Listings

    No events to show

Follow

Twitter

|

Facebook

|

MySpace

|

Last.fm

RSS

Subscribe

Top 25 Art Blog - Creative Tourist

Brilliantly Birmingham celebrates 10 years of International Contemporary Jewellery Festival

Written by Rachael Oku

atp montage1

All Tomorrow Parties, clinic a music festival that largely happens at out of season holiday camps, try celebrates it’s tenth year in 2009 and part of that anniversary celebration sees the release of this film, edited from fans and filmmakers footage on equipment ranging from super 8′s to mobile phones, the viewer is let in to the world of All Tomorrow’s Parties. The ensuing montage, of performances and backstage vox pops, is a cross between a really great music documentary and an advert for the music festival.

The documentary side of this film’s personality informs the viewer that the premise of ATP started with Glasgow’s saccharine indie pop makers, Belle and Sebastien. Along with visionary ATP promoter, Barry Hogan, they originally had the idea of putting on a festival in a holiday camp, curated by artists and did just that for the ATP pre-cursor, Bowlie Weekender in Camber Sands. The viewer also learns that ATP manages to exist independently, without the help from corporate sponsors, adhering to a punk rock ethic.

karen_o_live_by_leigh_johnson2668_8

The advertisement side shows you just how much fun a festival in a holiday camp can be with footage of holidaymakers looking like the cat who got the cream whilst dancing to Micah P. Hinson, or playing a rendition of ‘Maps’ on the chalet kitchen sink.

nick_cave_in_crowd_by_shannon_mcclean_8

I’ve alluded here to some of the musical footage that belies the rockumentary. If Kitsune is the indie electro rave that you have to be young to get into, ATP is where you retire, where you give up on pretending to keep up with the rapidly changes fads of NME and resign to sticking to what you know best. And if what you know best hits the Richter scale somewhere between alternative and experimental, then you’ll be familiar with a fair few bands that frequent the ATP line-ups. Not only are there fantastic show-stopping ATP performances from YYYs, Nick Cave’s Grinderman, Gossip, and Mars Volta, you also get to see the spontaneous performances that may not have been billed, like the Grizzly Bear beach a capella and Daniel Johnston regaling his insecurities via music in the grass and from his chalet.

grizzly_bear_playing_to_crowd_on_the_beach_-_credit_sophie_8

These elements of the film are weaved together with a cinematic collage of artists backstage, like Bat For Lashes dancing down the stairs of her accommodation. And just to remind you where you are, there are also vintage stills and clips of Camber Sands as it is known best, as a holiday camp, including what looks like a dance competition whose contestants could rival anyone down the front of a moshpit.

bat_for_lashes_credit_jack_paddington_and_millie_harvey_8

Having never been to ATP myself (but always having wanted to), I wonder whether this has captured the essence of the festival. But with enough music and merriment to keep you entertained, it really doesn’t matter.

patti_smith_8

Patti Smith closes the film and I’ll close this article with a quote in the film from her, which is in line with an underlying message of ATP, “rock and roll belongs to the kids and not the big companies.”
atp montage1

All Tomorrow Parties, view a music festival that largely happens at out of season holiday camps, approved celebrates it’s tenth year in 2009 and part of that anniversary celebration sees the release of this film, edited from fans and filmmakers footage on equipment ranging from super 8′s to mobile phones, the viewer is let in to the world of All Tomorrow’s Parties. The ensuing montage, of performances and backstage vox pops, is a cross between a really great music documentary and an advert for the music festival.

The documentary side of this film’s personality informs the viewer that the premise of ATP started with Glasgow’s saccharine indie pop makers, Belle and Sebastien. Along with visionary ATP promoter, Barry Hogan, they originally had the idea of putting on a festival in a holiday camp, curated by artists and did just that for the ATP pre-cursor, Bowlie Weekender in Camber Sands. The viewer also learns that ATP manages to exist independently, without the help from corporate sponsors, adhering to a punk rock ethic.

karen_o_live_by_leigh_johnson2668_8

The advertisement side shows you just how much fun a festival in a holiday camp can be with footage of holidaymakers looking like the cat who got the cream whilst dancing to Micah P. Hinson, or playing a rendition of ‘Maps’ on the chalet kitchen sink.

nick_cave_in_crowd_by_shannon_mcclean_8

I’ve alluded here to some of the musical footage that belies the rockumentary. If Kitsune is the indie electro rave that you have to be young to get into, ATP is where you retire, where you give up on pretending to keep up with the rapidly changes fads of NME and resign to sticking to what you know best. And if what you know best hits the Richter scale somewhere between alternative and experimental, then you’ll be familiar with a fair few bands that frequent the ATP line-ups. Not only are there fantastic show-stopping ATP performances from YYYs, Nick Cave’s Grinderman, The Gossip, Mars Volta, you also get to see the spontaneous performances that may not have been billed, like the Grizzly Bear beach a capella and Daniel Johnston regaling his insecurities via music in the grass and from his chalet.

grizzly_bear_playing_to_crowd_on_the_beach_-_credit_sophie_8

These elements of the film are weaved together with a cinematic collage of artists backstage, like Bat For Lashes dancing down the stairs of her accommodation. And just to remind you where you are, there are also vintage stills and clips of Camber Sands as it is known best, as a holiday camp, including what looks like a dance competition whose contestants could rival anyone down the front of a moshpit.

bat_for_lashes_credit_jack_paddington_and_millie_harvey_8

Having never been to ATP myself (but always having wanted to), I wonder whether this has captured the essence of the festival. But with enough music and merriment to keep you entertained, it really doesn’t matter.

patti_smith_8

Patti Smith closes the film and I’ll close this article with a quote in the film from her, which is in line with an underlying message of ATP, “rock and roll belongs to the kids and not the big companies.”
filthy tea cup

We’re interviewing Diana Boyle, more about whose gorgeous illustrations of day-to-day sights pf Britain – tea and fags! - can be found on her intriguingly designed, multi-layered website Rooftop Illustrations.

lone diner

1) Where do you think your style comes from? Your childhood, your culture, your training, your friends and peers perhaps?

Across the board, I’ve always been interested in/obsessed with detail. Don’t get me wrong, I’m not OCD just yet – though I can’t brush my teeth whilst standing on a carpet. That’s a story for another time I think.

I was always the last at school to finish a still-life drawing. I mean, come on! – the inside of an onion was so fascinating, why rush it to draw a pear?

luscious steak pattern

2) Who are your favourite artists and illustrators?

Dali’s brilliant. I’m not a surrealist myself, but his house in Portlligat still oozes his personality. I love that. Seeing personality in work, not just doing what’s expected.

Also, Charley Harper is brilliant. He’s one of those guys where you think, bugger, I wish I’d thought of that.

map of the UK_A2

3) Where do you work? In a studio or at home? At a desk, at a computer?

I work in my lounge; on my lap, at my desk/brekkie table. Starting with coffee, then tea, my day normally begins with being entertained by a particularly stumpy-tailed squirrel frolicking in the garden. I like seeing life outside my patio doors, it reminds me that life’s not centred around me & what I’m doing.

stacked glasses

4) Do you start working on paper when inspiration strikes or do you go straight to the computer? How do your preferred method and materials inform your work?

My phone’s notebook is filled with ideas that hit me at inopportune moments. From there, it’s beavering in my sketch book, and then, only when it’s near final, it graduates to the mac. I love working with fine-line pens, colour pencils & felt-tips.

urchin

5) Do you collaborate with others or prefer to work alone? Why?

I hate to admit it, but sometimes people have better ideas than me, or know how to move something to the next stage when I’m stumped. So the work I have done in collaboration has worked out well. It’s hard letting go, but hey, I wasn’t born an only child so I’m used to it.

valley

6) Your website is lovely. How important is it to you to have a strong web presence? Do you use Twitter or social networks? How do you promote your work?

Web presence is stupidly important. I’m lucky, I knew what I wanted, and I knew who I wanted to build it; my designeree boyfriend, Matt Dent. Paying in wine, cheese & chocolate is a small price to pay for a site I’ve learnt to maintain, and one I’m very proud of.

I must admit, I’m not a Twitterer. I find it hard to keep up with everyone, but admire those who can. Self-promotion is the biggest hurdle for any illustrator, and I’m not sure I’ve cracked it yet.wimbledon village bakery.lush

7) What would be your dream commission?

To be let loose on a massively detailed drawing, big scale, big budget, comfortable turn-around time, and a free dog (preferably whippet) thrown in. I really want a dog. Let me know if you hear of one available.
background

Image courtesy of Brilliantly Birmingham

This November the Brilliantly Birmingham International Contemporary Jewellery Festival celebrates its tenth anniversary in style by hosting two exhibits at Birmingham Museum & Art Gallery comprising of the annual selling show, cost promoting both international and home grown eco designers, and a Tenth Anniversary Retrospective featuring the work of seven acclaimed designers whose work has headlined previous festivals: Mikaela Lyons, Kathryn Marchbank, Betty Pepper, Lisa Juen, Anke Plath, Vaishali Morjaria and Sally Collins. Firmly rooted within Birmingham’s historic Jewellery Quarter (a designated conservation area which employs around 4,000 people and is home to more than 80 contemporary designer makers), Brilliantly Birmingham started in 1999 when a few designers started out to promote their work under a single brand name. Since its humble beginnings this festival has gone from strength to strength becoming an integral event in the international crafts calendar.

Sally Collins

Image courtesy of Sally Collins

Among the wealth of innovative designers exhibiting this year are three British designers Sally Collins, Kathryn Marchbank and Betty Pepper whose quirky designs caught our eye. An avid champion of ‘Make Do and Mend’ culture Sally Collins creates her pieces from second-hand fabrics such as crochet and lace, heat treated copper and gold-plated elements to create compositions of layered pattern, colour and form. With a playful emphasis on excess detailing and frills Sally’s sometimes eccentric designs add to the charm of her work making her a much loved designer. Of her work Sally says: “My concern is not only with the ecological benefits of re-using and re-inventing something old, discarded or forgotten, but with the beauty of the history of an object when it has been passed down through a family or transformed into something else for another purpose.”

Kathryn Marchbank Inertia Brooches Oblong&Octagon 1

Image courtesy of Kathryn Marchbank

Kathryn Marchbank designs by the name of Everygirlsenvy creating jewellery with a playful yet elegant aesthetic, giving an interpretation of the forms and lines that she observes in the movement and language of dance. By interacting and working alongside artists established in the fields of performance, dance, choreography and music Kathryn aims to embody a visual expression of movement through form and colour in abstract styles and figurative shapes. Using materials such as oxidised sterling silver, Perspex and enamel Kathryn’s pieces are highly wearable and unique. Recent commissions have included London’s Sadler’s Wells Theatre supplying accessories for their Hip Hop festival ‘Breakin’ Convention’. Having appeared in several publications a highlight this year saw Kathryn’s most eye catching designs feature in Mario Testino’s ‘Good Vibrations’ shoot for British Vogue back in May.

Betty Pepper The Memoirs of a Dressmaker £800

Image courtesy of Betty Pepper

Betty Pepper’s stunning and ornate collection is made from recycled materials such as clothing, textiles and paper preferring to use materials that have a past rather than creating disposable fashion. Betty says of her designs: “I like to feel that they have ‘lived a little’ and have their own story to tell with signs of ageing and how they have been treated or, perhaps, mistreated. Every discarded object is a piece of the patchwork of someone else’s life. Fashion is so throw away, it’s that waste of textiles that makes me sad.” Inspired by stories, poems and memories Betty uses traditional jewellery techniques evolved into stitch; the threads of which translate into beautiful lace and crochet one-off pieces. Betty’s designs incorporate word games, hidden messages and secrets which reflect her personality and also inject a playful sense of humour into her jewellery collections.
Brilliantly Birmingham takes place from 21st November 2009 – 28th February 2010 at a selection of venues across Birmingham. For further information visit www.brilliantlybirmingham.com

Tags:

, , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Similar Posts:

2 Responses to “Brilliantly Birmingham celebrates 10 years of International Contemporary Jewellery Festival”

  1. ash lavender says:

    Hi.. where is the other Jewellery Makers work (images)… especially the International designer? would have been nice to see the contrast of cultures.

  2. Amelia says:

    Hi Ash, Thanks a lot for your comment, I always appreciate feedback from readers. I agree with you in that it would have been nice to see the work of some of the international designers too. I will definitely try to reflect a little more diversity in any more pieces I write like this as I too would like to celebrate design from every culture whenever possible.

Leave a Reply