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Top 25 Art Blog - Creative Tourist

KTZ: London Collections: Men A/W 2014 Catwalk Review

KTZ have long been one of my favourite shows to catch, here's why! The madness unfolded in Victoria House on Wednesday 8 January…

Written by Matt Bramford


KTZ A/W 2014 by Sine Skau

Only if resident LC:M hunk David Gandy has been wheeled in will you find a tedious tailored three-piece suit at a KTZ show – and that’s exactly why I bloody love going.


KTZ A/W 2014 by Mitika Suri


All photography by Matt Bramford

The usual onslaught of chaos occurred outside, but I knew that once inside, it would be relatively empty. In the basement of Victoria House, I was right – rows of empty seats were frantically being filled as I picked a good standing vantage point from which to view this season’s bizarre brilliance.

A KTZ menswear show tends to feel comfortingly familiar, yet entirely different. The ambiguous, evocative symbols that mix Sanskrit with religious symbols with godknowswhat adorned most garments, black and white dominated this collection and the silhouettes were as dramatic as ever. So what do you do to mix things up a bit? Paint the bloody models ice white, of course. This is definitely not a show to appeal to the Harris Tweed brigade.

Pieces seemed to be bigger than ever this season. XXL hoods draped over models past the knee; furs, scarves and thick fabrics enveloped models’ faces and necks; a sort of Arctic exploration on LSD. I was dazzled by caps with metal embellishments, metal headpieces that crept down foreheads, jewels attached to sweatshirts that had been arranged in a precise, mathematical fashion, and skintight jumpsuits that were so low cut that they revealed navels.


KTZ A/W 2014 by Sine Skau

The tribal, cultish vibe remained at this collection’s core, its mix of graphic emblems and experiments with fabric keeping every audience member’s attention all the way through over forty looks. I won’t even attempt to define it, categorise it, or discuss it in terms of how wearable, sellable or functional it is. That would be a mistake. It’s better to sit (or stand) back, revel in the showmanship of it all, then stock up on Snazaroo face paint when you get home.

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