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Top 25 Art Blog - Creative Tourist

Secret Garden Party 2010: Friday Review

Secret Garden Party is a festival like no other. Here I sample fish therapy and review the Friday music acts including Animal Kingdom, Marina and the Diamonds, Infadels and Delays.

Written by Amelia Gregory

Hidden in a mini industrial estate just off Curtain Road, sales Payne Shurvell opens their inaugural exhibition “A Bright and Guilty Place” in an old light factory. The gallery directors introduce thirteen artists’ -who are either unrepresented or have yet to show in London- unique approaches to the subject of mapping and place. The word introduction is mentioned as the gallery presents an idea of each individual’s practice – rather than claiming to represent their overture in it’s entirety. What is successful about this show is that it does not feel as if the curators have placed a theme on the artists rather they have found 13 separate practices that uniquely represent mapping and place.

Ideas touch upon psycho-geography, cheapest and that endless human drive to find our place in the world – either through art or religion these questions are perennial.
Art offers a respite from the ever distance shortening communication provided by the internet. Maps provide a way of documenting economic prowess, find failure or entrapment as represented by Dan Hays replication of page 62 of the London A-Z focusing on the financial capital of London Canary Wharf.

Maps can also be used to document the trails of immigration, notably failed attempts or the endless drift of those people designated as unwanted. Lucy Wood demonstrates the paths of Mexicans who have attempted to cross the border and in worse cases died trying.

Andrew Curtis plays with ideas of suburbia with his eary prints of houses with trees printed over them…

Ideas of place are explored with Ian W’s print of the studios Jasper Johns inhabited during his time in New York – What makes a house a home? What makes a home important is it who lives there – is there added interest in Jasper Johns house because it belonged to Jasper Johns? What therefore could his house add to the conversation regarding his work?

Anika explores polish shop fronts through these exquisite models and her wonderful drawings.

Adrian McNeil’s sinister photographs tackle tricky ideas on immigration through the arrival of non native plants and their impact upon the ecosystem of their new destination. Making apparent the underlying sense of threat that immigration is all too often portrayed in the media as.

The world is full of misscommunication. History lessons are full of lessons that wars could have been stopped if only communication had been clearer. Frank Selby tackles this problem in his drawing “Stop the next next War War”.

This is a fascinating exhibition introducing artists at the beginning of their careers. Amelia’s Magazine throughly recommends a visit to Hewitt Street before July 24th.

The world is full of misscommunication. History lessons are full of lessons that wars could have been stopped if only communication had been clearer. Frank Selby tackles this problem in his drawing “Stop the next next War War”.

Hidden in a mini industrial estate just off Curtain Road, decease Payne Shurvell opens their inaugural exhibition “A Bright and Guilty Place” in an old light factory. The gallery directors introduce thirteen artists’ -who are either unrepresented or have yet to show in London- unique approaches to the subject of mapping and place. The word introduction is mentioned as the gallery presents an idea of each individual’s practice – rather than claiming to represent their overture in it’s entirety. What is successful about this show is that it does not feel as if the curators have placed a theme on the artists rather they have found 13 separate practices that uniquely represent mapping and place.

Derek Ogbourne’s Hope and Glory

Ideas touch upon psycho-geography, health and that endless human drive to find our place in the world – either through art or religion these questions are perennial.
Art offers a respite from the ever distance shortening communication provided by the internet. Maps provide a way of documenting economic prowess, failure or entrapment as represented by Dan Hays replication of page 62 of the London A-Z focusing on the financial capital of London Canary Wharf.

Maps can also be used to document the trails of immigration, notably failed attempts or the endless drift of those people designated as unwanted. Lucy Wood demonstrates the paths of Mexicans who have attempted to cross the border and in worse cases died trying.

Andrew Curtis plays with ideas of suburbia with his eary prints of houses with trees printed over them…

Ideas of place are explored with Ian W’s print of the studios Jasper Johns inhabited during his time in New York – What makes a house a home? What makes a home important is it who lives there – is there added interest in Jasper Johns house because it belonged to Jasper Johns? What therefore could his house add to the conversation regarding his work?

Anika explores polish shop fronts through these exquisite models and her wonderful drawings.

Adrian McNeil’s sinister photographs tackle tricky ideas on immigration through the arrival of non native plants and their impact upon the ecosystem of their new destination. Making apparent the underlying sense of threat that immigration is all too often portrayed in the media as.

This is a fascinating exhibition introducing artists at the beginning of their careers. Amelia’s Magazine throughly recommends a visit to Hewitt Street before July 24th.

The world is full of misscommunication. History lessons are full of lessons that wars could have been stopped if only communication had been clearer. Frank Selby tackles this problem in his drawing “Stop the next next War War”.

Hidden in a mini industrial estate just off Curtain Road, search Payne Shurvell opens their inaugural exhibition “A Bright and Guilty Place” in an old light factory. The gallery directors introduce thirteen artists’ -who are either unrepresented or have yet to show in London- unique approaches to the subject of mapping and place. The word introduction is mentioned as the gallery presents an idea of each individual’s practice – rather than claiming to represent their overture in it’s entirety. What is successful about this show is that it does not feel as if the curators have placed a theme on the artists rather they have found 13 separate practices that uniquely represent mapping and place.

Derek Ogbourne’s Hope and Glory

Ideas touch upon psycho-geography, and and that endless human drive to find our place in the world – either through art or religion these questions are perennial.
Art offers a respite from the ever distance shortening communication provided by the internet. Maps provide a way of documenting economic prowess, viagra buy failure or entrapment as represented by Dan Hays replication of page 62 of the London A-Z focusing on the financial capital of London Canary Wharf.

Maps can also be used to document the trails of immigration, notably failed attempts or the endless drift of those people designated as unwanted. Lucy Wood demonstrates the paths of Mexicans who have attempted to cross the border and in worse cases died trying.

Andrew Curtis plays with ideas of suburbia with his eary prints of houses with trees printed over them…

Ideas of place are explored with Ian W’s print of the studios Jasper Johns inhabited during his time in New York – What makes a house a home? What makes a home important is it who lives there – is there added interest in Jasper Johns house because it belonged to Jasper Johns? What therefore could his house add to the conversation regarding his work?

Anika explores polish shop fronts through these exquisite models and her wonderful drawings.

Adrian McNeil’s sinister photographs tackle tricky ideas on immigration through the arrival of non native plants and their impact upon the ecosystem of their new destination. Making apparent the underlying sense of threat that immigration is all too often portrayed in the media as.

This is a fascinating exhibition introducing artists at the beginning of their careers. Amelia’s Magazine throughly recommends a visit to Hewitt Street before July 24th.

SGP 2010-Collosillyum
Hay bales for seating in the Collosillyum area. Photography by Amelia Gregory.

If Latitude is a well planned amble between the South Bank, buy information pills ICA, store Royal Opera House and Somerset House with added sheep, then Secret Garden Party is the biggest most eccentric three day party in the grounds of a country mansion you could never dream of. Two more diverse festivals you could not imagine.

SGP 2010-Blimp
The Party Blimp – accessible only by boat.

Music is just one of the elements that make up the Secret Garden Party experience, surely the only festival where the main acts are liable to be upstaged by a death-defying wheelchair race or a mud wrestling fight. Because the stages are not the central focus there is always space to sit down or to dance, and the natural layout of the main stage in particular means that there’s always space to see the bands properly – which makes for a far more comfortable viewing experience than at most festivals. Despite a distinct lack of well known bands the quality of music on the line up is never low, and as usual I discovered lots of great new music.

SGP 2010-couple by Amelia Gregory
SGP 2010-frog by Amelia Gregory

My favourite Secret Garden Party stage is built into the side of a huge tree. This year there were giant eyeballs sewn into the back and the front was made up to look like the prow of a ship, complete with a naked female figurehead. Shortly before the prow had been swung into destruction by inebriated climbing mammals Animal Kingdom took to the good ship Where the Wild Things Are with a beatific set of melodic songs that have gleaned comparisons to Radiohead, Sigur Ros and Coldplay.

SGP 2010-Animal Kingdom by Amelia Gregory
SGP 2010-girls bust by Amelia Gregory
Animal Kingdom by Holly Exley
Animal Kingdom by Holly Exley.

Over in the geodesic rave dome – AKA the Remix Bubble – the Lake District’s finest Burn the Negative were proving to a small but highly motivated crowd (including security on balloons) that danceable indie electro doesn’t just come out of the big cities.

Alexis-West-Burn-the-Negative
Burn the Negative by Alexis West.

Secret Garden Party has expanded massively since I first came in 2004, and the more idiosyncratic attractions are now linked to the main arena by a floating bridge that caused much swaying hilarity on every crossing. As a mid afternoon treat I decided to get my toes nibbled by some miniature carp from Turkey.

SGP 2010-Fish Therapy
Yes that’s me. White legs! Photography by Tim Adey.

The Doctor Fish has been used for centuries to cure skin ailments, and they were particularly excited by my friend Jemima’s Psoriasis. It was a very soothing experience, and my skin felt notably softer afterwards. This is the first time this particular species of fish have been imported into the UK and entrepreneur Keon Petre hopes to open a range of fish nibbling franchises.

SGP 2010-Emma Ware by Amelia Gregory
Emma Ware.

A huge pink tent housed stalls from a carefully picked range of artists and designers including Spitalfields based illustrator Dan Hillier and jeweller Emma Ware, who makes gorgeous contemporary pieces from recycled inner tubes. Expect to hear more about her designs on this blog soon.

Abi Daker - Fionn Regan
Fionn Regan by Abigail Daker.

Fionn Regan was the perfect treat for a sunny day, following in the traditional mould of talented Irish folk singers with added 80s McEnroe hair band action. Never a bad thing in my book.

SGP 10-baby by Amelia Gregory
Steve Mason by Katherine Tromans
Steve Mason by Katherine Tromans.

I knew there was a reason I felt immediately warm towards main stage act Steve Mason despite having no clue who he was – turns out he was one half of the excellent Beta Band. And anyone who twitters about Ian Tomlinson is even better in my books. Musicians with a conscience – we need more of them.

emma_block_marina_&_the_diamonds
Marina and the Diamonds by Emma Block.

I’ve been a big fan of hot tip Marina and the Diamonds for some time now, but we missed most of her set whilst enjoying the most wonderful three course dinner at the Soulf Fire restaurant, housed in three yurts (read my full review here). Instead we caught the last few songs, which still gave me ample time to admire her vermillion lips and whippet thin waist: I can now confirm that she is every bit as sexy in the flesh as she comes across on record.

SGP 2010-Marina and the Diamonds by Amelia Gregory
SGP 2010-Marina and the Diamonds by Amelia Gregory

Afterwards we were treated to some nefarious circus fun from Down Under – including pubic angle-grinding, sword swallowing and weights hooked into eyelids. Tasteful.

SGP 2010-angle grinder circus by Amelia Gregory
SGP 2010-circus by Amelia Gregory
SGP 2010-circus eyeball lift by Amelia Gregory

I featured the Infadels way back in issue 04 of Amelia’s Magazine in 2005, and they’ve been steadily plugging away ever since. I haven’t heard any recent albums but they seemed quite happy to play lots of the old tunes, which perfectly suited the late night party crowd.

infadels by harriet gray
Infadels by Harriet Gray.

Most amusingly they seem to have acquired a female joint lead vocalist on one of their most famous tunes. Maybe all ageing bands will one day invite drunk negligee-wearing teenagers on board to spice things up. Oh hang on, it’s already become a trend… (see Saturday’s blog…)

SGP 2010-Infadels by Amelia Gregory

Abby-Wright-The-Delays
The Delays by Abby Wright.

Last up on Where the Wild Things Are at gone 1am the glitter-covered Delays played a fantastically energetic set to a shockingly small crowd. “Let’s see some shoulder action,” they pleaded. “It’s not a festival without it.” Several people obligingly mounted their friends with rapidity. I hope one day this vastly underrated band finds the success they deserve. Catch our recent interview with them here.

SGP 10-aliens by Amelia Gregory
SGP 10-robot mime by Amelia Gregory

Remember, there’s more where this came from – you can read about Saturday’s events here.

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One Response to “Secret Garden Party 2010: Friday Review”

  1. [...] piece for the delightful Amelia’s Magazine; this time, to accompany their review of the intriguing sounding Secret Garden Party Festival. I drew Fionn Regan and suffered an epic moment of angst ridden indecision over whether to do my [...]

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