
I had a photo shoot last year with Mixmag in the booth. It was a fashion special with hats. There were also a few artists who used the booth for their projects. Fionna Banner used the booth for her work twice.


Photoautomat Berlin. Photograph by Matt Bramford

Have you seen/heard any funny experiences concerning the photo booth that you can share?
I had a guy calling me once – he was totally out of it. He took some photos with his girlfriend and they didn’t came out. She got naked and they were concerned that they might get into the wrong hands. I wasn’t in town at that time and couldn’t do anything about it, but he insisted for me to come around. I finally managed to calm him down and sort everything out. 

Photos from our Twitter friends: @vikkeh, @mattbramf (me!), @c_rl, @deeandrews, @lizzlizz, @chaiwalla, @sallymumbycroft

What are you favourite images that the booth has created?
That would have to be all the photos form the exhibition/project we had during Photomonth last year. They reflect what the whole photo booth thing is all about.

Who would be your ideal customer – who would you most like to see use the booth?
Everybody is ideal. Everybody is welcome, as long as they respect our work and leave the booth as they found it for the next to come! Most likely they are probably analogue enthusiasts, students and Cargo guests. I have families, a couple from Lisbon, artists form Nottingham and even Henry Holland taking their photo in the booth!

A Photoautomat booth in Berlin, photographed by Lizz Lunney

What does the Photoautomat project hope to achieve, long term?
Hopefully we’re here for years to come and give people from all backgrounds the opportunity to have their little moment. It’s really all up to the people who use our booths and what they make of it. That is the beauty about it – and always will be.

See more pictures from the booths on the Photoautomat Facebook and Flickr pages.


Illustration by Abigail Wright

I have always been fascinated with analogue photo booths. I have vivd memories as a child – the excitement and anticipation, viagra sale pulling ridiculous faces, never really knowing what you’ll get until the old machines clunk and churn out your photographs. So, on a recent trip to Berlin, I was desperate to get back involved, like so many others, with the analogue phenomenon.

A short while after my return, I discovered that the Photoautomat project that exists in Berlin had transferred to London – one of those brightly coloured, glorious booths had been on my own doorstep and I didn’t even realise. A bit of internet research, a blog and a Twitter account later, I met Alex – Photoautomat’s London representative. He’s on a mission to bring back the beauty and art of the old-fashioned photo booth. Me, Amelia and fashion writers Sally and Jemma paid Alex a visit on a crisp Saturday morning to get involved, and have a chat with the man himself…

How did the Photoautomat project start, and where did the booths come from?
Well, it really started about 5 years ago in Germany, where my friends bought one of the booths because they were fascinated with the old analogue machines and the photos they produce. Soon it took over Berlin and the rest of the country. I got interested in the booth when I was over visiting and followed my friends around to look after the booths. We all have our memories from when we were young and fooling around in those booths at the Mall, but seeing them again in Berlin really ignited my passion for them again.

What do you know about the history of the booths?
The photo booth was invented 1925 by a Russian immigrant in New York. He opened his Photomaton Studio on Broadway. For just 25 cents, everybody could get their photograph taken. That was quite a revolution back then as photography was just for the rich and famous; because of the booths, it became accessible to everybody. 
From then on they were used as props in movies such as Band Wagon with Fred Astaire, by artists like Andy Warhol and people from all backgrounds for fun or memories and obviously passport photos.

Where are the booths located now?
Our booths are all over Germany. Most of them are in Berlin, but also in Hamburg, Dresden and Cologne. We launched a booth a while ago in Vienna. Then there is my booth here in London. There are also booths in Paris and Italy. 

How did this one end up in Cargo?
I thought it would be much easier to get a good location for a photo booth in London, but it turned out to be more difficult than I thought - policies and regulations mean a seemingly straightforward thing as installing a photo booth quite a task. I approached Cargo and they gave me the space in their beer garden straight away; they just liked the idea and it was done.

Photoautomat Cargo. Photograph by Matt Bramford

Why do you think the booths are so popular?
Well, people always like old things: vintage, analogue. The rebirth of Polaroid showed there is still a demand for analogue photography.There is something precious about a photo booth strip. It’s one moment, one photo and it can’t be replicated. No negative, no back up, just like real life. The photos also have a better quality than digital ones. There are apps out there on smart-phones to imitate the effect and I understand that most people don’t want to go through the hassle of having a analogue camera. This is where the photo booths come in. For a few quid, you can take your photo booth strip with your friends and keep that moment forever.

How do you think the qualities of these booths compare to the modern booths we see in train stations/etc?
I guess I answered that question above, but there really is no comparison. The digital ones lack quality and depth and the spontaneity you have in the analogue booth. 

Are there any other London locations planned? Or elsewhere in Europe?
I am looking for more locations in London. I would love to get some booths on the Southbank.

Has the booth been used for anything other than people taking pictures with their mates?
I had a photo shoot last year with Mixmag in the booth. It was a fashion special with hats. There were also a few artists who used the booth for their projects. Fionna Banner used the booth for her work twice.


Photoautomat Berlin. Photograph by Matt Bramford

Have you seen/heard any funny experiences concerning the photo booth that you can share?
I had a guy calling me once – he was totally out of it. He took some photos with his girlfriend and they didn’t came out. She got naked and they were concerned that they might get into the wrong hands. I wasn’t in town at that time and couldn’t do anything about it, but he insisted for me to come around. I finally managed to calm him down and sort everything out. 

Photos from our Twitter friends: @vikkeh, @mattbramf (me!), @c_rl, @deeandrews, @lizzlizz, @chaiwalla, @sallymumbycroft

What are you favourite images that the booth has created?
That would have to be all the photos form the exhibition/project we had during Photomonth last year. They reflect what the whole photo booth thing is all about.

Who would be your ideal customer – who would you most like to see use the booth?
Everybody is ideal. Everybody is welcome, as long as they respect our work and leave the booth as they found it for the next to come! Most likely they are probably analogue enthusiasts, students and Cargo guests. I have families, a couple from Lisbon, artists form Nottingham and even Henry Holland taking their photo in the booth!

A Photoautomat booth in Berlin, photographed by Lizz Lunney

What does the Photoautomat project hope to achieve, long term?
Hopefully we’re here for years to come and give people from all backgrounds the opportunity to have their little moment. It’s really all up to the people who use our booths and what they make of it. That is the beauty about it – and always will be.

See more pictures from the booths on the Photoautomat Facebook and Flickr pages.


Illustration by Abigail Wright

I have always been fascinated with analogue photo booths. I have vivd memories as a child – the excitement and anticipation, adiposity pulling ridiculous faces, healing never really knowing what you’ll get until the old machines clunk and churn out your photographs. So, order on a recent trip to Berlin, I was desperate to get back involved, like so many others, with the analogue phenomenon.

A short while after my return, I discovered that the Photoautomat project that exists in Berlin had transferred to London – one of those brightly coloured, glorious booths had been on my own doorstep and I didn’t even realise. A bit of internet research, a blog and a Twitter account later, I met Alex – Photoautomat’s London representative. He’s on a mission to bring back the beauty and art of the old-fashioned photo booth. Me, Amelia and fashion writers Sally and Jemma paid Alex a visit on a crisp Saturday morning to get involved, and have a chat with the man himself…

How did the Photoautomat project start, and where did the booths come from?
Well, it really started about 5 years ago in Germany, where my friends bought one of the booths because they were fascinated with the old analogue machines and the photos they produce. Soon it took over Berlin and the rest of the country. I got interested in the booth when I was over visiting and followed my friends around to look after the booths. We all have our memories from when we were young and fooling around in those booths at the Mall, but seeing them again in Berlin really ignited my passion for them again.

What do you know about the history of the booths?
The photo booth was invented 1925 by a Russian immigrant in New York. He opened his Photomaton Studio on Broadway. For just 25 cents, everybody could get their photograph taken. That was quite a revolution back then as photography was just for the rich and famous; because of the booths, it became accessible to everybody. 
From then on they were used as props in movies such as Band Wagon with Fred Astaire, by artists like Andy Warhol and people from all backgrounds for fun or memories and obviously passport photos.

Where are the booths located now?
Our booths are all over Germany. Most of them are in Berlin, but also in Hamburg, Dresden and Cologne. We launched a booth a while ago in Vienna. Then there is my booth here in London. There are also booths in Paris and Italy. 

How did this one end up in Cargo?
I thought it would be much easier to get a good location for a photo booth in London, but it turned out to be more difficult than I thought - policies and regulations mean a seemingly straightforward thing as installing a photo booth quite a task. I approached Cargo and they gave me the space in their beer garden straight away; they just liked the idea and it was done.

Photoautomat Cargo. Photograph by Matt Bramford

Why do you think the booths are so popular?
Well, people always like old things: vintage, analogue. The rebirth of Polaroid showed there is still a demand for analogue photography.There is something precious about a photo booth strip. It’s one moment, one photo and it can’t be replicated. No negative, no back up, just like real life. The photos also have a better quality than digital ones. There are apps out there on smart-phones to imitate the effect and I understand that most people don’t want to go through the hassle of having a analogue camera. This is where the photo booths come in. For a few quid, you can take your photo booth strip with your friends and keep that moment forever.

How do you think the qualities of these booths compare to the modern booths we see in train stations/etc?
I guess I answered that question above, but there really is no comparison. The digital ones lack quality and depth and the spontaneity you have in the analogue booth. 

Are there any other London locations planned? Or elsewhere in Europe?
I am looking for more locations in London. I would love to get some booths on the Southbank.

Has the booth been used for anything other than people taking pictures with their mates?
I had a photo shoot last year with Mixmag in the booth. It was a fashion special with hats. There were also a few artists who used the booth for their projects. Fionna Banner used the booth for her work twice.


Photoautomat Berlin. Photograph by Matt Bramford

Have you seen/heard any funny experiences concerning the photo booth that you can share?
I had a guy calling me once – he was totally out of it. He took some photos with his girlfriend and they didn’t came out. She got naked and they were concerned that they might get into the wrong hands. I wasn’t in town at that time and couldn’t do anything about it, but he insisted for me to come around. I finally managed to calm him down and sort everything out. 

Photos from our Twitter friends: @vickeh, @mattbramf (me!), @c_rl, @deeandrews, @lizzlizz, @chaiwalla, @sallymumbycroft

What are you favourite images that the booth has created?
That would have to be all the photos form the exhibition/project we had during Photomonth last year. They reflect what the whole photo booth thing is all about.

Who would be your ideal customer – who would you most like to see use the booth?
Everybody is ideal. Everybody is welcome, as long as they respect our work and leave the booth as they found it for the next to come! Most likely they are probably analogue enthusiasts, students and Cargo guests. I have families, a couple from Lisbon, artists form Nottingham and even Henry Holland taking their photo in the booth!

A Photoautomat booth in Berlin, photographed by Lizz Lunney

What does the Photoautomat project hope to achieve, long term?
Hopefully we’re here for years to come and give people from all backgrounds the opportunity to have their little moment. It’s really all up to the people who use our booths and what they make of it. That is the beauty about it – and always will be.

See more pictures from the booths on the Photoautomat Facebook and Flickr pages.


Illustration by Abigail Wright

I have always been fascinated with analogue photo booths. I have vivd memories as a child – the excitement and anticipation, information pills pulling ridiculous faces, never really knowing what you’ll get until the old machines clunk and churn out your photographs. So, on a recent trip to Berlin, I was desperate to get back involved, like so many others, with the analogue phenomenon.

A short while after my return, I discovered that the Photoautomat project that exists in Berlin had transferred to London – one of those brightly coloured, glorious booths had been on my own doorstep and I didn’t even realise. A bit of internet research, a blog and a Twitter account later, I met Alex – Photoautomat’s London representative. He’s on a mission to bring back the beauty and art of the old-fashioned photo booth. Me, Amelia and fashion writers Sally and Jemma paid Alex a visit on a crisp Saturday morning to get involved, and have a chat with the man himself…

How did the Photoautomat project start, and where did the booths come from?
Well, it really started about 5 years ago in Germany, where my friends bought one of the booths because they were fascinated with the old analogue machines and the photos they produce. Soon it took over Berlin and the rest of the country. I got interested in the booth when I was over visiting and followed my friends around to look after the booths. We all have our memories from when we were young and fooling around in those booths at the Mall, but seeing them again in Berlin really ignited my passion for them again.

What do you know about the history of the booths?
The photo booth was invented 1925 by a Russian immigrant in New York. He opened his Photomaton Studio on Broadway. For just 25 cents, everybody could get their photograph taken. That was quite a revolution back then as photography was just for the rich and famous; because of the booths, it became accessible to everybody. 
From then on they were used as props in movies such as Band Wagon with Fred Astaire, by artists like Andy Warhol and people from all backgrounds for fun or memories and obviously passport photos.

Where are the booths located now?
Our booths are all over Germany. Most of them are in Berlin, but also in Hamburg, Dresden and Cologne. We launched a booth a while ago in Vienna. Then there is my booth here in London. There are also booths in Paris and Italy. 

How did this one end up in Cargo?
I thought it would be much easier to get a good location for a photo booth in London, but it turned out to be more difficult than I thought - policies and regulations mean a seemingly straightforward thing as installing a photo booth quite a task. I approached Cargo and they gave me the space in their beer garden straight away; they just liked the idea and it was done.

Photoautomat Cargo. Photograph by Matt Bramford

Why do you think the booths are so popular?
Well, people always like old things: vintage, analogue. The rebirth of Polaroid showed there is still a demand for analogue photography.There is something precious about a photo booth strip. It’s one moment, one photo and it can’t be replicated. No negative, no back up, just like real life. The photos also have a better quality than digital ones. There are apps out there on smart-phones to imitate the effect and I understand that most people don’t want to go through the hassle of having a analogue camera. This is where the photo booths come in. For a few quid, you can take your photo booth strip with your friends and keep that moment forever.

How do you think the qualities of these booths compare to the modern booths we see in train stations/etc?
I guess I answered that question above, but there really is no comparison. The digital ones lack quality and depth and the spontaneity you have in the analogue booth. 

Are there any other London locations planned? Or elsewhere in Europe?
I am looking for more locations in London. I would love to get some booths on the Southbank.

Has the booth been used for anything other than people taking pictures with their mates?
I had a photo shoot last year with Mixmag in the booth. It was a fashion special with hats. There were also a few artists who used the booth for their projects. Fionna Banner used the booth for her work twice.


Photoautomat Berlin. Photograph by Matt Bramford

Have you seen/heard any funny experiences concerning the photo booth that you can share?
I had a guy calling me once – he was totally out of it. He took some photos with his girlfriend and they didn’t came out. She got naked and they were concerned that they might get into the wrong hands. I wasn’t in town at that time and couldn’t do anything about it, but he insisted for me to come around. I finally managed to calm him down and sort everything out. 

Photos from our Twitter friends: @vickeh, @mattbramf (me!), @c_rl, @deeandrews, @lizzlizz, @chaiwalla, @sallymumbycroft

What are you favourite images that the booth has created?
That would have to be all the photos form the exhibition/project we had during Photomonth last year. They reflect what the whole photo booth thing is all about.

Who would be your ideal customer – who would you most like to see use the booth?
Everybody is ideal. Everybody is welcome, as long as they respect our work and leave the booth as they found it for the next to come! Most likely they are probably analogue enthusiasts, students and Cargo guests. I have families, a couple from Lisbon, artists form Nottingham and even Henry Holland taking their photo in the booth!

A Photoautomat booth in Berlin, photographed by Lizz Lunney

What does the Photoautomat project hope to achieve, long term?
Hopefully we’re here for years to come and give people from all backgrounds the opportunity to have their little moment. It’s really all up to the people who use our booths and what they make of it. That is the beauty about it – and always will be.

See more pictures from the booths on the Photoautomat Facebook and Flickr pages.

Intergalactic dreaming

Illustration by Ben Steers

As you may have seen yesterday in this post, help I went along to the Dreamboat Exhibition in Bristol last Friday. It is a collaboration between art platform makers, order Inkygoodness and Bristol label, Dreamboat Records using the theme: Dreamboat. As you probably gathered from yesterday’s post, I thoroughly enjoyed meandering about, staring heavily at the floating ships. However, as opposed to me rambling on about my own thoughts on each of the dreamy vessels, this post is devoted to four artists who contributed to the Dreamboat Exhibition. Fusing music and art, I wondered how the artists used music in their art and what inspired their own dreamboat illustrations. Please note that the Exhibition is open until December 30 – so you have plenty of time to get to the West and check out the gorgeous illustrations.

So, let’s start with Ben Steers. Ben is an illustrator and designer working out of Bristol. He has worked for a variety of companies including; The Sunday Times and the NHS as well as Spunky Clothing Label.

Moon Rise Ben Steers

Illustration by Ben Steers

What inspired your dreamboat?
My dreamboat piece was inspired by an ongoing narrative that has carried over from the last Inkygoodness show. It follows a solitary bear that spends his time playing amongst his woodland home. The bear looks out at the moon and dreams of other worlds. Before he knows it (and quite possibly under the influence of some kind of woodland mushrooms!) he finds himself sailing across the stars.

What’s your artist background?
I was always a restless child and never really clicked with education in the traditional sense. Being a “left sided thinker” art was a good outlet for my creativity and a practice that I naturally connected with. Since I was a wee nipper I have always enjoyed scribbling and when deciding on what course to do at uni, there seemed to be only one option – Illustration. I studied for 3 years at Plymouth University and graduated in 2008 with a BA Hons in Illustration and Graphic communication. Although I was “traditionally” trained in using oils/acrylics/pastels etc at school, my uni course taught me the commercial skills that I now implement in all my illustration work.

ABeautifulmachine1.Benjpg

Illustration by Ben Steers

How do you find music influence/inspire/interact your artwork?
I have always been a big music fan and find that music has an indirect effect on me and my work. There are certain genres that I will plug into when sitting down to complete certain tasks. I find that high-tempo, up-beat tune’s help me to really focus on what I’m doing and result in a much more productive artist. It has been a long time goal of mine to design a vinyl sleeve and inlay as I love the old classics and nothing touches the sound of vinyl. Unfortunately it is becoming harder and harder these days to crack into the music industry art scene, but I will keep the faith and my fingers crossed that something comes through!

Next is Dave Bain. An illustrator and designer, Dave has worked for CBeebies and the NSPCC, among many others. He is currently based in Bristol and also works as promoter and DJ.

Dave_Bain_2

Illustration by Dave Bain

What inspired your dreamboat picture?
I wanted to paint something that felt like it was floating in another reality separate from the hum-drum of every day life.  I’ve obsessed with masks and the playful nature of how they create drama and hidden secrets.  I’ve been developing a set of masked characters for a while, and the dreamy avenue that my piece was referencing lent itself perfectly to hiding the characters faces, except for the central younger lad.  Memories of children parties and feeling detached from that atmosphere run through this artwork.  I dream most nights and often have dreams involving finding my way to another world.  A previous exhibition with Inkygoodness had the theme of ‘Wonderland’ and I did a piece called “Journey to Wonderland” which featured another journey with similar characters, that time on the back of sparrows.

Dave_Bain

Illustration by Dave Bain

What’s your artist background?
As long as I can remember I’ve loved to draw and make things.  I dreamed of being able to make a living from it and have always had that goal in mind throughout my life.  I studied Illustration at Falmouth and loved every second of it, after which I moved to Bristol and threw myself into whatever creative opportunities came my way.  It’s my love of drawing and coming up with fun ways to interpret briefs proposed to me, which get me going.  I love the diversity of Bristol and the strength of the creative community here.

How does music influence/inspire/interact with your art?
I listen to music almost constantly, while working.  I love a wide-range, classical, jazz, folk, dubstep, techno – anything that is made with care, love and catches something in my brain and heart.  I run a folk night in Bristol called Feel The Folk and DJ in bars and clubs as well.  Music is definitely interwoven into the way I work and think.  I truly believe in its power to boost artistic creativity and love its motivational edge.  There’s nothing like getting lost in a painting with a soundtrack to accompany you.

Now Leila Shetty, an illustrator based in Liverpool. She likes drawing small birds and cats, among other things. Leila has just graduated from Liverpool School of Art.

LEILA_SHETTY_DREAMBOAT

Illustration by Leila Shetty

What inspired your dreamboat picture?
I kept my Dreamboat image quite simple and wanted to create quite a serene, peaceful illustration 
with the little boat sailing as the focal point. I think it is the serenity of the scene that makes it dream-like. 

What’s your artist background?
I studied Graphic Arts at Liverpool John Moores University (Liverpool School of Art) and specialised in Illustration half way through the course. I’ve always been much more interested in the creative industries than anything else but like to work on quite a small scale – Illustration is perfect for this. Since graduating I’ve been doing lots of different bits and bobs of freelance work. 

housesLeilaShetty

Illustration by Leila Shetty

How does music influence/inspire/interact with your art?
I think rather than music inspiring my work, it is words and stories that influence it. I suppose music can be a way to tell a story though. I like to produce work that is based on words and stories; these can be the most mundane and simple of things that make the most interesting images. I also like to do narrative work to tell stories.     

And finally we have Sarah Dennis. Sarah is an illustrator living in London. Her work ‘invokes a feel of story tale innocence with a contemporary feel’. As well as her illustrations, Sarah has a popular collection of handcrafted felt characters.

dreamboatSarahDennis

Illustration by Sarah Dennis

What inspired your dreamboat picture?
As the tile suggests, my inspiration came from the sensation you have in the morning when you are in a dream like state. I imagined myself floating in comfort and this floating feeling brought the nautical theme to mind with the water inhabited by jellyfish and sea creatures. The male character who is floating within the cut out waves and wearing a stage cape whilst holding a little boat represents vulnerability and innocence.

octo2Sarahdennis

Illustration by Sarah Dennis

What’s your artist background?
I moved from my hometown Brighton to Bristol in 2005 to complete a degree in illustration at the University of the West of England. My work developed over this time and I found that I enjoyed using collages to create whimsical narrative based artwork . After graduating I stayed in Bristol to work on a variety of creative projects. During this time I wrote, illustrated and published a children’s book called “Toby”. I also spent much of my time working with a creative collective called “Hot soup”. The group embarked upon several diverse projects: hosting drawing based events, creating cardboard creations for theater productions and completing bespoke illustrations for clients. After exhibiting a solo show at the “Here” Gallery I moved from Bristol to London were I now spend my days working in a studio in Stoke Newington along side many inspiring artists and illustrators.

wolfandrabbitflatSarahDennis

Illustration by Sarah Dennis

How does music influence/inspire/interact with your art?
After having an idea of what I would like to create whether it is for an exhibition or a piece of commissioned work, I find that music plays a very large part in the process. Having got my idea, with my materials and papers at the ready, the next thing to do is to put on the headphones and find the right album that complements the mood and tone of the artwork. This helps and even influences my art in the same way as working alongside other artists.

See Dreamboat Exhibition at Start Gallery, (via Top Deck) Start The Bus, Bristol

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