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Top 25 Art Blog - Creative Tourist

Amelia Gregory

Amelia GregoryWhen Amelia is not managing Amelia’s Magazine she takes huge quantities of photos. You can see more of her photography on the Amelia Gregory website (which is seriously out of date, you’ve been warned!) and her photos often appear in the articles she writes. She used to make a living shooting portraits and fashion stories for the likes of The Guardian, ES Magazine, Sleaze Nation, Time Out and 125 Magazine and is only too happy to accept commissions! Get in touch with Amelia and let her know what you’d like her to shoot.

Amelia is available and loves to teach. Why not ask her to lecture at your college? She has taught extensively in many top universities and has several popular lectures ready to go, including:

  • How to Set Up a Magazine
  • How to Put Together and Pitch Fashion Shoots
  • How to Break Into the World of Editorial Illustration
  • How to Work with Effectively With Art Direction
  • How to Get Your Ideas Into the World With Effective Social Networking
  • How Illustration Can Imagine a Better World

She is also available for seminars, conferences and as a consultant on all things creative. Email Amelia Gregory for more information.

Amelia spends a lot of time organising, networking, designing, managing print production, calling celidhs and taking photos for Climate Camp because she believes what they are doing is one of the most important things in the world.

Amelia also calls celidhs (barndances if you prefer) with her band Green Kite Midnight which was formed through friendships made at Climate Camp. Green Kite Midnight are available to play sweet celidh music wherever the cause is good enough. Amelia has been calling non-traditional celidhs (featuring a mash-up of Scottish, Irish, English and Appalachian music and dances) for several years now but her biggest celidh to date was held in the main marquee at Climate Camp 2009 on Blackheath, where she got at least 500 people dancing up a storm in perfect harmony.