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Top 25 Art Blog - Creative Tourist

Earth Listings: 12 – 18 October

Written by Adam S

Radical Nature is an exhibition at the Barbican that explores art and architecture for a changing planet, side effects illness it was held over summer and now next week is the last chance to go and see the exhibits.

Rad1

The gallery has brought together an array of artists, recipe designers and architects across different generations to collaborate in the space. The ideas are drawn form environmental activism, case experimental architecture and utopianism and make for an interesting whirlwind tour of how we can look to live in the changing global climate.
With over 20 artists presenting their work there is plenty to take in take in and lots to learn, I’ve picked out my top 5 which I think we can learn the most from or are just pretty dam inspiring.

Air-Port-City
Tomas Saraceno

rad3

One of the first things you come across, the bubble cell joined up plastic blobs that relate to Tomas’s concept of Air-Port City. He wants it to challenge the political structure and look for people and nations to communicate and join in synergy with a no borders approach. The conjoined cells, and black rope make up an interesting visual and you can instantly relate it to some far off futuristic utopia.

Geodesic Dome
Richard Buckminster Fuller

rad6

Taking one of the centre places is the Geodesic dome, pioneered by Richard Fuller over sixty years ago. The revolutionary structure built up of triangular elements is now replicated all over the world. A film, Modelling Universe, where Fuller explains how universal and natural elements can be simplified down to triangles is defiantly worth a watch.

The survival Series
Newton and Helen Harrison

rad5

A collaboration in the seventies where the two began to work on projects that would benefit the ecosystem. It culminated in Full Farm, which is restaged at the Barbican. Cleverly constructed raised beds and vegetable plots are used to grow a range of crops. Tomatoes in a gallery are certainly a first for me, although not too sure about the huge watt bulbs powering the photosynthesis.

Wheatfield
Agnes Denes

rad4

An inspiring take on environmental art that can’t help to challenge peoples perceptions. Wheatfield – A Confrontation where two acres of wheat were planted in a landfill right next to New York created amazing images. The project was created at Dalston Mill for the Radical Nature exhibition. The fields and towers give an apocalyptic and futuristic feel and the idea of crops bordering towns and cities seem like an attractive idea to me.

Fallen Forest
Henrik Hakansson

Rad2

Another installation to challenge perceptions, a 16metre squared piece of rainforest is flipped on its side. The massive lights create an artificial environment that Hakansson aims to point out the unbalanced relationship between man and nature, although I’m not sure if the huge electricity power needed is meant to be part of the analysis.

Waste Flow
Mierle Laderman Ukeles

rad10

Involving all of New York’s districts Mierle met every bin man in the area and personally thanked all 8,500 of them. What I found most interesting was the rubbish flow film that came out of the project, which follows the household rubbish through the streets to landfill. The amount of waste and the fact that we all distance ourselves from the process means that it is a fascinating and eye-opening documentary on our waste and throw away culture.

rad7

The exhibition is defiantly worth a visit and with plenty of other intricacies and projects to look at and learn from on the two floors. Urban Harvest Festival will also be taking place next Thursday the 15th where a DIY disco invite people to bring their own music to season the evening alongside a food and end-of-season harvest Swapshop, as well as chefs from Searcy’s cooking up a treat.

Radical Nature is an exhibition at the Barbican that explores art and architecture for a changing planet, information pills it was held over summer but is now coming to a close with next week as the last chance to go and see the exhibits.

Rad1

The gallery has brought together an array of artists, web designers and architects across different generations to collaborate in the space. The ideas are drawn from environmental activism, experimental architecture and utopianism and make for an interesting whirlwind tour of how we can look to live in the changing global climate.
With over 20 artists presenting their work there is plenty to take in and lots to learn, I’ve picked out my top 5 most inspiring installations.

Air-Port-City
Tomas Saraceno

rad3

One of the first things you come across, the bubble cell joined up plastic blobs that relate to Tomas’s concept of Air-Port City. He wants it to challenge the political structure and look for people and nations to communicate and join in synergy with a no borders approach. The conjoined cells, and black rope make up an interesting visual and you can instantly relate it to some far off futuristic utopia.

Geodesic Dome
Richard Buckminster Fuller

rad6

Taking one of the centre places is the Geodesic dome, pioneered by Richard Fuller over sixty years ago. The revolutionary structure built up of triangular elements is now replicated all over the world. A film, Modelling Universe, where Fuller explains how universal and natural elements can be simplified down to triangles is defiantly worth a watch.

The survival Series
Newton and Helen Harrison

rad5

A collaboration in the seventies where the two began to work on projects that would benefit the ecosystem. It culminated in Full Farm, which is restaged at the Barbican. Cleverly constructed raised beds and vegetable plots are used to grow a range of crops. Tomatoes in a gallery are certainly a first for me, although not too sure about the huge watt bulbs powering the photosynthesis.

Wheatfield
Agnes Denes

rad4

An inspiring take on environmental art that can’t help to challenge peoples perceptions. Wheatfield – A Confrontation where two acres of wheat were planted in a landfill right next to New York created amazing images. The project was created at Dalston Mill for the Radical Nature exhibition. The fields and towers give an apocalyptic and futuristic feel and the idea of crops bordering towns and cities seem like an attractive idea to me.

Fallen Forest
Henrik Hakansson

Rad2

Another installation to challenge perceptions, a 16metre squared piece of rainforest is flipped on its side. The massive lights create an artificial environment that Hakansson aims to point out the unbalanced relationship between man and nature, although I’m not sure if the huge electricity power needed is meant to be part of the analysis.

Waste Flow
Mierle Laderman Ukeles

rad10

Involving all of New York’s districts Mierle met every bin man in the area and personally thanked all 8,500 of them. What I found most interesting was the rubbish flow film that came out of the project, which follows the household rubbish through the streets to landfill. The amount of waste and the fact that we all distance ourselves from the process means that it is a fascinating and eye-opening documentary on our waste and throw away culture.

rad7

The exhibition is defiantly worth a visit and with plenty of other intricacies and projects to look at and learn from on the two floors. Urban Harvest Festival will also be taking place next Thursday the 15th where a DIY disco invite people to bring their own music to season the evening alongside a food and end-of-season harvest Swapshop, as well as chefs from Searcy’s cooking up a treat.

Radical Nature is an exhibition at the Barbican that explores art and architecture for a changing planet, symptoms it was held over summer but is now coming to a close with next week as the last chance to go and see the exhibits.

Rad1

The gallery has brought together an array of artists, for sale designers and architects across different generations to collaborate in the space. The ideas are drawn from environmental activism, page experimental architecture and utopianism and make for an interesting whirlwind tour of how we can look to live in the changing global climate.
With over 20 artists presenting their work there is plenty to take in and lots to learn, I’ve picked out my top 5 most inspiring installations.

Air-Port-City
Tomas Saraceno

rad3

One of the first things you come across, the bubble cell joined up plastic blobs that relate to Tomas’s concept of Air-Port City. He wants it to challenge the political structure and look for people and nations to communicate and join in synergy with a no borders approach. The conjoined cells, and black rope make up an interesting visual and you can instantly relate it to some far off futuristic utopia.

Geodesic Dome
Richard Buckminster Fuller

rad6

Taking one of the centre places is the Geodesic dome, pioneered by Richard Fuller over sixty years ago. The revolutionary structure built up of triangular elements is now replicated all over the world. A film, Modelling Universe, where Fuller explains how universal and natural elements can be simplified down to triangles is defiantly worth a watch.

The survival Series
Newton and Helen Harrison

rad5

A collaboration in the seventies where the two began to work on projects that would benefit the ecosystem. It culminated in Full Farm, which is restaged at the Barbican. Cleverly constructed raised beds and vegetable plots are used to grow a range of crops. Tomatoes in a gallery are certainly a first for me, although not too sure about the huge watt bulbs powering the photosynthesis.

Wheatfield
Agnes Denes

rad4

An inspiring take on environmental art that can’t help to challenge peoples perceptions. Wheatfield – A Confrontation where two acres of wheat were planted in a landfill right next to New York created amazing images. The project was created at Dalston Mill for the Radical Nature exhibition. The fields and towers give an apocalyptic and futuristic feel and the idea of crops bordering towns and cities seem like an attractive idea to me.

Fallen Forest
Henrik Hakansson

Rad2

Another installation to challenge perceptions, a 16metre squared piece of rainforest is flipped on its side. The massive lights create an artificial environment that Hakansson aims to point out the unbalanced relationship between man and nature, although I’m not sure if the huge electricity power needed is meant to be part of the analysis.

Waste Flow
Mierle Laderman Ukeles

rad10

Involving all of New York’s districts Mierle met every bin man in the area and personally thanked all 8,500 of them. What I found most interesting was the rubbish flow film that came out of the project, which follows the household rubbish through the streets to landfill. The amount of waste and the fact that we all distance ourselves from the process means that it is a fascinating and eye-opening documentary on our waste and throw away culture.

rad7

The exhibition is defiantly worth a visit and with plenty of other intricacies and projects to look at and learn from on the two floors. Urban Harvest Festival will also be taking place next Thursday the 15th where a DIY disco invite people to bring their own music to season the evening alongside a food and end-of-season harvest Swapshop, as well as chefs from Searcy’s cooking up a treat.

Radical Nature is an exhibition at the Barbican that explores art and architecture for a changing planet, nurse it was held over summer but is now coming to a close with next week as the last chance to go and see the exhibits.

Rad1

The gallery has brought together an array of artists, malady designers and architects across different generations to collaborate in the space. The ideas are drawn from environmental activism, cost experimental architecture and utopianism and make for an interesting whirlwind tour of how we can look to live in the changing global climate.
With over 20 artists presenting their work there is plenty to take in and lots to learn, I’ve picked out my top 6 most inspiring installations.

1. Air-Port-City
Tomas Saraceno

rad3

One of the first things you come across, the bubble cell joined up plastic blobs that relate to Tomas’s concept of Air-Port City. He wants it to challenge the political structure and look for people and nations to communicate and join in synergy with a no borders approach. The conjoined cells, and black rope make up an interesting visual and you can instantly relate it to some far off futuristic utopia.

2. Geodesic Dome
Richard Buckminster Fuller

rad6

Taking one of the centre places is the Geodesic dome, pioneered by Richard Fuller over sixty years ago. The revolutionary structure built up of triangular elements is now replicated all over the world. A film, Modelling Universe, where Fuller explains how universal and natural elements can be simplified down to triangles is defiantly worth a watch.

3. The survival Series
Newton and Helen Harrison

rad5

A collaboration in the seventies where the two began to work on projects that would benefit the ecosystem. It culminated in Full Farm, which is restaged at the Barbican. Cleverly constructed raised beds and vegetable plots are used to grow a range of crops. Tomatoes in a gallery are certainly a first for me, although not too sure about the huge watt bulbs powering the photosynthesis.

4. Wheatfield
Agnes Denes

rad4

An inspiring take on environmental art that can’t help to challenge peoples perceptions. Wheatfield – A Confrontation where two acres of wheat were planted in a landfill right next to New York created amazing images. The project was created at Dalston Mill for the Radical Nature exhibition. The fields and towers give an apocalyptic and futuristic feel and the idea of crops bordering towns and cities seem like an attractive idea to me.

5. Fallen Forest
Henrik Hakansson

Rad2

Another installation to challenge perceptions, a 16metre squared piece of rainforest is flipped on its side. The massive lights create an artificial environment that Hakansson aims to point out the unbalanced relationship between man and nature, although I’m not sure if the huge electricity power needed is meant to be part of the analysis.

6. Waste Flow
Mierle Laderman Ukeles

rad10

Involving all of New York’s districts Mierle met every bin man in the area and personally thanked all 8,500 of them. What I found most interesting was the rubbish flow film that came out of the project, which follows the household rubbish through the streets to landfill. The amount of waste and the fact that we all distance ourselves from the process means that it is a fascinating and eye-opening documentary on our waste and throw away culture.

rad7

The exhibition is defiantly worth a visit and with plenty of other intricacies and projects to look at and learn from on the two floors. Urban Harvest Festival will also be taking place next Thursday the 15th where a DIY disco invite people to bring their own music to season the evening alongside a food and end-of-season harvest Swapshop, as well as chefs from Searcy’s cooking up a treat.

The week kicks off with demo against agrofuels and ends with the Great Climate Swoop, page we are riding on a wave with the cancellation of Heathrow’s 3rd runway and the plans for 2 new coal power station put on hold, lets see what changes we can make this week…

el1
Illustration by Michael Maitland

Agrofuels don’t ROC(k)! Demo
Monday 12 October 2009

Agrofuels – biofuels produced using intensive agriculture – are a major driver of deforestation, in turn, a major cause of climate change. Agrofuels from palm oil in particular are accelerating the burning of Indonesian forests and underlying peat bogs with truly astronomical emissions as a result.

Burning palm oil is probably the most environmentally damaging and climate negative way to produce power and yet this seems to be what the government wants to subsidise. A demo called by
Campaign against Climate Change, Biofuelwatch and Food not Fuel will take place on Monday outside DECC (Dept of Energy and Climate Change)

Web Address: http://www.campaigncc.org/node/336

2012 Imperative Teach-In
Monday 12 October

An event geared for the education system, students and teachers alike and how we can confront the issues of the time, resource depletion, loss of biodiversity and especially the issue of climate change. Speakers include John Thackara, Andrew Simms, Jonathan Crinion, Stephanie Hankey, Richard Hawkins, Ben Gill and Emma Dewberry.

Website: http://www.teach-in.co.uk/
Time: 10am

Architecture and Climate Change
Tuesday 13 October 2009

The UK has one of the biggest targets of for delivering zero-carbon homes by 2016, with time pressing how is the government living up to it’s targets? Join the debate with leading Ashden Award winners as the respond to the proposition: ‘If I were the Government Minister responsible for zero carbon new buildings the key things that I would do to ensure that we are able to meet our targets would be…’
In partnership with The Ashden Awards for Sustainable Energy £8, £5 concession.

Venue: RIBA, 66 Portland Place, London W1B 1AD
Time: 6.00pm
Venue: www.architecture.com/WhatsOn/Talks/Events/2009/Autumn/Talks/IntDiaPorritt.aspx

Earthwatch lecture: Meeting Marine Needs
Thursday 15 October

el3

Human activities and climate change pose multiple threats to marine species. At the lecture you will hear how their conservation needs are being addressed, while also bringing social and economic benefits to the local communities.

Time: 7.00pm-8.30pm
Venue: Royal Geographical Society, 1 Kensington Gore, London, SW7 2AR
Website: www.earthwatch.org/europe/get_involved/events09/lecture09-marine/

Naturewise Workshops
Date: Saturday 17 – Sunday 18 October

Feeling a bit out of touch with the how the food got onto your plate? A day dedicated to an overview of traditional ways of preserving food and to gain hands on experience of some of those techniques.

Venue: Hornsey Rise Gardens, N19
Time: 9am-5pm
Web Address: http://www.naturewise.org.uk/page.cfm

How to make a wood-burner from a gas bottle
Date: Saturday 17 – Sunday 18 October

el2

Been impressed with someone with a wood burner, here is your chance to learn how to construct a wood-burning stove out of recycled materials quickly and easily. Suitable for home, workshop, motor-home, yurt, shed or canal boat. Learn how to design, build and install a strong, effective, durable stove for your own needs.

Venue: Hackney City Farm, London
Web Address: http://www.lowimpact.org/

Introduction to Permaculture Design
Date: Saturday 17 – Sunday 18 October

A chance to learn the basics of permaculture, a process where plants are grown in accordance to the natural order of things.
These courses introduce the basics and show how this approach can be applied to your garden at home or allotment.

Venue: Brighton Earthship, Stanmer Park Brighton
Time: 9.30-5pm both days
Web Address: http://www.brightonpermaculture.co.uk/

The Great Climate Swoop
Saturday 17 October

This Saturday people from across the country will descend on Ratcliffe On Soar Power station to raise awareness of the huge affect coal power has on the planet and how the governments continued reliance of the energy is accelerating climate change.
There are a four different blocks to choose from that will aim to shut down the power station, make sure you get down for what’s geared to be an exciting and empowering day.

Venue: Ratcliffe On Soar Power Station, meet at Nottingham Train Station at 10am
Website: http://www.climatecamp.org.uk/actions/climate-swoop-2009

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