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Top 25 Art Blog - Creative Tourist

LFW 09 – Basso and Brooke – Pop Goes The World

Somerset House, London 2009

Written by Sabrina Morrison

Earlier this year, pharm The Canalside Environment Group initiated an act of guerilla gardening in a North Oxford resident’s estate. Amelia’s Magazine spoke to Moira regarding the reasons behind the action.

GG1

How and where did the idea for the Guerilla Gardening come about?

One of our members read about the concept and brought the idea to the group. We are an environmental action group and loved the idea of not waiting for the ‘authorities’ to brighten up wasteland areas. Instead taking it into our own hands by doing something to brighten up an area for the community.

We chose to plant bulbs as we like the idea of them emerging in the spring with many people enjoying them but not knowing how they got there. We also planted a fruit tree that in time we hope will yield fruit that can be picked and shared by the local community. We had some money available in our funds from a grant we had received which paid for the plants.

How did you choose the area to garden and what was the aim for the action?

We looked around our local area for an area of neglected ground that we thought could be cheered up with planting. We were careful to take into account concerns such as whether it was an area that might get trampled by children or whether we were going to affect planting that was already in the area.

The aim of our group (The Canalside Environmental Group) is to promote sustainable lifestyles in our local area and help to develop a sense of community.
The Group and its activities are led and managed by volunteers. With all our events we actively encourage newcomers to take an active role. We have grown from an initial meeting of 6 people to a community action group with an ever-expanding mailing list.
The group is inclusive to all members of our community and includes support for the local primary school .We welcome anyone with a passion for local environmental change.
The Canalside Environment Group was formed in November 2005 originally to cover the Waterways, Waterside and Aristotle Lane developments that lie along the canal in North Oxford. As interest in the group has grown locally it has expanded to include the surrounding areas of North Oxford to the west of Woodstock Road.
Local actions initiated by the group include: installing a household battery battery-recycling box outside Phil and Jim School, the production of a Local Food Sourcing Leaflet, to promoting the benefits of cycling, both for the environment and personal health. The group is on a mission to encourage environmental action from the grass roots.

GG2

The list of actions they have initiated is certainly admirable. Past events include campaigning to reduce packaging outside Marks and Spencers, to a wildlife walkabout the aim of which is to increase the local communities knowledge of the surrounding wildlife and what can be done to protect the ecosystem.
Other events organised by the environmental volunteers of North Oxford include Christmas Tree Shredding. A simple idea that involves encouraging residents to take chippings back to their gardens or donate the mulche to local allotment holders.
My favourite events are as always the Swap Shops. Where else would I have found my drill and electric screwdriver (for free!) that has provided invaluable during the construction of my degree show at Goldsmiths? Or mourn over the missed opportunity of a hat stand that was swiftly nabbed as soon as it entered the local village hall.
The Swap Shops are now held four times a year in St Margaret’s Institute. They are definitely worth a trip.
The Canalside Environmental group is also rather fantastic at keeping the North Oxford area free of litter picking. Before the Guerillia Garding, the group organised guerilla litter picking, where a team of volunteers would descend on mass to the resident’s estates blitzing them of any rubbish. Whilst at the same time holding composting workshops to push local residents towards the idea of starting their own composts in their back gardens.
As of yet, the group has had no scrapes with the Law. However it is rumoured that the estate managers are not happy with this simple act of creating a more enjoyable landscape for the residents.

GG3

Are you looking to involve more people?

We have only guerilla gardened once so far and there were 3 people involved. We will certainly get more members involved next time.

Do you plan on repeating the action? What has the response been towards the action from the local community?

Yes – as CEG is centered in the new housing developments we have limited scope for guerilla gardening in this area. We think it is such a good idea however that we plan to look elsewhere in Oxford for other sites – probably supporting other community groups.

There has been no reaction yet from the local community because we planted bulbs so they have not appeared yet. I would not expect to hear much response anyway. We didn’t plant a ‘sea’ of daffodils for instance so I think it is more than likely that when our flowers arrive in the spring they will bring a smile to people’s faces and cheer up their day, rather than provoking much reaction.

Our little plum tree is looking well though. We planted it so it would bear fruit for the community in years to come. The grounds maintenance people have been in recently with a strimmer but our little tree has been spared. However THEY are probably wondering where it came from!

Finally, what are your thoughts regarding transition towns? To your knowledge has Oxford looked into becoming one?

Transition Oxford has wound down and folded recently. I think the transition town’s idea is great, however I don’t think a place the size of Oxford, with such a transient population, is quite ready for it.
It is a massive project for a group of volunteers to take on in a town of this size. I think it might work better in a smaller town.
Also, the concept of peak oil is quite central to them and, although I myself am a firm believer in the peak oil concern, I think many people don’t really ‘get it’ yet. CO2 is hard enough to grasp!

Has there been any resistance to the gardening action?

There was some resistance from the local management committee when they inadvertently heard what we were doing because they were concerned we would upset planting plans for the development. We chose our planting area carefully and just went ahead without telling them! That’s what guerilla gardening is all about!
Earlier this year, symptoms The Canalside Environment Group initiated an act of guerilla gardening in a North Oxford resident’s estate. Amelia’s Magazine spoke to Moira regarding the reasons behind the action.

GG1

How and where did the idea for the Guerilla Gardening come about?

One of our members read about the concept and brought the idea to the group. We are an environmental action group and loved the idea of not waiting for the ‘authorities’ to brighten up wasteland areas. Instead taking it into our own hands by doing something to brighten up an area for the community.

We chose to plant bulbs as we like the idea of them emerging in the spring with many people enjoying them but not knowing how they got there. We also planted a fruit tree that in time we hope will yield fruit that can be picked and shared by the local community. We had some money available in our funds from a grant we had received which paid for the plants.

How did you choose the area to garden and what was the aim for the action?

We looked around our local area for an area of neglected ground that we thought could be cheered up with planting. We were careful to take into account concerns such as whether it was an area that might get trampled by children or whether we were going to affect planting that was already in the area.

The aim of our group (The Canalside Environmental Group) is to promote sustainable lifestyles in our local area and help to develop a sense of community.
The Group and its activities are led and managed by volunteers. With all our events we actively encourage newcomers to take an active role. We have grown from an initial meeting of 6 people to a community action group with an ever-expanding mailing list.
The group is inclusive to all members of our community and includes support for the local primary school .We welcome anyone with a passion for local environmental change.
The Canalside Environment Group was formed in November 2005 originally to cover the Waterways, dosage Waterside and Aristotle Lane developments that lie along the canal in North Oxford. As interest in the group has grown locally it has expanded to include the surrounding areas of North Oxford to the west of Woodstock Road.
Local actions initiated by the group include: installing a household battery battery-recycling box outside Phil and Jim School, the production of a Local Food Sourcing Leaflet, to promoting the benefits of cycling, both for the environment and personal health. The group is on a mission to encourage environmental action from the grass roots.

GG2

The list of actions they have initiated is certainly admirable. Past events include campaigning to reduce packaging outside Marks and Spencers, to a wildlife walkabout the aim of which is to increase the local communities knowledge of the surrounding wildlife and what can be done to protect the ecosystem.
Other events organised by the environmental volunteers of North Oxford include Christmas Tree Shredding. A simple idea that involves encouraging residents to take chippings back to their gardens or donate the mulche to local allotment holders.
My favourite events are as always the Swap Shops. Where else would I have found my drill and electric screwdriver (for free!) that has provided invaluable during the construction of my degree show at Goldsmiths? Or mourn over the missed opportunity of a hat stand that was swiftly nabbed as soon as it entered the local village hall.
The Swap Shops are now held four times a year in St Margaret’s Institute. They are definitely worth a trip.
The Canalside Environmental group is also rather fantastic at keeping the North Oxford area free of litter picking. Before the Guerillia Garding, the group organised guerilla litter picking, where a team of volunteers would descend on mass to the resident’s estates blitzing them of any rubbish. Whilst at the same time holding composting workshops to push local residents towards the idea of starting their own composts in their back gardens.
As of yet, the group has had no scrapes with the Law. However it is rumoured that the estate managers are not happy with this simple act of creating a more enjoyable landscape for the residents.

GG3

Are you looking to involve more people?

We have only guerilla gardened once so far and there were 3 people involved. We will certainly get more members involved next time.

Do you plan on repeating the action? What has the response been towards the action from the local community?

Yes – as CEG is centered in the new housing developments we have limited scope for guerilla gardening in this area. We think it is such a good idea however that we plan to look elsewhere in Oxford for other sites – probably supporting other community groups.

There has been no reaction yet from the local community because we planted bulbs so they have not appeared yet. I would not expect to hear much response anyway. We didn’t plant a ‘sea’ of daffodils for instance so I think it is more than likely that when our flowers arrive in the spring they will bring a smile to people’s faces and cheer up their day, rather than provoking much reaction.

Our little plum tree is looking well though. We planted it so it would bear fruit for the community in years to come. The grounds maintenance people have been in recently with a strimmer but our little tree has been spared. However THEY are probably wondering where it came from!

Finally, what are your thoughts regarding transition towns? To your knowledge has Oxford looked into becoming one?

Transition Oxford has wound down and folded recently. I think the transition town’s idea is great, however I don’t think a place the size of Oxford, with such a transient population, is quite ready for it.
It is a massive project for a group of volunteers to take on in a town of this size. I think it might work better in a smaller town.
Also, the concept of peak oil is quite central to them and, although I myself am a firm believer in the peak oil concern, I think many people don’t really ‘get it’ yet. CO2 is hard enough to grasp!

Has there been any resistance to the gardening action?

There was some resistance from the local management committee when they inadvertently heard what we were doing because they were concerned we would upset planting plans for the development. We chose our planting area carefully and just went ahead without telling them! That’s what guerilla gardening is all about!
Earlier this year, treat The Canalside Environment Group initiated an act of guerilla gardening in a North Oxford resident’s estate. Amelia’s Magazine spoke to Moira regarding the reasons behind the action.

GG1

How and where did the idea for the Guerilla Gardening come about?

One of our members read about the concept and brought the idea to the group. We are an environmental action group and loved the idea of not waiting for the ‘authorities’ to brighten up wasteland areas. Instead taking it into our own hands by doing something to brighten up an area for the community.

We chose to plant bulbs as we like the idea of them emerging in the spring with many people enjoying them but not knowing how they got there. We also planted a fruit tree that in time we hope will yield fruit that can be picked and shared by the local community. We had some money available in our funds from a grant we had received which paid for the plants.

How did you choose the area to garden and what was the aim for the action?

We looked around our local area for an area of neglected ground that we thought could be cheered up with planting. We were careful to take into account concerns such as whether it was an area that might get trampled by children or whether we were going to affect planting that was already in the area.

The aim of our group (The Canalside Environmental Group) is to promote sustainable lifestyles in our local area and help to develop a sense of community.
The Group and its activities are led and managed by volunteers. With all our events we actively encourage newcomers to take an active role. We have grown from an initial meeting of 6 people to a community action group with an ever-expanding mailing list.
The group is inclusive to all members of our community and includes support for the local primary school .We welcome anyone with a passion for local environmental change.
The Canalside Environment Group was formed in November 2005 originally to cover the Waterways, store Waterside and Aristotle Lane developments that lie along the canal in North Oxford. As interest in the group has grown locally it has expanded to include the surrounding areas of North Oxford to the west of Woodstock Road.
Local actions initiated by the group include: installing a household battery battery-recycling box outside Phil and Jim School, side effects the production of a Local Food Sourcing Leaflet, to promoting the benefits of cycling, both for the environment and personal health. The group is on a mission to encourage environmental action from the grass roots.

GG2

The list of actions they have initiated is certainly admirable. Past events include campaigning to reduce packaging outside Marks and Spencers, to a wildlife walkabout the aim of which is to increase the local communities knowledge of the surrounding wildlife and what can be done to protect the ecosystem.
Other events organised by the environmental volunteers of North Oxford include Christmas Tree Shredding. A simple idea that involves encouraging residents to take chippings back to their gardens or donate the mulche to local allotment holders.
My favourite events are as always the Swap Shops. Where else would I have found my drill and electric screwdriver (for free!) that has provided invaluable during the construction of my degree show at Goldsmiths? Or mourn over the missed opportunity of a hat stand that was swiftly nabbed as soon as it entered the local village hall.
The Swap Shops are now held four times a year in St Margaret’s Institute. They are definitely worth a trip.
The Canalside Environmental group is also rather fantastic at keeping the North Oxford area free of litter picking. Before the Guerillia Garding, the group organised guerilla litter picking, where a team of volunteers would descend on mass to the resident’s estates blitzing them of any rubbish. Whilst at the same time holding composting workshops to push local residents towards the idea of starting their own composts in their back gardens.
As of yet, the group has had no scrapes with the Law. However it is rumoured that the estate managers are not happy with this simple act of creating a more enjoyable landscape for the residents.

GG3

Are you looking to involve more people?

We have only guerilla gardened once so far and there were 3 people involved. We will certainly get more members involved next time.

Do you plan on repeating the action? What has the response been towards the action from the local community?

Yes – as CEG is centered in the new housing developments we have limited scope for guerilla gardening in this area. We think it is such a good idea however that we plan to look elsewhere in Oxford for other sites – probably supporting other community groups.

There has been no reaction yet from the local community because we planted bulbs so they have not appeared yet. I would not expect to hear much response anyway. We didn’t plant a ‘sea’ of daffodils for instance so I think it is more than likely that when our flowers arrive in the spring they will bring a smile to people’s faces and cheer up their day, rather than provoking much reaction.

Our little plum tree is looking well though. We planted it so it would bear fruit for the community in years to come. The grounds maintenance people have been in recently with a strimmer but our little tree has been spared. However THEY are probably wondering where it came from!

Finally, what are your thoughts regarding transition towns? To your knowledge has Oxford looked into becoming one?

Transition Oxford has wound down and folded recently. I think the transition town’s idea is great, however I don’t think a place the size of Oxford, with such a transient population, is quite ready for it.
It is a massive project for a group of volunteers to take on in a town of this size. I think it might work better in a smaller town.
Also, the concept of peak oil is quite central to them and, although I myself am a firm believer in the peak oil concern, I think many people don’t really ‘get it’ yet. CO2 is hard enough to grasp!

Has there been any resistance to the gardening action?

There was some resistance from the local management committee when they inadvertently heard what we were doing because they were concerned we would upset planting plans for the development. We chose our planting area carefully and just went ahead without telling them! That’s what guerilla gardening is all about!
Earlier this year, buy The Canalside Environment Group initiated an act of guerilla gardening in a North Oxford resident’s estate. Amelia’s Magazine spoke to Moira regarding the reasons behind the action.

GG1

How and where did the idea for the Guerilla Gardening come about?

One of our members read about the concept and brought the idea to the group. We are an environmental action group and loved the idea of not waiting for the ‘authorities’ to brighten up wasteland areas. Instead taking it into our own hands by doing something to brighten up an area for the community.

We chose to plant bulbs as we like the idea of them emerging in the spring with many people enjoying them but not knowing how they got there. We also planted a fruit tree that in time we hope will yield fruit that can be picked and shared by the local community. We had some money available in our funds from a grant we had received which paid for the plants.

How did you choose the area to garden and what was the aim for the action?

We looked around our local area for an area of neglected ground that we thought could be cheered up with planting. We were careful to take into account concerns such as whether it was an area that might get trampled by children or whether we were going to affect planting that was already in the area.

The aim of our group (The Canalside Environmental Group) is to promote sustainable lifestyles in our local area and help to develop a sense of community.
The Group and its activities are led and managed by volunteers. With all our events we actively encourage newcomers to take an active role. We have grown from an initial meeting of 6 people to a community action group with an ever-expanding mailing list.
The group is inclusive to all members of our community and includes support for the local primary school .We welcome anyone with a passion for local environmental change.
The Canalside Environment Group was formed in November 2005 originally to cover the Waterways, for sale Waterside and Aristotle Lane developments that lie along the canal in North Oxford. As interest in the group has grown locally it has expanded to include the surrounding areas of North Oxford to the west of Woodstock Road.
Local actions initiated by the group include: installing a household battery battery-recycling box outside Phil and Jim School, no rx the production of a Local Food Sourcing Leaflet, to promoting the benefits of cycling, both for the environment and personal health. The group is on a mission to encourage environmental action from the grass roots.

GG2

The list of actions they have initiated is certainly admirable. Past events include campaigning to reduce packaging outside Marks and Spencers, to a wildlife walkabout the aim of which is to increase the local communities knowledge of the surrounding wildlife and what can be done to protect the ecosystem.
Other events organised by the environmental volunteers of North Oxford include Christmas Tree Shredding. A simple idea that involves encouraging residents to take chippings back to their gardens or donate the mulche to local allotment holders.
My favourite events are as always the Swap Shops. Where else would I have found my drill and electric screwdriver (for free!) that has provided invaluable during the construction of my degree show at Goldsmiths? Or mourn over the missed opportunity of a hat stand that was swiftly nabbed as soon as it entered the local village hall.
The Swap Shops are now held four times a year in St Margaret’s Institute. They are definitely worth a trip.
The Canalside Environmental group is also rather fantastic at keeping the North Oxford area free of litter picking. Before the Guerillia Garding, the group organised guerilla litter picking, where a team of volunteers would descend on mass to the resident’s estates blitzing them of any rubbish. Whilst at the same time holding composting workshops to push local residents towards the idea of starting their own composts in their back gardens.
As of yet, the group has had no scrapes with the Law. However it is rumoured that the estate managers are not happy with this simple act of creating a more enjoyable landscape for the residents.

GG3

Are you looking to involve more people?

We have only guerilla gardened once so far and there were 3 people involved. We will certainly get more members involved next time.

Do you plan on repeating the action? What has the response been towards the action from the local community?

Yes – as CEG is centered in the new housing developments we have limited scope for guerilla gardening in this area. We think it is such a good idea however that we plan to look elsewhere in Oxford for other sites – probably supporting other community groups.

There has been no reaction yet from the local community because we planted bulbs so they have not appeared yet. I would not expect to hear much response anyway. We didn’t plant a ‘sea’ of daffodils for instance so I think it is more than likely that when our flowers arrive in the spring they will bring a smile to people’s faces and cheer up their day, rather than provoking much reaction.

Our little plum tree is looking well though. We planted it so it would bear fruit for the community in years to come. The grounds maintenance people have been in recently with a strimmer but our little tree has been spared. However THEY are probably wondering where it came from!

Finally, what are your thoughts regarding transition towns? To your knowledge has Oxford looked into becoming one?

Transition Oxford has wound down and folded recently. I think the transition town’s idea is great, however I don’t think a place the size of Oxford, with such a transient population, is quite ready for it.
It is a massive project for a group of volunteers to take on in a town of this size. I think it might work better in a smaller town.
Also, the concept of peak oil is quite central to them and, although I myself am a firm believer in the peak oil concern, I think many people don’t really ‘get it’ yet. CO2 is hard enough to grasp!

Has there been any resistance to the gardening action?

There was some resistance from the local management committee when they inadvertently heard what we were doing because they were concerned we would upset planting plans for the development. We chose our planting area carefully and just went ahead without telling them! That’s what guerilla gardening is all about!
IMG_1393

Amelia’s Magazine has been heartily enjoying all the shortlisted books for this year’s Booker Prize, side effects which was announced last week: Hilary Mantel’s Wolf Hall scooped the award but all the books were really strong. The life of Amelia’s Magazine review copy can be seen in snapshot above.

Winner Wolf Hall was genuinely enjoyable read – unlike certain contemporary books, salve you never feel like you’re ploughing through something for your own good rather than for fun. The book covers the period when Henry VIIIth was attempting to divorce his first wife to marry Anne Boleyn; the main character Thomas Cromwell becomes deeply entwined in the politics, approved especially when his master Cardinal Wolsey falls from royal favour.

History novels are often a lot of fun but this is a lot more than a bodice-ripper: each character, plucked from history, feels real, from choirboy to King of England. The language manages to walk the fine line between being comprehensible to our modern ears and slipping into anachronism. The style is a joy to read but it’s easy to get lost as no concessions are made to slow brains: quite who is talking or what a reference might mean are often left unanswered in the text. But this is history after all, and each corner of Tudor London and every minor character edging onto the page enriches your understanding of the time. If that isn’t enough, you can always Google the person in question. Just don’t look up Thomas Cromwell on Wikipedia before you finish the book!

Looking back, history can see pre-ordained but Wolf Hall shows us the intricacies of living under a king, whose whims can be the difference between life and death for his subjects. At the same time, however, we see how his power was limited by social factors and how shocking it was to all of Europe when he took his marriage issues into his own hands.

glass room

The Glass Room by Simon Mawer focuses on the Second World War and the mass movements of people that occurred before and during it. A wealthy young couple commission a beautiful modernist house featuring the eponymous glass room, an innovative architectural feat that becomes a reflection of the changing social conventions of the time and the impending doom of its occupants.

The reader’s knowledge of history creates most of the large-scale plot tension, whilst Mawer concentrates on the tiny, secret relations between people living self-consciously “modern” lives. In the background an oppressive fear builds up and people are divided into those who look the changing times in the face and those who live in denial. The clear, unforgiving walls of the Glass Room reflect these faultlines. We know from the beginning that the special house survives the destructive power of Hitler but we have to wait to find out which characters do, and whose is the true love story of the book.

summertime

Summertime by JM Coetzee was an uncomfortable but interesting read. It is set between the years 1972 and 1977, the years in which Coetzee returned to South Africa from America under a cloud of suspicion (mainly from his family, who sneer at his chosen profession). The book is uncomfortable because it does not shy away from the writer’s apparently prickly persona, his callousness past and present that appears to colour his relationship with his father, and his difficulty with women. Set in the years when Coetzee was finding his feet as a writer, it feels as if the memoir is exploring the potential candidates for characters to feature in his later writing.

Rather than writing a straightforward memoir, Coetzee has opted to write from beyond the grave and to cast as protagonist not himself but a fictional biographer who explores these particular years. The book is split into five chapters, each of which is donated to a particular person the biographer has deemed worthy of interview, from a raiding of the now dead (I mentioned it was an uncomfortable interesting read) Coetzee’s notebooks. These five characters are two women with whom the writer has had failed relationships, his favourite cousin, a work colleague and a woman who appears to despise him from first sight.

The book is a brilliant insight into the writer’s power to bend and embellish everyday life into evocative fiction and the format highlights the unreliable nature of narration. Throughout the memoir the running theme appears not only to be the perception of Coetzee failing both as a man and an Afrikaaner, but the failure of South Africa at that time to deal with its past, present or future. For myself the most poignant aspect of the book was the constant invisible barrier of the apartheid that seeped into all aspects of everyday life, and how we misunderstand each other through personal dogmas about what constitutes a man, a writer, or a person.

quickening maze

The Quickening Maze by Adam Foulds is a tale of thwarted lives. The story concerns itself with articulate musing on the subtle lines between sanity and insanity. The book finds its setting in High Beech Asylum under the control of Dr Matthew Allen, who figures as a clear illustration of the aforementioned dividing line. The plot revolves around the shared time the poets John Clare and Lord Tennyson spent convalescing there, without ever really meeting.

John Clare is constantly referred to as the peasant poet, a lover of nature whose dramatic psychotic break appears to be the result of the Enclosures Act, which forbade the free wandering of the poor across previously open fields. As the book progresses, Clare dissolves completely into multiple personalities, with the only constant remaining his love of nature. In contrast Tennyson arrives at the asylum with his brother, both slipping into the morose depths that surrounded the family blood. Tennyson is drawn to the energetic Dr Allen and is soon embroiled in his half-baked schemes, which eventually (true to life) led to Tennyson’s family bankruptcy.

The book is a damning portrayal of the easily distracted doctor, who in his absence leaves the running of the asylum to his right-hand-man Stockdale, who uses the patients’ mania to hide his acts of rape and physical violence and an easily abused care system.

the little stranger

The Children’s Book by AS Byatt and The Little Stranger by Sarah Waters sound fantastic but sadly seem to have gotten lost in the post. Your dedicated Amelia’s interns work pretty much 7 days a week so we haven’t had time to go to the library to check out these no doubt exceptional books. Therefore we encourage you to review them in the comments for us.

childrens-book
Earlier this year, pills The Canalside Environment Group initiated an act of guerilla gardening in a North Oxford resident’s estate. Amelia’s Magazine spoke to Moira regarding the reasons behind the action.

GG1

How and where did the idea for the Guerilla Gardening come about?

One of our members read about the concept and brought the idea to the group. We are an environmental action group and loved the idea of not waiting for the ‘authorities’ to brighten up wasteland areas. Instead taking it into our own hands by doing something to brighten up an area for the community.

We chose to plant bulbs as we like the idea of them emerging in the spring with many people enjoying them but not knowing how they got there. We also planted a fruit tree that in time we hope will yield fruit that can be picked and shared by the local community. We had some money available in our funds from a grant we had received which paid for the plants.

How did you choose the area to garden and what was the aim for the action?

We looked around our local area for an area of neglected ground that we thought could be cheered up with planting. We were careful to take into account concerns such as whether it was an area that might get trampled by children or whether we were going to affect planting that was already in the area.

The aim of our group (The Canalside Environmental Group) is to promote sustainable lifestyles in our local area and help to develop a sense of community.
The Group and its activities are led and managed by volunteers. With all our events we actively encourage newcomers to take an active role. We have grown from an initial meeting of 6 people to a community action group with an ever-expanding mailing list.
The group is inclusive to all members of our community and includes support for the local primary school .We welcome anyone with a passion for local environmental change.
The Canalside Environment Group was formed in November 2005 originally to cover the Waterways, Waterside and Aristotle Lane developments that lie along the canal in North Oxford. As interest in the group has grown locally it has expanded to include the surrounding areas of North Oxford to the west of Woodstock Road.
Local actions initiated by the group include: installing a household battery battery-recycling box outside Phil and Jim School, the production of a Local Food Sourcing Leaflet, to promoting the benefits of cycling, both for the environment and personal health. The group is on a mission to encourage environmental action from the grass roots.

GG2

The list of actions they have initiated is certainly admirable. Past events include campaigning to reduce packaging outside Marks and Spencers, to a wildlife walkabout the aim of which is to increase the local communities knowledge of the surrounding wildlife and what can be done to protect the ecosystem.
Other events organised by the environmental volunteers of North Oxford include Christmas Tree Shredding. A simple idea that involves encouraging residents to take chippings back to their gardens or donate the mulche to local allotment holders.
My favourite events are as always the Swap Shops. Where else would I have found my drill and electric screwdriver (for free!) that has provided invaluable during the construction of my degree show at Goldsmiths? Or mourn over the missed opportunity of a hat stand that was swiftly nabbed as soon as it entered the local village hall.
The Swap Shops are now held four times a year in St Margaret’s Institute. They are definitely worth a trip.
The Canalside Environmental group is also rather fantastic at keeping the North Oxford area free of litter picking. Before the Guerillia Garding, the group organised guerilla litter picking, where a team of volunteers would descend on mass to the resident’s estates blitzing them of any rubbish. Whilst at the same time holding composting workshops to push local residents towards the idea of starting their own composts in their back gardens.
As of yet, the group has had no scrapes with the Law. However it is rumoured that the estate managers are not happy with this simple act of creating a more enjoyable landscape for the residents.

GG3

Are you looking to involve more people?

We have only guerilla gardened once so far and there were 3 people involved. We will certainly get more members involved next time.

Do you plan on repeating the action? What has the response been towards the action from the local community?

Yes – as CEG is centered in the new housing developments we have limited scope for guerilla gardening in this area. We think it is such a good idea however that we plan to look elsewhere in Oxford for other sites – probably supporting other community groups.

There has been no reaction yet from the local community because we planted bulbs so they have not appeared yet. I would not expect to hear much response anyway. We didn’t plant a ‘sea’ of daffodils for instance so I think it is more than likely that when our flowers arrive in the spring they will bring a smile to people’s faces and cheer up their day, rather than provoking much reaction.

Our little plum tree is looking well though. We planted it so it would bear fruit for the community in years to come. The grounds maintenance people have been in recently with a strimmer but our little tree has been spared. However THEY are probably wondering where it came from!

Finally, what are your thoughts regarding transition towns? To your knowledge has Oxford looked into becoming one?

Transition Oxford has wound down and folded recently. I think the transition town’s idea is great, however I don’t think a place the size of Oxford, with such a transient population, is quite ready for it.
It is a massive project for a group of volunteers to take on in a town of this size. I think it might work better in a smaller town.
Also, the concept of peak oil is quite central to them and, although I myself am a firm believer in the peak oil concern, I think many people don’t really ‘get it’ yet. CO2 is hard enough to grasp!

Has there been any resistance to the gardening action?

There was some resistance from the local management committee when they inadvertently heard what we were doing because they were concerned we would upset planting plans for the development. We chose our planting area carefully and just went ahead without telling them! That’s what guerilla gardening is all about!
Earlier this year, prescription The Canalside Environment Group initiated an act of guerilla gardening in a North Oxford resident’s estate. Amelia’s Magazine spoke to Moira regarding the reasons behind the action.

GG1

How and where did the idea for the Guerilla Gardening come about?

One of our members read about the concept and brought the idea to the group. We are an environmental action group and loved the idea of not waiting for the ‘authorities’ to brighten up wasteland areas. Instead taking it into our own hands by doing something to brighten up an area for the community.

We chose to plant bulbs as we like the idea of them emerging in the spring with many people enjoying them but not knowing how they got there. We also planted a fruit tree that in time we hope will yield fruit that can be picked and shared by the local community. We had some money available in our funds from a grant we had received which paid for the plants.

How did you choose the area to garden and what was the aim for the action?

We looked around our local area for an area of neglected ground that we thought could be cheered up with planting. We were careful to take into account concerns such as whether it was an area that might get trampled by children or whether we were going to affect planting that was already in the area.

The aim of our group (The Canalside Environmental Group) is to promote sustainable lifestyles in our local area and help to develop a sense of community.
The Group and its activities are led and managed by volunteers. With all our events we actively encourage newcomers to take an active role. We have grown from an initial meeting of 6 people to a community action group with an ever-expanding mailing list.
The group is inclusive to all members of our community and includes support for the local primary school. We welcome anyone with a passion for local environmental change.

GG2

The Canalside Environment Group was formed in November 2005 originally to cover the Waterways, abortion Waterside and Aristotle Lane developments that lie along the canal in North Oxford. As interest in the group has grown locally it has expanded to include the surrounding areas of North Oxford to the west of Woodstock Road.
Local actions initiated by the group include: installing a household battery battery-recycling box outside Phil and Jim School, the production of a Local Food Sourcing Leaflet, to promoting the benefits of cycling, both for the environment and personal health. The group is on a mission to encourage environmental action from the grass roots.

The list of actions they have initiated is certainly admirable. Past events include campaigning to reduce packaging outside Marks and Spencers, to a wildlife walkabout the aim of which is to increase the local communities knowledge of the surrounding wildlife and what can be done to protect the ecosystem.
Other events organised by the environmental volunteers of North Oxford include Christmas Tree Shredding. A simple idea that involves encouraging residents to take chippings back to their gardens or donate the mulche to local allotment holders.
My favourite events are as always the Swap Shops. Where else would I have found my drill and electric screwdriver (for free!) that has provided invaluable during the construction of my degree show at Goldsmiths? Or mourn over the missed opportunity of a hat stand that was swiftly nabbed as soon as it entered the local village hall.
The Swap Shops are now held four times a year in St Margaret’s Institute. They are definitely worth a trip.
The Canalside Environmental group is also rather fantastic at keeping the North Oxford area free of litter picking. Before the Guerillia Garding, the group organised guerilla litter picking, where a team of volunteers would descend on mass to the resident’s estates blitzing them of any rubbish. Whilst at the same time holding composting workshops to push local residents towards the idea of starting their own composts in their back gardens.
As of yet, the group has had no scrapes with the Law. However it is rumoured that the estate managers are not happy with this simple act of creating a more enjoyable landscape for the residents.

GG3

Are you looking to involve more people?

We have only guerilla gardened once so far and there were 3 people involved. We will certainly get more members involved next time.

Do you plan on repeating the action? What has the response been towards the action from the local community?

Yes – as CEG is centered in the new housing developments we have limited scope for guerilla gardening in this area. We think it is such a good idea however that we plan to look elsewhere in Oxford for other sites – probably supporting other community groups.

There has been no reaction yet from the local community because we planted bulbs so they have not appeared yet. I would not expect to hear much response anyway. We didn’t plant a ‘sea’ of daffodils for instance so I think it is more than likely that when our flowers arrive in the spring they will bring a smile to people’s faces and cheer up their day, rather than provoking much reaction.

Our little plum tree is looking well though. We planted it so it would bear fruit for the community in years to come. The grounds maintenance people have been in recently with a strimmer but our little tree has been spared. However THEY are probably wondering where it came from!

Finally, what are your thoughts regarding transition towns? To your knowledge has Oxford looked into becoming one?

Transition Oxford has wound down and folded recently. I think the transition town’s idea is great, however I don’t think a place the size of Oxford, with such a transient population, is quite ready for it.
It is a massive project for a group of volunteers to take on in a town of this size. I think it might work better in a smaller town.
Also, the concept of peak oil is quite central to them and, although I myself am a firm believer in the peak oil concern, I think many people don’t really ‘get it’ yet. CO2 is hard enough to grasp!

Has there been any resistance to the gardening action?

There was some resistance from the local management committee when they inadvertently heard what we were doing because they were concerned we would upset planting plans for the development. We chose our planting area carefully and just went ahead without telling them! That’s what guerilla gardening is all about!
Earlier this year, order The Canalside Environment Group initiated an act of guerilla gardening in a North Oxford resident’s estate. Amelia’s Magazine spoke to Moira regarding the reasons behind the action.

GG1

How and where did the idea for the Guerilla Gardening come about?

One of our members read about the concept and brought the idea to the group. We are an environmental action group and loved the idea of not waiting for the ‘authorities’ to brighten up wasteland areas. Instead taking it into our own hands by doing something to brighten up an area for the community.

We chose to plant bulbs as we like the idea of them emerging in the spring with many people enjoying them but not knowing how they got there. We also planted a fruit tree that in time we hope will yield fruit that can be picked and shared by the local community. We had some money available in our funds from a grant we had received which paid for the plants.

How did you choose the area to garden and what was the aim for the action?

We looked around our local area for an area of neglected ground that we thought could be cheered up with planting. We were careful to take into account concerns such as whether it was an area that might get trampled by children or whether we were going to affect planting that was already in the area.

The aim of our group (The Canalside Environmental Group) is to promote sustainable lifestyles in our local area and help to develop a sense of community.
The Group and its activities are led and managed by volunteers. With all our events we actively encourage newcomers to take an active role. We have grown from an initial meeting of 6 people to a community action group with an ever-expanding mailing list.
The group is inclusive to all members of our community and includes support for the local primary school. We welcome anyone with a passion for local environmental change.

GG2

The Canalside Environment Group was formed in November 2005 originally to cover the Waterways, Waterside and Aristotle Lane developments that lie along the canal in North Oxford. As interest in the group has grown locally it has expanded to include the surrounding areas of North Oxford to the west of Woodstock Road.
Local actions initiated by the group include: installing a household battery battery-recycling box outside Phil and Jim School, the production of a Local Food Sourcing Leaflet, to promoting the benefits of cycling, both for the environment and personal health. The group is on a mission to encourage environmental action from the grass roots.

The list of actions they have initiated is certainly admirable. Past events include campaigning to reduce packaging outside Marks and Spencers, to a wildlife walkabout the aim of which is to increase the local communities knowledge of the surrounding wildlife and what can be done to protect the ecosystem.
Other events organised by the environmental volunteers of North Oxford include Christmas Tree Shredding. A simple idea that involves encouraging residents to take chippings back to their gardens or donate the mulche to local allotment holders.
My favourite events are as always the Swap Shops. Where else would I have found my drill and electric screwdriver (for free!) that has provided invaluable during the construction of my degree show at Goldsmiths? Or mourn over the missed opportunity of a hat stand that was swiftly nabbed as soon as it entered the local village hall.
The Swap Shops are now held four times a year in St Margaret’s Institute. They are definitely worth a trip.
The Canalside Environmental group is also rather fantastic at keeping the North Oxford area free of litter picking. Before the Guerillia Garding, the group organised guerilla litter picking, where a team of volunteers would descend on mass to the resident’s estates blitzing them of any rubbish. Whilst at the same time holding composting workshops to push local residents towards the idea of starting their own composts in their back gardens.
As of yet, the group has had no scrapes with the Law. However it is rumoured that the estate managers are not happy with this simple act of creating a more enjoyable landscape for the residents.

GG3

Are you looking to involve more people?

We have only guerilla gardened once so far and there were 3 people involved. We will certainly get more members involved next time.

Do you plan on repeating the action? What has the response been towards the action from the local community?

Yes – as CEG is centered in the new housing developments we have limited scope for guerilla gardening in this area. We think it is such a good idea however that we plan to look elsewhere in Oxford for other sites – probably supporting other community groups.

There has been no reaction yet from the local community because we planted bulbs so they have not appeared yet. I would not expect to hear much response anyway. We didn’t plant a ‘sea’ of daffodils for instance so I think it is more than likely that when our flowers arrive in the spring they will bring a smile to people’s faces and cheer up their day, rather than provoking much reaction.

Our little plum tree is looking well though. We planted it so it would bear fruit for the community in years to come. The grounds maintenance people have been in recently with a strimmer but our little tree has been spared. However THEY are probably wondering where it came from!

Finally, what are your thoughts regarding transition towns? To your knowledge has Oxford looked into becoming one?

Transition Oxford has wound down and folded recently. I think the transition town’s idea is great, however I don’t think a place the size of Oxford, with such a transient population, is quite ready for it.
It is a massive project for a group of volunteers to take on in a town of this size. I think it might work better in a smaller town.
Also, the concept of peak oil is quite central to them and, although I myself am a firm believer in the peak oil concern, I think many people don’t really ‘get it’ yet. CO2 is hard enough to grasp!

Has there been any resistance to the gardening action?

There was some resistance from the local management committee when they inadvertently heard what we were doing because they were concerned we would upset planting plans for the development. We chose our planting area carefully and just went ahead without telling them! That’s what guerilla gardening is all about!
Earlier this year, sick The Canalside Environment Group initiated an act of guerilla gardening in a North Oxford resident’s estate. Amelia’s Magazine spoke to Moira regarding the reasons behind the action.

GG1

How and where did the idea for the Guerilla Gardening come about?

One of our members read about the concept and brought the idea to the group. We are an environmental action group and loved the idea of not waiting for the ‘authorities’ to brighten up wasteland areas. Instead taking it into our own hands by doing something to brighten up an area for the community.

We chose to plant bulbs as we like the idea of them emerging in the spring with many people enjoying them but not knowing how they got there. We also planted a fruit tree that in time we hope will yield fruit that can be picked and shared by the local community. We had some money available in our funds from a grant we had received which paid for the plants.

How did you choose the area to garden and what was the aim for the action?

We looked around our local area for an area of neglected ground that we thought could be cheered up with planting. We were careful to take into account concerns such as whether it was an area that might get trampled by children or whether we were going to affect planting that was already in the area.

The aim of our group is to promote sustainable lifestyles in our local area and help to develop a sense of community.The Group and its activities are led and managed by volunteers. With all our events we actively encourage newcomers to take an active role. We have grown from an initial meeting of 6 people to a community action group with an ever-expanding mailing list.
The group is inclusive to all members of our community and includes support for the local primary school. We welcome anyone with a passion for local environmental change.

GG2

The Canalside Environment Group was formed in November 2005 originally to cover the Waterways, Waterside and Aristotle Lane developments that lie along the canal in North Oxford. As interest in the group has grown locally it has expanded to include the surrounding areas of North Oxford to the west of Woodstock Road.
Local actions initiated by the group include: installing a household battery battery-recycling box outside Phil and Jim School, the production of a Local Food Sourcing Leaflet, to promoting the benefits of cycling, both for the environment and personal health. The group is on a mission to encourage environmental action from the grass roots.

The list of actions they have initiated is certainly admirable. Past events include campaigning to reduce packaging outside Marks and Spencers, to a wildlife walkabout the aim of which is to increase the local communities knowledge of the surrounding wildlife and what can be done to protect the ecosystem.
Other events organised by the environmental volunteers of North Oxford include Christmas Tree Shredding. A simple idea that involves encouraging residents to take chippings back to their gardens or donate the mulche to local allotment holders.
My favourite events are as always the Swap Shops. Where else would I have found my drill and electric screwdriver (for free!) that has provided invaluable during the construction of my degree show at Goldsmiths? Or mourn over the missed opportunity of a hat stand that was swiftly nabbed as soon as it entered the local village hall.
The Swap Shops are now held four times a year in St Margaret’s Institute. They are definitely worth a trip.
The Canalside Environmental group is also rather fantastic at keeping the North Oxford area free of litter picking. Before the Guerillia Garding, the group organised guerilla litter picking, where a team of volunteers would descend on mass to the resident’s estates blitzing them of any rubbish. Whilst at the same time holding composting workshops to push local residents towards the idea of starting their own composts in their back gardens.
As of yet, the group has had no scrapes with the Law. However it is rumoured that the estate managers are not happy with this simple act of creating a more enjoyable landscape for the residents.

GG3

Are you looking to involve more people?

We have only guerilla gardened once so far and there were 3 people involved. We will certainly get more members involved next time.

Do you plan on repeating the action? What has the response been towards the action from the local community?

Yes – as CEG is centered in the new housing developments we have limited scope for guerilla gardening in this area. We think it is such a good idea however that we plan to look elsewhere in Oxford for other sites – probably supporting other community groups.

There has been no reaction yet from the local community because we planted bulbs so they have not appeared yet. I would not expect to hear much response anyway. We didn’t plant a ‘sea’ of daffodils for instance so I think it is more than likely that when our flowers arrive in the spring they will bring a smile to people’s faces and cheer up their day, rather than provoking much reaction.

Our little plum tree is looking well though. We planted it so it would bear fruit for the community in years to come. The grounds maintenance people have been in recently with a strimmer but our little tree has been spared. However THEY are probably wondering where it came from!

Finally, what are your thoughts regarding transition towns? To your knowledge has Oxford looked into becoming one?

Transition Oxford has wound down and folded recently. I think the transition town’s idea is great, however I don’t think a place the size of Oxford, with such a transient population, is quite ready for it.
It is a massive project for a group of volunteers to take on in a town of this size. I think it might work better in a smaller town.
Also, the concept of peak oil is quite central to them and, although I myself am a firm believer in the peak oil concern, I think many people don’t really ‘get it’ yet. CO2 is hard enough to grasp!

Has there been any resistance to the gardening action?

There was some resistance from the local management committee when they inadvertently heard what we were doing because they were concerned we would upset planting plans for the development. We chose our planting area carefully and just went ahead without telling them! That’s what guerilla gardening is all about!
Earlier this year, healing The Canalside Environment Groupguerilla gardening in a North Oxford resident’s estate. Amelia’s Magazine spoke to Moira regarding the reasons behind the action.

GG1

How and where did the idea for the Guerilla Gardening come about?

One of our members read about the concept and brought the idea to the group. We are an environmental action group and loved the idea of not waiting for the ‘authorities’ to brighten up wasteland areas. Instead taking it into our own hands by doing something to brighten up an area for the community.

We chose to plant bulbs as we like the idea of them emerging in the spring with many people enjoying them but not knowing how they got there. We also planted a fruit tree that in time we hope will yield fruit that can be picked and shared by the local community. We had some money available in our funds from a grant we had received which paid for the plants.

How did you choose the area to garden and what was the aim for the action?

We looked around our local area for an area of neglected ground that we thought could be cheered up with planting. We were careful to take into account concerns such as whether it was an area that might get trampled by children or whether we were going to affect planting that was already in the area.

The aim of our group is to promote sustainable lifestyles in our local area and help to develop a sense of community.The Group and its activities are led and managed by volunteers. With all our events we actively encourage newcomers to take an active role. We have grown from an initial meeting of 6 people to a community action group with an ever-expanding mailing list.
The group is inclusive to all members of our community and includes support for the local primary school. We welcome anyone with a passion for local environmental change.

GG2

The Canalside Environment Group was formed in November 2005 originally to cover the Waterways, viagra 100mg Waterside and Aristotle Lane developments that lie along the canal in North Oxford. As interest in the group has grown locally it has expanded to include the surrounding areas of North Oxford to the west of Woodstock Road.
Local actions initiated by the group include: installing a household battery battery-recycling box outside Phil and Jim School, the production of a Local Food Sourcing Leaflet, to promoting the benefits of cycling, both for the environment and personal health. The group is on a mission to encourage environmental action from the grass roots.

The list of actions they have initiated is certainly admirable. Past events include campaigning to reduce packaging outside Marks and Spencers, to a wildlife walkabout the aim of which is to increase the local communities knowledge of the surrounding wildlife and what can be done to protect the ecosystem.
Other events organised by the environmental volunteers of North Oxford include Christmas Tree Shredding. A simple idea that involves encouraging residents to take chippings back to their gardens or donate the mulche to local allotment holders.
My favourite events are as always the Swap Shops. Where else would I have found my drill and electric screwdriver (for free!) that has provided invaluable during the construction of my degree show at Goldsmiths? Or mourn over the missed opportunity of a hat stand that was swiftly nabbed as soon as it entered the local village hall.
The Swap Shops are now held four times a year in St Margaret’s Institute. They are definitely worth a trip.
The Canalside Environmental group is also rather fantastic at keeping the North Oxford area free of litter picking. Before the Guerillia Garding, the group organised guerilla litter picking, where a team of volunteers would descend on mass to the resident’s estates blitzing them of any rubbish. Whilst at the same time holding composting workshops to push local residents towards the idea of starting their own composts in their back gardens.
As of yet, the group has had no scrapes with the Law. However it is rumoured that the estate managers are not happy with this simple act of creating a more enjoyable landscape for the residents.

GG3

Are you looking to involve more people?

We have only guerilla gardened once so far and there were 3 people involved. We will certainly get more members involved next time.

Do you plan on repeating the action? What has the response been towards the action from the local community?

Yes – as CEG is centered in the new housing developments we have limited scope for guerilla gardening in this area. We think it is such a good idea however that we plan to look elsewhere in Oxford for other sites – probably supporting other community groups.

There has been no reaction yet from the local community because we planted bulbs so they have not appeared yet. I would not expect to hear much response anyway. We didn’t plant a ‘sea’ of daffodils for instance so I think it is more than likely that when our flowers arrive in the spring they will bring a smile to people’s faces and cheer up their day, rather than provoking much reaction.

Our little plum tree is looking well though. We planted it so it would bear fruit for the community in years to come. The grounds maintenance people have been in recently with a strimmer but our little tree has been spared. However THEY are probably wondering where it came from!

Finally, what are your thoughts regarding transition towns? To your knowledge has Oxford looked into becoming one?

Transition Oxford has wound down and folded recently. I think the transition town’s idea is great, however I don’t think a place the size of Oxford, with such a transient population, is quite ready for it.
It is a massive project for a group of volunteers to take on in a town of this size. I think it might work better in a smaller town.
Also, the concept of peak oil is quite central to them and, although I myself am a firm believer in the peak oil concern, I think many people don’t really ‘get it’ yet. CO2 is hard enough to grasp!

Has there been any resistance to the gardening action?

There was some resistance from the local management committee when they inadvertently heard what we were doing because they were concerned we would upset planting plans for the development. We chose our planting area carefully and just went ahead without telling them! That’s what guerilla gardening is all about!
Earlier this year, link The Canalside Environment Groupguerilla gardening in a North Oxford resident’s estate. Amelia’s Magazine spoke to Moira regarding the reasons behind the action.

GG1

How and where did the idea for the Guerilla Gardening come about?

One of our members read about the concept and brought the idea to the group. We are an environmental action group and loved the idea of not waiting for the ‘authorities’ to brighten up wasteland areas. Instead taking it into our own hands by doing something to brighten up an area for the community.

We chose to plant bulbs as we like the idea of them emerging in the spring with many people enjoying them but not knowing how they got there. We also planted a fruit tree that in time we hope will yield fruit that can be picked and shared by the local community. We had some money available in our funds from a grant we had received which paid for the plants.

How did you choose the area to garden and what was the aim for the action?

We looked around our local area for an area of neglected ground that we thought could be cheered up with planting. We were careful to take into account concerns such as whether it was an area that might get trampled by children or whether we were going to affect planting that was already in the area.

The aim of our group (The Canalside Environment GroupGG2

The Canalside Environment Group was formed in November 2005 originally to cover the Waterways, store Waterside and Aristotle Lane developments that lie along the canal in North Oxford. As interest in the group has grown locally it has expanded to include the surrounding areas of North Oxford to the west of Woodstock Road.
Local actions initiated by the group include: installing a household battery battery-recycling box outside Phil and Jim School, pharmacy the production of a Local Food Sourcing Leaflet, to promoting the benefits of cycling, both for the environment and personal health. The group is on a mission to encourage environmental action from the grass roots.

The list of actions they have initiated is certainly admirable. Past events include campaigning to reduce packaging outside Marks and Spencers, to a wildlife walkabout the aim of which is to increase the local communities knowledge of the surrounding wildlife and what can be done to protect the ecosystem.
Other events organised by the environmental volunteers of North Oxford include Christmas Tree Shredding. A simple idea that involves encouraging residents to take chippings back to their gardens or donate the mulche to local allotment holders.
My favourite events are as always the Swap Shops. Where else would I have found my drill and electric screwdriver (for free!) that has provided invaluable during the construction of my degree show at Goldsmiths? Or mourn over the missed opportunity of a hat stand that was swiftly nabbed as soon as it entered the local village hall.
The Swap Shops are now held four times a year in St Margaret’s Institute. They are definitely worth a trip.
The Canalside Environmental group is also rather fantastic at keeping the North Oxford area free of litter picking. Before the Guerillia Garding, the group organised guerilla litter picking, where a team of volunteers would descend on mass to the resident’s estates blitzing them of any rubbish. Whilst at the same time holding composting workshops to push local residents towards the idea of starting their own composts in their back gardens.
As of yet, the group has had no scrapes with the Law. However it is rumoured that the estate managers are not happy with this simple act of creating a more enjoyable landscape for the residents.

GG3

Are you looking to involve more people?

We have only guerilla gardened once so far and there were 3 people involved. We will certainly get more members involved next time.

Do you plan on repeating the action? What has the response been towards the action from the local community?

Yes – as CEG is centered in the new housing developments we have limited scope for guerilla gardening in this area. We think it is such a good idea however that we plan to look elsewhere in Oxford for other sites – probably supporting other community groups.

There has been no reaction yet from the local community because we planted bulbs so they have not appeared yet. I would not expect to hear much response anyway. We didn’t plant a ‘sea’ of daffodils for instance so I think it is more than likely that when our flowers arrive in the spring they will bring a smile to people’s faces and cheer up their day, rather than provoking much reaction.

Our little plum tree is looking well though. We planted it so it would bear fruit for the community in years to come. The grounds maintenance people have been in recently with a strimmer but our little tree has been spared. However THEY are probably wondering where it came from!

Finally, what are your thoughts regarding transition towns? To your knowledge has Oxford looked into becoming one?

Transition Oxford has wound down and folded recently. I think the transition town’s idea is great, however I don’t think a place the size of Oxford, with such a transient population, is quite ready for it.
It is a massive project for a group of volunteers to take on in a town of this size. I think it might work better in a smaller town.
Also, the concept of peak oil is quite central to them and, although I myself am a firm believer in the peak oil concern, I think many people don’t really ‘get it’ yet. CO2 is hard enough to grasp!

Has there been any resistance to the gardening action?

There was some resistance from the local management committee when they inadvertently heard what we were doing because they were concerned we would upset planting plans for the development. We chose our planting area carefully and just went ahead without telling them! That’s what guerilla gardening is all about!
Earlier this year, link The Canalside Environment Groupguerilla gardening in a North Oxford resident’s estate. Amelia’s Magazine spoke to Moira regarding the reasons behind the action.

GG1

How and where did the idea for the Guerilla Gardening come about?

One of our members read about the concept and brought the idea to the group. We are an environmental action group and loved the idea of not waiting for the ‘authorities’ to brighten up wasteland areas. Instead taking it into our own hands by doing something to brighten up an area for the community.

We chose to plant bulbs as we like the idea of them emerging in the spring with many people enjoying them but not knowing how they got there. We also planted a fruit tree that in time we hope will yield fruit that can be picked and shared by the local community. We had some money available in our funds from a grant we had received which paid for the plants.

How did you choose the area to garden and what was the aim for the action?

We looked around our local area for an area of neglected ground that we thought could be cheered up with planting. We were careful to take into account concerns such as whether it was an area that might get trampled by children or whether we were going to affect planting that was already in the area.

The aim of our group (The Canalside Environment GroupGG2

The Canalside Environment Group was formed in November 2005 originally to cover the Waterways, view Waterside and Aristotle Lane developments that lie along the canal in North Oxford. As interest in the group has grown locally it has expanded to include the surrounding areas of North Oxford to the west of Woodstock Road.
Local actions initiated by the group include: installing a household battery battery-recycling box outside Phil and Jim School, more about the production of a Local Food Sourcing Leaflet, to promoting the benefits of cycling, both for the environment and personal health. The group is on a mission to encourage environmental action from the grass roots.

The list of actions they have initiated is certainly admirable. Past events include campaigning to reduce packaging outside Marks and Spencers, to a wildlife walkabout the aim of which is to increase the local communities knowledge of the surrounding wildlife and what can be done to protect the ecosystem.
Other events organised by the environmental volunteers of North Oxford include Christmas Tree Shredding. A simple idea that involves encouraging residents to take chippings back to their gardens or donate the mulche to local allotment holders.
My favourite events are as always the Swap Shops. Where else would I have found my drill and electric screwdriver (for free!) that has provided invaluable during the construction of my degree show at Goldsmiths? Or mourn over the missed opportunity of a hat stand that was swiftly nabbed as soon as it entered the local village hall.
The Swap Shops are now held four times a year in St Margaret’s Institute. They are definitely worth a trip.
The Canalside Environmental group is also rather fantastic at keeping the North Oxford area free of litter picking. Before the Guerillia Garding, the group organised guerilla litter picking, where a team of volunteers would descend on mass to the resident’s estates blitzing them of any rubbish. Whilst at the same time holding composting workshops to push local residents towards the idea of starting their own composts in their back gardens.
As of yet, the group has had no scrapes with the Law. However it is rumoured that the estate managers are not happy with this simple act of creating a more enjoyable landscape for the residents.

GG3

Are you looking to involve more people?

We have only guerilla gardened once so far and there were 3 people involved. We will certainly get more members involved next time.

Do you plan on repeating the action? What has the response been towards the action from the local community?

Yes – as CEG is centered in the new housing developments we have limited scope for guerilla gardening in this area. We think it is such a good idea however that we plan to look elsewhere in Oxford for other sites – probably supporting other community groups.

There has been no reaction yet from the local community because we planted bulbs so they have not appeared yet. I would not expect to hear much response anyway. We didn’t plant a ‘sea’ of daffodils for instance so I think it is more than likely that when our flowers arrive in the spring they will bring a smile to people’s faces and cheer up their day, rather than provoking much reaction.

Our little plum tree is looking well though. We planted it so it would bear fruit for the community in years to come. The grounds maintenance people have been in recently with a strimmer but our little tree has been spared. However THEY are probably wondering where it came from!

Finally, what are your thoughts regarding transition towns? To your knowledge has Oxford looked into becoming one?

Transition Oxford has wound down and folded recently. I think the transition town’s idea is great, however I don’t think a place the size of Oxford, with such a transient population, is quite ready for it.
It is a massive project for a group of volunteers to take on in a town of this size. I think it might work better in a smaller town.
Also, the concept of peak oil is quite central to them and, although I myself am a firm believer in the peak oil concern, I think many people don’t really ‘get it’ yet. CO2 is hard enough to grasp!

Has there been any resistance to the gardening action?

There was some resistance from the local management committee when they inadvertently heard what we were doing because they were concerned we would upset planting plans for the development. We chose our planting area carefully and just went ahead without telling them! That’s what guerilla gardening is all about!
Earlier this year, website like this The Canalside Environment Groupguerilla gardening in a North Oxford resident’s estate. Amelia’s Magazine spoke to Moira regarding the reasons behind the action.

GG1

How and where did the idea for the Guerilla Gardening come about?

One of our members read about the concept and brought the idea to the group. We are an environmental action group and loved the idea of not waiting for the ‘authorities’ to brighten up wasteland areas. Instead taking it into our own hands by doing something to brighten up an area for the community.

We chose to plant bulbs as we like the idea of them emerging in the spring with many people enjoying them but not knowing how they got there. We also planted a fruit tree that in time we hope will yield fruit that can be picked and shared by the local community. We had some money available in our funds from a grant we had received which paid for the plants.

How did you choose the area to garden and what was the aim for the action?

We looked around our local area for an area of neglected ground that we thought could be cheered up with planting. We were careful to take into account concerns such as whether it was an area that might get trampled by children or whether we were going to affect planting that was already in the area.

The aim of our group The Canalside Environment GroupGG2

The Canalside Environment Group was formed in November 2005 originally to cover the Waterways, this Waterside and Aristotle Lane developments that lie along the canal in North Oxford. As interest in the group has grown locally it has expanded to include the surrounding areas of North Oxford to the west of Woodstock Road.
Local actions initiated by the group include: installing a household battery battery-recycling box outside Phil and Jim School, and the production of a Local Food Sourcing Leaflet, to promoting the benefits of cycling, both for the environment and personal health. The group is on a mission to encourage environmental action from the grass roots.

The list of actions they have initiated is certainly admirable. Past events include campaigning to reduce packaging outside Marks and Spencers, to a wildlife walkabout the aim of which is to increase the local communities knowledge of the surrounding wildlife and what can be done to protect the ecosystem.
Other events organised by the environmental volunteers of North Oxford include Christmas Tree Shredding. A simple idea that involves encouraging residents to take chippings back to their gardens or donate the mulche to local allotment holders.
My favourite events are as always the Swap Shops. Where else would I have found my drill and electric screwdriver (for free!) that has provided invaluable during the construction of my degree show at Goldsmiths? Or mourn over the missed opportunity of a hat stand that was swiftly nabbed as soon as it entered the local village hall.
The Swap Shops are now held four times a year in St Margaret’s Institute. They are definitely worth a trip.
The Canalside Environmental group is also rather fantastic at keeping the North Oxford area free of litter picking. Before the Guerillia Garding, the group organised guerilla litter picking, where a team of volunteers would descend on mass to the resident’s estates blitzing them of any rubbish. Whilst at the same time holding composting workshops to push local residents towards the idea of starting their own composts in their back gardens.
As of yet, the group has had no scrapes with the Law. However it is rumoured that the estate managers are not happy with this simple act of creating a more enjoyable landscape for the residents.

GG3

Are you looking to involve more people?

We have only guerilla gardened once so far and there were 3 people involved. We will certainly get more members involved next time.

Do you plan on repeating the action? What has the response been towards the action from the local community?

Yes – as CEG is centered in the new housing developments we have limited scope for guerilla gardening in this area. We think it is such a good idea however that we plan to look elsewhere in Oxford for other sites – probably supporting other community groups.

There has been no reaction yet from the local community because we planted bulbs so they have not appeared yet. I would not expect to hear much response anyway. We didn’t plant a ‘sea’ of daffodils for instance so I think it is more than likely that when our flowers arrive in the spring they will bring a smile to people’s faces and cheer up their day, rather than provoking much reaction.

Our little plum tree is looking well though. We planted it so it would bear fruit for the community in years to come. The grounds maintenance people have been in recently with a strimmer but our little tree has been spared. However THEY are probably wondering where it came from!

Finally, what are your thoughts regarding transition towns? To your knowledge has Oxford looked into becoming one?

Transition Oxford has wound down and folded recently. I think the transition town’s idea is great, however I don’t think a place the size of Oxford, with such a transient population, is quite ready for it.
It is a massive project for a group of volunteers to take on in a town of this size. I think it might work better in a smaller town.
Also, the concept of peak oil is quite central to them and, although I myself am a firm believer in the peak oil concern, I think many people don’t really ‘get it’ yet. CO2 is hard enough to grasp!

Has there been any resistance to the gardening action?

There was some resistance from the local management committee when they inadvertently heard what we were doing because they were concerned we would upset planting plans for the development. We chose our planting area carefully and just went ahead without telling them! That’s what guerilla gardening is all about!
Earlier this year, information pills The Canalside Environment Groupguerilla gardening in a North Oxford resident’s estate. Amelia’s Magazine spoke to Moira regarding the reasons behind the action.

GG1

How and where did the idea for the Guerilla Gardening come about?

One of our members read about the concept and brought the idea to the group. We are an environmental action group and loved the idea of not waiting for the ‘authorities’ to brighten up wasteland areas. Instead taking it into our own hands by doing something to brighten up an area for the community.

We chose to plant bulbs as we like the idea of them emerging in the spring with many people enjoying them but not knowing how they got there. We also planted a fruit tree that in time we hope will yield fruit that can be picked and shared by the local community. We had some money available in our funds from a grant we had received which paid for the plants.

How did you choose the area to garden and what was the aim for the action?

We looked around our local area for an area of neglected ground that we thought could be cheered up with planting. We were careful to take into account concerns such as whether it was an area that might get trampled by children or whether we were going to affect planting that was already in the area.

The aim of our group The Canalside Environment GroupGG2

The Canalside Environment Group was formed in November 2005 originally to cover the Waterways, price Waterside and Aristotle Lane developments that lie along the canal in North Oxford. As interest in the group has grown locally it has expanded to include the surrounding areas of North Oxford to the west of Woodstock Road.
Local actions initiated by the group include: installing a household battery battery-recycling box outside Phil and Jim School, the production of a Local Food Sourcing Leaflet, to promoting the benefits of cycling, both for the environment and personal health. The group is on a mission to encourage environmental action from the grass roots.

The list of actions they have initiated is certainly admirable. Past events include campaigning to reduce packaging outside Marks and Spencers, to a wildlife walkabout the aim of which is to increase the local communities knowledge of the surrounding wildlife and what can be done to protect the ecosystem.
Other events organised by the environmental volunteers of North Oxford include Christmas Tree Shredding. A simple idea that involves encouraging residents to take chippings back to their gardens or donate the mulche to local allotment holders.
My favourite events are as always the Swap Shops. Where else would I have found my drill and electric screwdriver (for free!) that has provided invaluable during the construction of my degree show at Goldsmiths? Or mourn over the missed opportunity of a hat stand that was swiftly nabbed as soon as it entered the local village hall.
The Swap Shops are now held four times a year in St Margaret’s Institute. They are definitely worth a trip.
The Canalside Environmental group is also rather fantastic at keeping the North Oxford area free of litter picking. Before the Guerillia Garding, the group organised guerilla litter picking, where a team of volunteers would descend on mass to the resident’s estates blitzing them of any rubbish. Whilst at the same time holding composting workshops to push local residents towards the idea of starting their own composts in their back gardens.
As of yet, the group has had no scrapes with the Law. However it is rumoured that the estate managers are not happy with this simple act of creating a more enjoyable landscape for the residents.

GG3

Are you looking to involve more people?

We have only guerilla gardened once so far and there were 3 people involved. We will certainly get more members involved next time.

Do you plan on repeating the action? What has the response been towards the action from the local community?

Yes – as CEG is centered in the new housing developments we have limited scope for guerilla gardening in this area. We think it is such a good idea however that we plan to look elsewhere in Oxford for other sites – probably supporting other community groups.

There has been no reaction yet from the local community because we planted bulbs so they have not appeared yet. I would not expect to hear much response anyway. We didn’t plant a ‘sea’ of daffodils for instance so I think it is more than likely that when our flowers arrive in the spring they will bring a smile to people’s faces and cheer up their day, rather than provoking much reaction.

Our little plum tree is looking well though. We planted it so it would bear fruit for the community in years to come. The grounds maintenance people have been in recently with a strimmer but our little tree has been spared. However THEY are probably wondering where it came from!

Finally, what are your thoughts regarding transition towns? To your knowledge has Oxford looked into becoming one?

Transition Oxford has wound down and folded recently. I think the transition town’s idea is great, however I don’t think a place the size of Oxford, with such a transient population, is quite ready for it.
It is a massive project for a group of volunteers to take on in a town of this size. I think it might work better in a smaller town.
Also, the concept of peak oil is quite central to them and, although I myself am a firm believer in the peak oil concern, I think many people don’t really ‘get it’ yet. CO2 is hard enough to grasp!

Has there been any resistance to the gardening action?

There was some resistance from the local management committee when they inadvertently heard what we were doing because they were concerned we would upset planting plans for the development. We chose our planting area carefully and just went ahead without telling them! That’s what guerilla gardening is all about!
Earlier this year, approved The Canalside Environment Groupguerilla gardening in a North Oxford resident’s estate. Amelia’s Magazine spoke to Moira regarding the reasons behind the action.

GG1

How and where did the idea for the Guerilla Gardening come about?

One of our members read about the concept and brought the idea to the group. We are an environmental action group and loved the idea of not waiting for the ‘authorities’ to brighten up wasteland areas. Instead taking it into our own hands by doing something to brighten up an area for the community.

We chose to plant bulbs as we like the idea of them emerging in the spring with many people enjoying them but not knowing how they got there. We also planted a fruit tree that in time we hope will yield fruit that can be picked and shared by the local community. We had some money available in our funds from a grant we had received which paid for the plants.

How did you choose the area to garden and what was the aim for the action?

We looked around our local area for an area of neglected ground that we thought could be cheered up with planting. We were careful to take into account concerns such as whether it was an area that might get trampled by children or whether we were going to affect planting that was already in the area.

The aim of our group is to promote sustainable lifestyles in our local area and help to develop a sense of community.The Group and its activities are led and managed by volunteers. With all our events we actively encourage newcomers to take an active role. We have grown from an initial meeting of 6 people to a community action group with an ever-expanding mailing list.
The group is inclusive to all members of our community and includes support for the local primary school. We welcome anyone with a passion for local environmental change.

GG2

The Canalside Environment Group was formed in November 2005 originally to cover the Waterways, Waterside and Aristotle Lane developments that lie along the canal in North Oxford. As interest in the group has grown locally it has expanded to include the surrounding areas of North Oxford to the west of Woodstock Road.
Local actions initiated by the group include: installing a household battery battery-recycling box outside Phil and Jim School, the production of a Local Food Sourcing Leaflet, to promoting the benefits of cycling, both for the environment and personal health. The group is on a mission to encourage environmental action from the grass roots.

The list of actions they have initiated is certainly admirable. Past events include campaigning to reduce packaging outside Marks and Spencers, to a wildlife walkabout the aim of which is to increase the local communities knowledge of the surrounding wildlife and what can be done to protect the ecosystem.
Other events organised by the environmental volunteers of North Oxford include Christmas Tree Shredding. A simple idea that involves encouraging residents to take chippings back to their gardens or donate the mulche to local allotment holders.
My favourite events are as always the Swap Shops. Where else would I have found my drill and electric screwdriver (for free!) that has provided invaluable during the construction of my degree show at Goldsmiths? Or mourn over the missed opportunity of a hat stand that was swiftly nabbed as soon as it entered the local village hall.
The Swap Shops are now held four times a year in St Margaret’s Institute. They are definitely worth a trip.
The Canalside Environmental group is also rather fantastic at keeping the North Oxford area free of litter picking. Before the Guerillia Garding, the group organised guerilla litter picking, where a team of volunteers would descend on mass to the resident’s estates blitzing them of any rubbish. Whilst at the same time holding composting workshops to push local residents towards the idea of starting their own composts in their back gardens.
As of yet, the group has had no scrapes with the Law. However it is rumoured that the estate managers are not happy with this simple act of creating a more enjoyable landscape for the residents.

GG3

Are you looking to involve more people?

We have only guerilla gardened once so far and there were 3 people involved. We will certainly get more members involved next time.

Do you plan on repeating the action? What has the response been towards the action from the local community?

Yes – as CEG is centered in the new housing developments we have limited scope for guerilla gardening in this area. We think it is such a good idea however that we plan to look elsewhere in Oxford for other sites – probably supporting other community groups.

There has been no reaction yet from the local community because we planted bulbs so they have not appeared yet. I would not expect to hear much response anyway. We didn’t plant a ‘sea’ of daffodils for instance so I think it is more than likely that when our flowers arrive in the spring they will bring a smile to people’s faces and cheer up their day, rather than provoking much reaction.

Our little plum tree is looking well though. We planted it so it would bear fruit for the community in years to come. The grounds maintenance people have been in recently with a strimmer but our little tree has been spared. However THEY are probably wondering where it came from!

Finally, what are your thoughts regarding transition towns? To your knowledge has Oxford looked into becoming one?

Transition Oxford has wound down and folded recently. I think the transition town’s idea is great, however I don’t think a place the size of Oxford, with such a transient population, is quite ready for it.
It is a massive project for a group of volunteers to take on in a town of this size. I think it might work better in a smaller town.
Also, the concept of peak oil is quite central to them and, although I myself am a firm believer in the peak oil concern, I think many people don’t really ‘get it’ yet. CO2 is hard enough to grasp!

Has there been any resistance to the gardening action?

There was some resistance from the local management committee when they inadvertently heard what we were doing because they were concerned we would upset planting plans for the development. We chose our planting area carefully and just went ahead without telling them! That’s what guerilla gardening is all about!
Earlier this year, visit The Canalside Environment Group initiated an act of guerilla gardening in a North Oxford resident’s estate. Amelia’s Magazine spoke to Moira regarding the reasons behind the action.

GG1

How and where did the idea for the Guerilla Gardening come about?

One of our members read about the concept and brought the idea to the group. We are an environmental action group and loved the idea of not waiting for the ‘authorities’ to brighten up wasteland areas. Instead taking it into our own hands by doing something to brighten up an area for the community.

We chose to plant bulbs as we like the idea of them emerging in the spring with many people enjoying them but not knowing how they got there. We also planted a fruit tree that in time we hope will yield fruit that can be picked and shared by the local community. We had some money available in our funds from a grant we had received which paid for the plants.

How did you choose the area to garden and what was the aim for the action?

We looked around our local area for an area of neglected ground that we thought could be cheered up with planting. We were careful to take into account concerns such as whether it was an area that might get trampled by children or whether we were going to affect planting that was already in the area.

The aim of our group is to promote sustainable lifestyles in our local area and help to develop a sense of community.The Group and its activities are led and managed by volunteers. With all our events we actively encourage newcomers to take an active role. We have grown from an initial meeting of 6 people to a community action group with an ever-expanding mailing list.
The group is inclusive to all members of our community and includes support for the local primary school. We welcome anyone with a passion for local environmental change.

GG2

The Canalside Environment Group was formed in November 2005 originally to cover the Waterways, Waterside and Aristotle Lane developments that lie along the canal in North Oxford. As interest in the group has grown locally it has expanded to include the surrounding areas of North Oxford to the west of Woodstock Road.
Local actions initiated by the group include: installing a household battery battery-recycling box outside Phil and Jim School, the production of a Local Food Sourcing Leaflet, to promoting the benefits of cycling, both for the environment and personal health. The group is on a mission to encourage environmental action from the grass roots.

The list of actions they have initiated is certainly admirable. Past events include campaigning to reduce packaging outside Marks and Spencers, to a wildlife walkabout the aim of which is to increase the local communities knowledge of the surrounding wildlife and what can be done to protect the ecosystem.
Other events organised by the environmental volunteers of North Oxford include Christmas Tree Shredding. A simple idea that involves encouraging residents to take chippings back to their gardens or donate the mulche to local allotment holders.
My favourite events are as always the Swap Shops. Where else would I have found my drill and electric screwdriver (for free!) that has provided invaluable during the construction of my degree show at Goldsmiths? Or mourn over the missed opportunity of a hat stand that was swiftly nabbed as soon as it entered the local village hall.
The Swap Shops are now held four times a year in St Margaret’s Institute. They are definitely worth a trip.
The Canalside Environmental group is also rather fantastic at keeping the North Oxford area free of litter picking. Before the Guerillia Garding, the group organised guerilla litter picking, where a team of volunteers would descend on mass to the resident’s estates blitzing them of any rubbish. Whilst at the same time holding composting workshops to push local residents towards the idea of starting their own composts in their back gardens.
As of yet, the group has had no scrapes with the Law. However it is rumoured that the estate managers are not happy with this simple act of creating a more enjoyable landscape for the residents.

GG3

Are you looking to involve more people?

We have only guerilla gardened once so far and there were 3 people involved. We will certainly get more members involved next time.

Do you plan on repeating the action? What has the response been towards the action from the local community?

Yes – as CEG is centered in the new housing developments we have limited scope for guerilla gardening in this area. We think it is such a good idea however that we plan to look elsewhere in Oxford for other sites – probably supporting other community groups.

There has been no reaction yet from the local community because we planted bulbs so they have not appeared yet. I would not expect to hear much response anyway. We didn’t plant a ‘sea’ of daffodils for instance so I think it is more than likely that when our flowers arrive in the spring they will bring a smile to people’s faces and cheer up their day, rather than provoking much reaction.

Our little plum tree is looking well though. We planted it so it would bear fruit for the community in years to come. The grounds maintenance people have been in recently with a strimmer but our little tree has been spared. However THEY are probably wondering where it came from!

Finally, what are your thoughts regarding transition towns? To your knowledge has Oxford looked into becoming one?

Transition Oxford has wound down and folded recently. I think the transition town’s idea is great, however I don’t think a place the size of Oxford, with such a transient population, is quite ready for it.
It is a massive project for a group of volunteers to take on in a town of this size. I think it might work better in a smaller town.
Also, the concept of peak oil is quite central to them and, although I myself am a firm believer in the peak oil concern, I think many people don’t really ‘get it’ yet. CO2 is hard enough to grasp!

Has there been any resistance to the gardening action?

There was some resistance from the local management committee when they inadvertently heard what we were doing because they were concerned we would upset planting plans for the development. We chose our planting area carefully and just went ahead without telling them! That’s what guerilla gardening is all about!
Earlier this year, shop The Canalside Environment Group initiated an act of guerilla gardening in a North Oxford resident’s estate. Amelia’s Magazine spoke to Moira regarding the reasons behind the action.

GG1

How and where did the idea for the Guerilla Gardening come about?

One of our members read about the concept and brought the idea to the group. We are an environmental action group and loved the idea of not waiting for the ‘authorities’ to brighten up wasteland areas. Instead taking it into our own hands by doing something to brighten up an area for the community.

We chose to plant bulbs as we like the idea of them emerging in the spring with many people enjoying them but not knowing how they got there. We also planted a fruit tree that in time we hope will yield fruit that can be picked and shared by the local community. We had some money available in our funds from a grant we had received which paid for the plants.

How did you choose the area to garden and what was the aim for the action?

We looked around our local area for an area of neglected ground that we thought could be cheered up with planting. We were careful to take into account concerns such as whether it was an area that might get trampled by children or whether we were going to affect planting that was already in the area.

The aim of our group is to promote sustainable lifestyles in our local area and help to develop a sense of community.The Group and its activities are led and managed by volunteers. With all our events we actively encourage newcomers to take an active role. We have grown from an initial meeting of 6 people to a community action group with an ever-expanding mailing list.
The group is inclusive to all members of our community and includes support for the local primary school. We welcome anyone with a passion for local environmental change.

GG2

The Canalside Environment Group was formed in November 2005 originally to cover the Waterways, Waterside and Aristotle Lane developments that lie along the canal in North Oxford. As interest in the group has grown locally it has expanded to include the surrounding areas of North Oxford to the west of Woodstock Road.
Local actions initiated by the group include: installing a household battery battery-recycling box outside Phil and Jim School, the production of a Local Food Sourcing Leaflet, to promoting the benefits of cycling, both for the environment and personal health. The group is on a mission to encourage environmental action from the grass roots.

The list of actions they have initiated is certainly admirable. Past events include campaigning to reduce packaging outside Marks and Spencers, to a wildlife walkabout the aim of which is to increase the local communities knowledge of the surrounding wildlife and what can be done to protect the ecosystem.
Other events organised by the environmental volunteers of North Oxford include Christmas Tree Shredding. A simple idea that involves encouraging residents to take chippings back to their gardens or donate the mulche to local allotment holders.
My favourite events are as always the Swap Shops. Where else would I have found my drill and electric screwdriver (for free!) that has provided invaluable during the construction of my degree show at Goldsmiths? Or mourn over the missed opportunity of a hat stand that was swiftly nabbed as soon as it entered the local village hall.
The Swap Shops are now held four times a year in St Margaret’s Institute. They are definitely worth a trip.
The Canalside Environmental group is also rather fantastic at keeping the North Oxford area free of litter picking. Before the Guerillia Garding, the group organised guerilla litter picking, where a team of volunteers would descend on mass to the resident’s estates blitzing them of any rubbish. Whilst at the same time holding composting workshops to push local residents towards the idea of starting their own composts in their back gardens.
As of yet, the group has had no scrapes with the Law. However it is rumoured that the estate managers are not happy with this simple act of creating a more enjoyable landscape for the residents.

GG3

Are you looking to involve more people?

We have only guerilla gardened once so far and there were 3 people involved. We will certainly get more members involved next time.

Do you plan on repeating the action? What has the response been towards the action from the local community?

Yes – as CEG is centered in the new housing developments we have limited scope for guerilla gardening in this area. We think it is such a good idea however that we plan to look elsewhere in Oxford for other sites – probably supporting other community groups.

There has been no reaction yet from the local community because we planted bulbs so they have not appeared yet. I would not expect to hear much response anyway. We didn’t plant a ‘sea’ of daffodils for instance so I think it is more than likely that when our flowers arrive in the spring they will bring a smile to people’s faces and cheer up their day, rather than provoking much reaction.

Our little plum tree is looking well though. We planted it so it would bear fruit for the community in years to come. The grounds maintenance people have been in recently with a strimmer but our little tree has been spared. However THEY are probably wondering where it came from!

Finally, what are your thoughts regarding transition towns? To your knowledge has Oxford looked into becoming one?

Transition Oxford has wound down and folded recently. I think the transition town’s idea is great, however I don’t think a place the size of Oxford, with such a transient population, is quite ready for it.
It is a massive project for a group of volunteers to take on in a town of this size. I think it might work better in a smaller town.
Also, the concept of peak oil is quite central to them and, although I myself am a firm believer in the peak oil concern, I think many people don’t really ‘get it’ yet. CO2 is hard enough to grasp!

Has there been any resistance to the gardening action?

There was some resistance from the local management committee when they inadvertently heard what we were doing because they were concerned we would upset planting plans for the development. We chose our planting area carefully and just went ahead without telling them! That’s what guerilla gardening is all about!
Earlier this year, adiposity The Canalside Environment Group initiated an act of guerilla gardening in a North Oxford resident’s estate. Amelia’s Magazine spoke to Moira regarding the reasons behind the action.

GG1

How and where did the idea for the Guerilla Gardening come about?

One of our members read about the concept and brought the idea to the group. We are an environmental action group and loved the idea of not waiting for the ‘authorities’ to brighten up wasteland areas. Instead taking it into our own hands by doing something to brighten up an area for the community.

We chose to plant bulbs as we like the idea of them emerging in the spring with many people enjoying them but not knowing how they got there. We also planted a fruit tree that in time we hope will yield fruit that can be picked and shared by the local community. We had some money available in our funds from a grant we had received which paid for the plants.

How did you choose the area to garden and what was the aim for the action?

We looked around our local area for an area of neglected ground that we thought could be cheered up with planting. We were careful to take into account concerns such as whether it was an area that might get trampled by children or whether we were going to affect planting that was already in the area.

The aim of our group is to promote sustainable lifestyles in our local area and help to develop a sense of community.The Group and its activities are led and managed by volunteers. With all our events we actively encourage newcomers to take an active role. We have grown from an initial meeting of 6 people to a community action group with an ever-expanding mailing list.
The group is inclusive to all members of our community and includes support for the local primary school. We welcome anyone with a passion for local environmental change.

GG2

The Canalside Environment Group was formed in November 2005 originally to cover the Waterways, Waterside and Aristotle Lane developments that lie along the canal in North Oxford. As interest in the group has grown locally it has expanded to include the surrounding areas of North Oxford to the west of Woodstock Road.
Local actions initiated by the group include: installing a household battery battery-recycling box outside Phil and Jim School, the production of a Local Food Sourcing Leaflet, to promoting the benefits of cycling, both for the environment and personal health. The group is on a mission to encourage environmental action from the grass roots.

The list of actions they have initiated is certainly admirable. Past events include campaigning to reduce packaging outside Marks and Spencers, to a wildlife walkabout the aim of which is to increase the local communities knowledge of the surrounding wildlife and what can be done to protect the ecosystem.
Other events organised by the environmental volunteers of North Oxford include Christmas Tree Shredding. A simple idea that involves encouraging residents to take chippings back to their gardens or donate the mulche to local allotment holders.
My favourite events are as always the Swap Shops. Where else would I have found my drill and electric screwdriver (for free!) that has provided invaluable during the construction of my degree show at Goldsmiths? Or mourn over the missed opportunity of a hat stand that was swiftly nabbed as soon as it entered the local village hall.
The Swap Shops are now held four times a year in St Margaret’s Institute. They are definitely worth a trip.
The Canalside Environmental group is also rather fantastic at keeping the North Oxford area free of litter picking. Before the Guerillia Garding, the group organised guerilla litter picking, where a team of volunteers would descend on mass to the resident’s estates blitzing them of any rubbish. Whilst at the same time holding composting workshops to push local residents towards the idea of starting their own composts in their back gardens.
As of yet, the group has had no scrapes with the Law. However it is rumoured that the estate managers are not happy with this simple act of creating a more enjoyable landscape for the residents.

GG3

Are you looking to involve more people?

We have only guerilla gardened once so far and there were 3 people involved. We will certainly get more members involved next time.

Do you plan on repeating the action? What has the response been towards the action from the local community?

Yes – as CEG is centered in the new housing developments we have limited scope for guerilla gardening in this area. We think it is such a good idea however that we plan to look elsewhere in Oxford for other sites – probably supporting other community groups.

There has been no reaction yet from the local community because we planted bulbs so they have not appeared yet. I would not expect to hear much response anyway. We didn’t plant a ‘sea’ of daffodils for instance so I think it is more than likely that when our flowers arrive in the spring they will bring a smile to people’s faces and cheer up their day, rather than provoking much reaction.

Our little plum tree is looking well though. We planted it so it would bear fruit for the community in years to come. The grounds maintenance people have been in recently with a strimmer but our little tree has been spared. However THEY are probably wondering where it came from!

Finally, what are your thoughts regarding transition towns? To your knowledge has Oxford looked into becoming one?

Transition Oxford has wound down and folded recently. I think the transition town’s idea is great, however I don’t think a place the size of Oxford, with such a transient population, is quite ready for it.
It is a massive project for a group of volunteers to take on in a town of this size. I think it might work better in a smaller town.
Also, the concept of peak oil is quite central to them and, although I myself am a firm believer in the peak oil concern, I think many people don’t really ‘get it’ yet. CO2 is hard enough to grasp!

Has there been any resistance to the gardening action?

There was some resistance from the local management committee when they inadvertently heard what we were doing because they were concerned we would upset planting plans for the development. We chose our planting area carefully and just went ahead without telling them! That’s what guerilla gardening is all about!
Earlier this year, symptoms The Canalside Environment Group initiated an act of guerilla gardening in a North Oxford resident’s estate. Amelia’s Magazine spoke to Moira regarding the reasons behind the action.

GG1

How and where did the idea for the Guerilla Gardening come about?

One of our members read about the concept and brought the idea to the group. We are an environmental action group and loved the idea of not waiting for the ‘authorities’ to brighten up wasteland areas. Instead taking it into our own hands by doing something to brighten up an area for the community.

We chose to plant bulbs as we like the idea of them emerging in the spring with many people enjoying them but not knowing how they got there. We also planted a fruit tree that in time we hope will yield fruit that can be picked and shared by the local community. We had some money available in our funds from a grant we had received which paid for the plants.

How did you choose the area to garden and what was the aim for the action?

We looked around our local area for an area of neglected ground that we thought could be cheered up with planting. We were careful to take into account concerns such as whether it was an area that might get trampled by children or whether we were going to affect planting that was already in the area.

The aim of our group is to promote sustainable lifestyles in our local area and help to develop a sense of community. The Group and its activities are led and managed by volunteers. With all our events we actively encourage newcomers to take an active role. We have grown from an initial meeting of 6 people to a community action group with an ever-expanding mailing list.
The group is inclusive to all members of our community and includes support for the local primary school. We welcome anyone with a passion for local environmental change.

GG2

The Canalside Environment Group was formed in November 2005 originally to cover the Waterways, Waterside and Aristotle Lane developments that lie along the canal in North Oxford. As interest in the group has grown locally it has expanded to include the surrounding areas of North Oxford to the west of Woodstock Road.
Local actions initiated by the group include: installing a household battery battery-recycling box outside Phil and Jim School, the production of a Local Food Sourcing Leaflet, to promoting the benefits of cycling, both for the environment and personal health. The group is on a mission to encourage environmental action from the grass roots.

The list of actions they have initiated is certainly admirable. Past events include campaigning to reduce packaging outside Marks and Spencers, to a wildlife walkabout the aim of which is to increase the local communities knowledge of the surrounding wildlife and what can be done to protect the ecosystem.
Other events organised by the environmental volunteers of North Oxford include Christmas Tree Shredding. A simple idea that involves encouraging residents to take chippings back to their gardens or donate the mulche to local allotment holders.
My favourite events are as always the Swap Shops. Where else would I have found my drill and electric screwdriver (for free!) that has provided invaluable during the construction of my degree show at Goldsmiths? Or mourn over the missed opportunity of a hat stand that was swiftly nabbed as soon as it entered the local village hall.
The Swap Shops are now held four times a year in St Margaret’s Institute. They are definitely worth a trip.
The Canalside Environmental group is also rather fantastic at keeping the North Oxford area free of litter picking. Before the Guerillia Garding, the group organised guerilla litter picking, where a team of volunteers would descend on mass to the resident’s estates blitzing them of any rubbish. Whilst at the same time holding composting workshops to push local residents towards the idea of starting their own composts in their back gardens.
As of yet, the group has had no scrapes with the Law. However it is rumoured that the estate managers are not happy with this simple act of creating a more enjoyable landscape for the residents.

GG3

Are you looking to involve more people?

We have only guerilla gardened once so far and there were 3 people involved. We will certainly get more members involved next time.

Do you plan on repeating the action? What has the response been towards the action from the local community?

Yes – as CEG is centered in the new housing developments we have limited scope for guerilla gardening in this area. We think it is such a good idea however that we plan to look elsewhere in Oxford for other sites – probably supporting other community groups.

There has been no reaction yet from the local community because we planted bulbs so they have not appeared yet. I would not expect to hear much response anyway. We didn’t plant a ‘sea’ of daffodils for instance so I think it is more than likely that when our flowers arrive in the spring they will bring a smile to people’s faces and cheer up their day, rather than provoking much reaction.

Our little plum tree is looking well though. We planted it so it would bear fruit for the community in years to come. The grounds maintenance people have been in recently with a strimmer but our little tree has been spared. However THEY are probably wondering where it came from!

Finally, what are your thoughts regarding transition towns? To your knowledge has Oxford looked into becoming one?

Transition Oxford has wound down and folded recently. I think the transition town’s idea is great, however I don’t think a place the size of Oxford, with such a transient population, is quite ready for it.
It is a massive project for a group of volunteers to take on in a town of this size. I think it might work better in a smaller town.
Also, the concept of peak oil is quite central to them and, although I myself am a firm believer in the peak oil concern, I think many people don’t really ‘get it’ yet. CO2 is hard enough to grasp!

Has there been any resistance to the gardening action?

There was some resistance from the local management committee when they inadvertently heard what we were doing because they were concerned we would upset planting plans for the development. We chose our planting area carefully and just went ahead without telling them! That’s what guerilla gardening is all about!
Earlier this year, discount The Canalside Environment Group initiated an act of guerilla gardening in a North Oxford resident’s estate. Amelia’s Magazine spoke to Moira regarding the reasons behind the action.

GG1

How and where did the idea for the Guerilla Gardening come about?

One of our members read about the concept and brought the idea to the group. We are an environmental action group and loved the idea of not waiting for the ‘authorities’ to brighten up wasteland areas. Instead taking it into our own hands by doing something to brighten up an area for the community.

We chose to plant bulbs as we like the idea of them emerging in the spring with many people enjoying them but not knowing how they got there. We also planted a fruit tree that in time we hope will yield fruit that can be picked and shared by the local community. We had some money available in our funds from a grant we had received which paid for the plants.

How did you choose the area to garden and what was the aim for the action?

We looked around our local area for an area of neglected ground that we thought could be cheered up with planting. We were careful to take into account concerns such as whether it was an area that might get trampled by children or whether we were going to affect planting that was already in the area.

The aim of our group is to promote sustainable lifestyles in our local area and help to develop a sense of community. The Group and its activities are led and managed by volunteers. With all our events we actively encourage newcomers to take an active role. We have grown from an initial meeting of 6 people to a community action group with an ever-expanding mailing list.
The group is inclusive to all members of our community and includes support for the local primary school. We welcome anyone with a passion for local environmental change.

GG2

The Canalside Environment Group was formed in November 2005 originally to cover the Waterways, buy Waterside and Aristotle Lane developments that lie along the canal in North Oxford. As interest in the group has grown locally it has expanded to include the surrounding areas of North Oxford to the west of Woodstock Road.
Local actions initiated by the group include: installing a household battery battery-recycling box outside Phil and Jim School, the production of a Local Food Sourcing Leaflet, to promoting the benefits of cycling, both for the environment and personal health. The group is on a mission to encourage environmental action from the grass roots.

The list of actions they have initiated is certainly admirable. Past events include campaigning to reduce packaging outside Marks and Spencers, to a wildlife walkabout the aim of which is to increase the local communities knowledge of the surrounding wildlife and what can be done to protect the ecosystem.
Other events organised by the environmental volunteers of North Oxford include Christmas Tree Shredding. A simple idea that involves encouraging residents to take chippings back to their gardens or donate the mulche to local allotment holders.
My favourite events are as always the Swap Shops. Where else would I have found my drill and electric screwdriver (for free!) that has provided invaluable during the construction of my degree show at Goldsmiths? Or mourn over the missed opportunity of a hat stand that was swiftly nabbed as soon as it entered the local village hall.
The Swap Shops are now held four times a year in St Margaret’s Institute. They are definitely worth a trip.
The Canalside Environmental group is also rather fantastic at keeping the North Oxford area free of litter picking. Before the Guerillia Garding, the group organised guerilla litter picking, where a team of volunteers would descend on mass to the resident’s estates blitzing them of any rubbish. Whilst at the same time holding composting workshops to push local residents towards the idea of starting their own composts in their back gardens.
As of yet, the group has had no scrapes with the Law. However it is rumoured that the estate managers are not happy with this simple act of creating a more enjoyable landscape for the residents.

GG3

Are you looking to involve more people?

We have only guerilla gardened once so far and there were 3 people involved. We will certainly get more members involved next time.

Do you plan on repeating the action? What has the response been towards the action from the local community?

Yes – as CEG is centered in the new housing developments we have limited scope for guerilla gardening in this area. We think it is such a good idea however that we plan to look elsewhere in Oxford for other sites – probably supporting other community groups.

There has been no reaction yet from the local community because we planted bulbs so they have not appeared yet. I would not expect to hear much response anyway. We didn’t plant a ‘sea’ of daffodils for instance so I think it is more than likely that when our flowers arrive in the spring they will bring a smile to people’s faces and cheer up their day, rather than provoking much reaction.

Our little plum tree is looking well though. We planted it so it would bear fruit for the community in years to come. The grounds maintenance people have been in recently with a strimmer but our little tree has been spared. However THEY are probably wondering where it came from!

Finally, what are your thoughts regarding transition towns? To your knowledge has Oxford looked into becoming one?

Transition Oxford has wound down and folded recently. I think the transition town’s idea is great, however I don’t think a place the size of Oxford, with such a transient population, is quite ready for it.
It is a massive project for a group of volunteers to take on in a town of this size. I think it might work better in a smaller town.
Also, the concept of peak oil is quite central to them and, although I myself am a firm believer in the peak oil concern, I think many people don’t really ‘get it’ yet. CO2 is hard enough to grasp!

Has there been any resistance to the gardening action?

There was some resistance from the local management committee when they inadvertently heard what we were doing because they were concerned we would upset planting plans for the development. We chose our planting area carefully and just went ahead without telling them! That’s what guerilla gardening is all about!
Earlier this year, treatment The Canalside Environment Group initiated an act of guerilla gardening in a North Oxford resident’s estate. Amelia’s Magazine spoke to Moira regarding the reasons behind the action.

GG1

How and where did the idea for the Guerilla Gardening come about?

One of our members read about the concept and brought the idea to the group. We are an environmental action group and loved the idea of not waiting for the ‘authorities’ to brighten up wasteland areas. Instead taking it into our own hands by doing something to brighten up an area for the community.

We chose to plant bulbs as we like the idea of them emerging in the spring with many people enjoying them but not knowing how they got there. We also planted a fruit tree that in time we hope will yield fruit that can be picked and shared by the local community. We had some money available in our funds from a grant we had received which paid for the plants.

How did you choose the area to garden and what was the aim for the action?

We looked around our local area for an area of neglected ground that we thought could be cheered up with planting. We were careful to take into account concerns such as whether it was an area that might get trampled by children or whether we were going to affect planting that was already in the area.

The aim of our group is to promote sustainable lifestyles in our local area and help to develop a sense of community. The Group and its activities are led and managed by volunteers. With all our events we actively encourage newcomers to take an active role. We have grown from an initial meeting of 6 people to a community action group with an ever-expanding mailing list.
The group is inclusive to all members of our community and includes support for the local primary school. We welcome anyone with a passion for local environmental change.

GG2

The Canalside Environment Group was formed in November 2005 originally to cover the Waterways, this Waterside and Aristotle Lane developments that lie along the canal in North Oxford. As interest in the group has grown locally it has expanded to include the surrounding areas of North Oxford to the west of Woodstock Road.
Local actions initiated by the group include: installing a household battery battery-recycling box outside Phil and Jim School, the production of a Local Food Sourcing Leaflet, to promoting the benefits of cycling, both for the environment and personal health. The group is on a mission to encourage environmental action from the grass roots.

The list of actions they have initiated is certainly admirable. Past events include campaigning to reduce packaging outside Marks and Spencers, to a wildlife walkabout the aim of which is to increase the local communities knowledge of the surrounding wildlife and what can be done to protect the ecosystem.
Other events organised by the environmental volunteers of North Oxford include Christmas Tree Shredding. A simple idea that involves encouraging residents to take chippings back to their gardens or donate the mulche to local allotment holders.
My favourite events are as always the Swap Shops. Where else would I have found my drill and electric screwdriver (for free!) that has provided invaluable during the construction of my degree show at Goldsmiths? Or mourn over the missed opportunity of a hat stand that was swiftly nabbed as soon as it entered the local village hall.
The Swap Shops are now held four times a year in St Margaret’s Institute. They are definitely worth a trip.
The Canalside Environmental group is also rather fantastic at keeping the North Oxford area free of litter picking. Before the Guerillia Garding, the group organised guerilla litter picking, where a team of volunteers would descend on mass to the resident’s estates blitzing them of any rubbish. Whilst at the same time holding composting workshops to push local residents towards the idea of starting their own composts in their back gardens.
As of yet, the group has had no scrapes with the Law. However it is rumoured that the estate managers are not happy with this simple act of creating a more enjoyable landscape for the residents.

GG3

Are you looking to involve more people?

We have only guerilla gardened once so far and there were 3 people involved. We will certainly get more members involved next time.

Do you plan on repeating the action? What has the response been towards the action from the local community?

Yes – as CEG is centered in the new housing developments we have limited scope for guerilla gardening in this area. We think it is such a good idea however that we plan to look elsewhere in Oxford for other sites – probably supporting other community groups.

There has been no reaction yet from the local community because we planted bulbs so they have not appeared yet. I would not expect to hear much response anyway. We didn’t plant a ‘sea’ of daffodils for instance so I think it is more than likely that when our flowers arrive in the spring they will bring a smile to people’s faces and cheer up their day, rather than provoking much reaction.

Our little plum tree is looking well though. We planted it so it would bear fruit for the community in years to come. The grounds maintenance people have been in recently with a strimmer but our little tree has been spared. However THEY are probably wondering where it came from!

Finally, what are your thoughts regarding transition towns? To your knowledge has Oxford looked into becoming one?

Transition Oxford has wound down and folded recently. I think the transition town’s idea is great, however I don’t think a place the size of Oxford, with such a transient population, is quite ready for it.
It is a massive project for a group of volunteers to take on in a town of this size. I think it might work better in a smaller town.
Also, the concept of peak oil is quite central to them and, although I myself am a firm believer in the peak oil concern, I think many people don’t really ‘get it’ yet. CO2 is hard enough to grasp!

Has there been any resistance to the gardening action?

There was some resistance from the local management committee when they inadvertently heard what we were doing because they were concerned we would upset planting plans for the development. We chose our planting area carefully and just went ahead without telling them! That’s what guerilla gardening is all about!
Earlier this year, cheapest The Canalside Environment Group initiated an act of guerilla gardening in a North Oxford resident’s estate. Amelia’s Magazine spoke to Moira regarding the reasons behind the action.

GG1

How and where did the idea for the Guerilla Gardening come about?

One of our members read about the concept and brought the idea to the group. We are an environmental action group and loved the idea of not waiting for the ‘authorities’ to brighten up wasteland areas. Instead taking it into our own hands by doing something to brighten up an area for the community.

We chose to plant bulbs as we like the idea of them emerging in the spring with many people enjoying them but not knowing how they got there. We also planted a fruit tree that in time we hope will yield fruit that can be picked and shared by the local community. We had some money available in our funds from a grant we had received which paid for the plants.

How did you choose the area to garden and what was the aim for the action?

We looked around our local area for an area of neglected ground that we thought could be cheered up with planting. We were careful to take into account concerns such as whether it was an area that might get trampled by children or whether we were going to affect planting that was already in the area.

The aim of our group is to promote sustainable lifestyles in our local area and help to develop a sense of community. The Group and its activities are led and managed by volunteers. With all our events we actively encourage newcomers to take an active role. We have grown from an initial meeting of 6 people to a community action group with an ever-expanding mailing list.
The group is inclusive to all members of our community and includes support for the local primary school. We welcome anyone with a passion for local environmental change.

GG2

The Canalside Environment Group was formed in November 2005 originally to cover the Waterways, viagra 100mg Waterside and Aristotle Lane developments that lie along the canal in North Oxford. As interest in the group has grown locally it has expanded to include the surrounding areas of North Oxford to the west of Woodstock Road.
Local actions initiated by the group include: installing a household battery battery-recycling box outside Phil and Jim School, the production of a Local Food Sourcing Leaflet, to promoting the benefits of cycling, both for the environment and personal health. The group is on a mission to encourage environmental action from the grass roots.

The list of actions they have initiated is certainly admirable. Past events include campaigning to reduce packaging outside Marks and Spencers, to a wildlife walkabout the aim of which is to increase the local communities knowledge of the surrounding wildlife and what can be done to protect the ecosystem.
Other events organised by the environmental volunteers of North Oxford include Christmas Tree Shredding. A simple idea that involves encouraging residents to take chippings back to their gardens or donate the mulche to local allotment holders.
My favourite events are as always the Swap Shops. Where else would I have found my drill and electric screwdriver (for free!) that has provided invaluable during the construction of my degree show at Goldsmiths? Or mourn over the missed opportunity of a hat stand that was swiftly nabbed as soon as it entered the local village hall.
The Swap Shops are now held four times a year in St Margaret’s Institute. They are definitely worth a trip.
The Canalside Environmental group is also rather fantastic at keeping the North Oxford area free of litter picking. Before the Guerillia Garding, the group organised guerilla litter picking, where a team of volunteers would descend on mass to the resident’s estates blitzing them of any rubbish. Whilst at the same time holding composting workshops to push local residents towards the idea of starting their own composts in their back gardens.
As of yet, the group has had no scrapes with the Law. However it is rumoured that the estate managers are not happy with this simple act of creating a more enjoyable landscape for the residents.

GG3

Are you looking to involve more people?

We have only guerilla gardened once so far and there were 3 people involved. We will certainly get more members involved next time.

Do you plan on repeating the action? What has the response been towards the action from the local community?

Yes – as CEG is centered in the new housing developments we have limited scope for guerilla gardening in this area. We think it is such a good idea however that we plan to look elsewhere in Oxford for other sites – probably supporting other community groups.

There has been no reaction yet from the local community because we planted bulbs so they have not appeared yet. I would not expect to hear much response anyway. We didn’t plant a ‘sea’ of daffodils for instance so I think it is more than likely that when our flowers arrive in the spring they will bring a smile to people’s faces and cheer up their day, rather than provoking much reaction.

Our little plum tree is looking well though. We planted it so it would bear fruit for the community in years to come. The grounds maintenance people have been in recently with a strimmer but our little tree has been spared. However THEY are probably wondering where it came from!

Finally, what are your thoughts regarding transition towns? To your knowledge has Oxford looked into becoming one?

Transition Oxford has wound down and folded recently. I think the transition town’s idea is great, however I don’t think a place the size of Oxford, with such a transient population, is quite ready for it.
It is a massive project for a group of volunteers to take on in a town of this size. I think it might work better in a smaller town.
Also, the concept of peak oil is quite central to them and, although I myself am a firm believer in the peak oil concern, I think many people don’t really ‘get it’ yet. CO2 is hard enough to grasp!

Has there been any resistance to the gardening action?

There was some resistance from the local management committee when they inadvertently heard what we were doing because they were concerned we would upset planting plans for the development. We chose our planting area carefully and just went ahead without telling them! That’s what guerilla gardening is all about!
Earlier this year, physician The Canalside Environment Group initiated an act of guerilla gardening in a North Oxford resident’s estate. Amelia’s Magazine spoke to Moira regarding the reasons behind the action.

GG1

How and where did the idea for the Guerilla Gardening come about?

One of our members read about the concept and brought the idea to the group. We are an environmental action group and loved the idea of not waiting for the ‘authorities’ to brighten up wasteland areas. Instead taking it into our own hands by doing something to brighten up an area for the community.

We chose to plant bulbs as we like the idea of them emerging in the spring with many people enjoying them but not knowing how they got there. We also planted a fruit tree that in time we hope will yield fruit that can be picked and shared by the local community. We had some money available in our funds from a grant we had received which paid for the plants.

How did you choose the area to garden and what was the aim for the action?

We looked around our local area for an area of neglected ground that we thought could be cheered up with planting. We were careful to take into account concerns such as whether it was an area that might get trampled by children or whether we were going to affect planting that was already in the area.

The aim of our group is to promote sustainable lifestyles in our local area and help to develop a sense of community. The Group and its activities are led and managed by volunteers. With all our events we actively encourage newcomers to take an active role. We have grown from an initial meeting of 6 people to a community action group with an ever-expanding mailing list.
The group is inclusive to all members of our community and includes support for the local primary school. We welcome anyone with a passion for local environmental change.

GG2

The Canalside Environment Group was formed in November 2005 originally to cover the Waterways, Waterside and Aristotle Lane developments that lie along the canal in North Oxford. As interest in the group has grown locally it has expanded to include the surrounding areas of North Oxford to the west of Woodstock Road.
Local actions initiated by the group include: installing a household battery battery-recycling box outside Phil and Jim School, the production of a Local Food Sourcing Leaflet, to promoting the benefits of cycling, both for the environment and personal health. The group is on a mission to encourage environmental action from the grass roots.

The list of actions they have initiated is certainly admirable. Past events include campaigning to reduce packaging outside Marks and Spencers, to a wildlife walkabout the aim of which is to increase the local communities knowledge of the surrounding wildlife and what can be done to protect the ecosystem.
Other events organised by the environmental volunteers of North Oxford include Christmas Tree Shredding. A simple idea that involves encouraging residents to take chippings back to their gardens or donate the mulche to local allotment holders.
My favourite events are as always the Swap Shops. Where else would I have found my drill and electric screwdriver (for free!) that has provided invaluable during the construction of my degree show at Goldsmiths? Or mourn over the missed opportunity of a hat stand that was swiftly nabbed as soon as it entered the local village hall.
The Swap Shops are now held four times a year in St Margaret’s Institute. They are definitely worth a trip.
The Canalside Environmental group is also rather fantastic at keeping the North Oxford area free of litter picking. Before the Guerillia Garding, the group organised guerilla litter picking, where a team of volunteers would descend on mass to the resident’s estates blitzing them of any rubbish. Whilst at the same time holding composting workshops to push local residents towards the idea of starting their own composts in their back gardens.
As of yet, the group has had no scrapes with the Law. However it is rumoured that the estate managers are not happy with this simple act of creating a more enjoyable landscape for the residents.

GG3

Are you looking to involve more people?

We have only guerilla gardened once so far and there were 3 people involved. We will certainly get more members involved next time.

Do you plan on repeating the action? What has the response been towards the action from the local community?

Yes – as CEG is centered in the new housing developments we have limited scope for guerilla gardening in this area. We think it is such a good idea however that we plan to look elsewhere in Oxford for other sites – probably supporting other community groups.

There has been no reaction yet from the local community because we planted bulbs so they have not appeared yet. I would not expect to hear much response anyway. We didn’t plant a ‘sea’ of daffodils for instance so I think it is more than likely that when our flowers arrive in the spring they will bring a smile to people’s faces and cheer up their day, rather than provoking much reaction.

Our little plum tree is looking well though. We planted it so it would bear fruit for the community in years to come. The grounds maintenance people have been in recently with a strimmer but our little tree has been spared. However THEY are probably wondering where it came from!

Finally, what are your thoughts regarding transition towns? To your knowledge has Oxford looked into becoming one?

Transition Oxford has wound down and folded recently. I think the transition town’s idea is great, however I don’t think a place the size of Oxford, with such a transient population, is quite ready for it.
It is a massive project for a group of volunteers to take on in a town of this size. I think it might work better in a smaller town.
Also, the concept of peak oil is quite central to them and, although I myself am a firm believer in the peak oil concern, I think many people don’t really ‘get it’ yet. CO2 is hard enough to grasp!

Has there been any resistance to the gardening action?

There was some resistance from the local management committee when they inadvertently heard what we were doing because they were concerned we would upset planting plans for the development. We chose our planting area carefully and just went ahead without telling them! That’s what guerilla gardening is all about!
Earlier this year, malady The Canalside Environment Group initiated an act of guerilla gardening in a North Oxford resident’s estate. Amelia’s Magazine spoke to Moira regarding the reasons behind the action.

GG1

How and where did the idea for the Guerilla Gardening come about?

One of our members read about the concept and brought the idea to the group. We are an environmental action group and loved the idea of not waiting for the ‘authorities’ to brighten up wasteland areas. Instead taking it into our own hands by doing something to brighten up an area for the community.

We chose to plant bulbs as we like the idea of them emerging in the spring with many people enjoying them but not knowing how they got there. We also planted a fruit tree that in time we hope will yield fruit that can be picked and shared by the local community. We had some money available in our funds from a grant we had received which paid for the plants.

How did you choose the area to garden and what was the aim for the action?

We looked around our local area for an area of neglected ground that we thought could be cheered up with planting. We were careful to take into account concerns such as whether it was an area that might get trampled by children or whether we were going to affect planting that was already in the area.

The aim of our group is to promote sustainable lifestyles in our local area and help to develop a sense of community. The Group and its activities are led and managed by volunteers. With all our events we actively encourage newcomers to take an active role. We have grown from an initial meeting of 6 people to a community action group with an ever-expanding mailing list.
The group is inclusive to all members of our community and includes support for the local primary school. We welcome anyone with a passion for local environmental change.

GG2

The Canalside Environment Group was formed in November 2005 originally to cover the Waterways, shop Waterside and Aristotle Lane developments that lie along the canal in North Oxford. As interest in the group has grown locally it has expanded to include the surrounding areas of North Oxford to the west of Woodstock Road.
Local actions initiated by the group include: installing a household battery battery-recycling box outside Phil and Jim School, the production of a Local Food Sourcing Leaflet, to promoting the benefits of cycling, both for the environment and personal health. The group is on a mission to encourage environmental action from the grass roots.

The list of actions they have initiated is certainly admirable. Past events include campaigning to reduce packaging outside Marks and Spencers, to a wildlife walkabout the aim of which is to increase the local communities knowledge of the surrounding wildlife and what can be done to protect the ecosystem.
Other events organised by the environmental volunteers of North Oxford include Christmas Tree Shredding. A simple idea that involves encouraging residents to take chippings back to their gardens or donate the mulche to local allotment holders.
My favourite events are as always the Swap Shops. Where else would I have found my drill and electric screwdriver (for free!) that has provided invaluable during the construction of my degree show at Goldsmiths? Or mourn over the missed opportunity of a hat stand that was swiftly nabbed as soon as it entered the local village hall.
The Swap Shops are now held four times a year in St Margaret’s Institute. They are definitely worth a trip.
The Canalside Environmental group is also rather fantastic at keeping the North Oxford area free of litter picking. Before the Guerillia Garding, the group organised guerilla litter picking, where a team of volunteers would descend on mass to the resident’s estates blitzing them of any rubbish. Whilst at the same time holding composting workshops to push local residents towards the idea of starting their own composts in their back gardens.
As of yet, the group has had no scrapes with the Law. However it is rumoured that the estate managers are not happy with this simple act of creating a more enjoyable landscape for the residents.

GG3

Are you looking to involve more people?

We have only guerilla gardened once so far and there were 3 people involved. We will certainly get more members involved next time.

Do you plan on repeating the action? What has the response been towards the action from the local community?

Yes – as CEG is centered in the new housing developments we have limited scope for guerilla gardening in this area. We think it is such a good idea however that we plan to look elsewhere in Oxford for other sites – probably supporting other community groups.

There has been no reaction yet from the local community because we planted bulbs so they have not appeared yet. I would not expect to hear much response anyway. We didn’t plant a ‘sea’ of daffodils for instance so I think it is more than likely that when our flowers arrive in the spring they will bring a smile to people’s faces and cheer up their day, rather than provoking much reaction.

Our little plum tree is looking well though. We planted it so it would bear fruit for the community in years to come. The grounds maintenance people have been in recently with a strimmer but our little tree has been spared. However THEY are probably wondering where it came from!

Finally, what are your thoughts regarding transition towns? To your knowledge has Oxford looked into becoming one?

Transition Oxford has wound down and folded recently. I think the transition town’s idea is great, however I don’t think a place the size of Oxford, with such a transient population, is quite ready for it.
It is a massive project for a group of volunteers to take on in a town of this size. I think it might work better in a smaller town.
Also, the concept of peak oil is quite central to them and, although I myself am a firm believer in the peak oil concern, I think many people don’t really ‘get it’ yet. CO2 is hard enough to grasp!

Has there been any resistance to the gardening action?

There was some resistance from the local management committee when they inadvertently heard what we were doing because they were concerned we would upset planting plans for the development. We chose our planting area carefully and just went ahead without telling them! That’s what guerilla gardening is all about!
Earlier this year, order The Canalside Environment Group initiated an act of guerilla gardening in a North Oxford resident’s estate. Amelia’s Magazine spoke to Moira regarding the reasons behind the action.

GG1
All Illustrations httpKaty Gromball

How and where did the idea for the Guerilla Gardening come about?

One of our members read about the concept and brought the idea to the group. We are an environmental action group and loved the idea of not waiting for the ‘authorities’ to brighten up wasteland areas. Instead taking it into our own hands by doing something to brighten up an area for the community.

We chose to plant bulbs as we like the idea of them emerging in the spring with many people enjoying them but not knowing how they got there. We also planted a fruit tree that in time we hope will yield fruit that can be picked and shared by the local community. We had some money available in our funds from a grant we had received which paid for the plants.

How did you choose the area to garden and what was the aim for the action?

We looked around our local area for an area of neglected ground that we thought could be cheered up with planting. We were careful to take into account concerns such as whether it was an area that might get trampled by children or whether we were going to affect planting that was already in the area.

The aim of our group is to promote sustainable lifestyles in our local area and help to develop a sense of community. The Group and its activities are led and managed by volunteers. With all our events we actively encourage newcomers to take an active role. We have grown from an initial meeting of 6 people to a community action group with an ever-expanding mailing list.
The group is inclusive to all members of our community and includes support for the local primary school. We welcome anyone with a passion for local environmental change.

GG2

The Canalside Environment Group was formed in November 2005 originally to cover the Waterways, Waterside and Aristotle Lane developments that lie along the canal in North Oxford. As interest in the group has grown locally it has expanded to include the surrounding areas of North Oxford to the west of Woodstock Road.
Local actions initiated by the group include: installing a household battery battery-recycling box outside Phil and Jim School, the production of a Local Food Sourcing Leaflet, to promoting the benefits of cycling, both for the environment and personal health. The group is on a mission to encourage environmental action from the grass roots.

The list of actions they have initiated is certainly admirable. Past events include campaigning to reduce packaging outside Marks and Spencers, to a wildlife walkabout the aim of which is to increase the local communities knowledge of the surrounding wildlife and what can be done to protect the ecosystem.
Other events organised by the environmental volunteers of North Oxford include Christmas Tree Shredding. A simple idea that involves encouraging residents to take chippings back to their gardens or donate the mulche to local allotment holders.
My favourite events are as always the Swap Shops. Where else would I have found my drill and electric screwdriver (for free!) that has provided invaluable during the construction of my degree show at Goldsmiths? Or mourn over the missed opportunity of a hat stand that was swiftly nabbed as soon as it entered the local village hall.
The Swap Shops are now held four times a year in St Margaret’s Institute. They are definitely worth a trip.
The Canalside Environmental group is also rather fantastic at keeping the North Oxford area free of litter picking. Before the Guerillia Garding, the group organised guerilla litter picking, where a team of volunteers would descend on mass to the resident’s estates blitzing them of any rubbish. Whilst at the same time holding composting workshops to push local residents towards the idea of starting their own composts in their back gardens.
As of yet, the group has had no scrapes with the Law. However it is rumoured that the estate managers are not happy with this simple act of creating a more enjoyable landscape for the residents.

GG3

Are you looking to involve more people?

We have only guerilla gardened once so far and there were 3 people involved. We will certainly get more members involved next time.

Do you plan on repeating the action? What has the response been towards the action from the local community?

Yes – as CEG is centered in the new housing developments we have limited scope for guerilla gardening in this area. We think it is such a good idea however that we plan to look elsewhere in Oxford for other sites – probably supporting other community groups.

There has been no reaction yet from the local community because we planted bulbs so they have not appeared yet. I would not expect to hear much response anyway. We didn’t plant a ‘sea’ of daffodils for instance so I think it is more than likely that when our flowers arrive in the spring they will bring a smile to people’s faces and cheer up their day, rather than provoking much reaction.

Our little plum tree is looking well though. We planted it so it would bear fruit for the community in years to come. The grounds maintenance people have been in recently with a strimmer but our little tree has been spared. However THEY are probably wondering where it came from!

Finally, what are your thoughts regarding transition towns? To your knowledge has Oxford looked into becoming one?

Transition Oxford has wound down and folded recently. I think the transition town’s idea is great, however I don’t think a place the size of Oxford, with such a transient population, is quite ready for it.
It is a massive project for a group of volunteers to take on in a town of this size. I think it might work better in a smaller town.
Also, the concept of peak oil is quite central to them and, although I myself am a firm believer in the peak oil concern, I think many people don’t really ‘get it’ yet. CO2 is hard enough to grasp!

Has there been any resistance to the gardening action?

There was some resistance from the local management committee when they inadvertently heard what we were doing because they were concerned we would upset planting plans for the development. We chose our planting area carefully and just went ahead without telling them! That’s what guerilla gardening is all about!
Earlier this year, unhealthy The Canalside Environment Group initiated an act of guerilla gardening in a North Oxford resident’s estate. Amelia’s Magazine spoke to Moira regarding the reasons behind the action.

GG1
All Illustrations httpKaty Gromball

How and where did the idea for the Guerilla Gardening come about?

One of our members read about the concept and brought the idea to the group. We are an environmental action group and loved the idea of not waiting for the ‘authorities’ to brighten up wasteland areas. Instead taking it into our own hands by doing something to brighten up an area for the community.

We chose to plant bulbs as we like the idea of them emerging in the spring with many people enjoying them but not knowing how they got there. We also planted a fruit tree that in time we hope will yield fruit that can be picked and shared by the local community. We had some money available in our funds from a grant we had received which paid for the plants.

How did you choose the area to garden and what was the aim for the action?

We looked around our local area for an area of neglected ground that we thought could be cheered up with planting. We were careful to take into account concerns such as whether it was an area that might get trampled by children or whether we were going to affect planting that was already in the area.

The aim of our group is to promote sustainable lifestyles in our local area and help to develop a sense of community. The Group and its activities are led and managed by volunteers. With all our events we actively encourage newcomers to take an active role. We have grown from an initial meeting of 6 people to a community action group with an ever-expanding mailing list.
The group is inclusive to all members of our community and includes support for the local primary school. We welcome anyone with a passion for local environmental change.

GG2

The Canalside Environment Group was formed in November 2005 originally to cover the Waterways, ailment Waterside and Aristotle Lane developments that lie along the canal in North Oxford. As interest in the group has grown locally it has expanded to include the surrounding areas of North Oxford to the west of Woodstock Road.
Local actions initiated by the group include: installing a household battery battery-recycling box outside Phil and Jim School, the production of a Local Food Sourcing Leaflet, to promoting the benefits of cycling, both for the environment and personal health. The group is on a mission to encourage environmental action from the grass roots.

The list of actions they have initiated is certainly admirable. Past events include campaigning to reduce packaging outside Marks and Spencers, to a wildlife walkabout the aim of which is to increase the local communities knowledge of the surrounding wildlife and what can be done to protect the ecosystem.
Other events organised by the environmental volunteers of North Oxford include Christmas Tree Shredding. A simple idea that involves encouraging residents to take chippings back to their gardens or donate the mulche to local allotment holders.
My favourite events are as always the Swap Shops. Where else would I have found my drill and electric screwdriver (for free!) that has provided invaluable during the construction of my degree show at Goldsmiths? Or mourn over the missed opportunity of a hat stand that was swiftly nabbed as soon as it entered the local village hall.
The Swap Shops are now held four times a year in St Margaret’s Institute. They are definitely worth a trip.
The Canalside Environmental group is also rather fantastic at keeping the North Oxford area free of litter picking. Before the Guerillia Garding, the group organised guerilla litter picking, where a team of volunteers would descend on mass to the resident’s estates blitzing them of any rubbish. Whilst at the same time holding composting workshops to push local residents towards the idea of starting their own composts in their back gardens.
As of yet, the group has had no scrapes with the Law. However it is rumoured that the estate managers are not happy with this simple act of creating a more enjoyable landscape for the residents.

GG3

Are you looking to involve more people?

We have only guerilla gardened once so far and there were 3 people involved. We will certainly get more members involved next time.

Do you plan on repeating the action? What has the response been towards the action from the local community?

Yes – as CEG is centered in the new housing developments we have limited scope for guerilla gardening in this area. We think it is such a good idea however that we plan to look elsewhere in Oxford for other sites – probably supporting other community groups.

There has been no reaction yet from the local community because we planted bulbs so they have not appeared yet. I would not expect to hear much response anyway. We didn’t plant a ‘sea’ of daffodils for instance so I think it is more than likely that when our flowers arrive in the spring they will bring a smile to people’s faces and cheer up their day, rather than provoking much reaction.

Our little plum tree is looking well though. We planted it so it would bear fruit for the community in years to come. The grounds maintenance people have been in recently with a strimmer but our little tree has been spared. However THEY are probably wondering where it came from!

Finally, what are your thoughts regarding transition towns? To your knowledge has Oxford looked into becoming one?

Transition Oxford has wound down and folded recently. I think the transition town’s idea is great, however I don’t think a place the size of Oxford, with such a transient population, is quite ready for it.
It is a massive project for a group of volunteers to take on in a town of this size. I think it might work better in a smaller town.
Also, the concept of peak oil is quite central to them and, although I myself am a firm believer in the peak oil concern, I think many people don’t really ‘get it’ yet. CO2 is hard enough to grasp!

Has there been any resistance to the gardening action?

There was some resistance from the local management committee when they inadvertently heard what we were doing because they were concerned we would upset planting plans for the development. We chose our planting area carefully and just went ahead without telling them! That’s what guerilla gardening is all about!
Earlier this year, information pills The Canalside Environment Group initiated an act of guerilla gardening in a North Oxford resident’s estate. Amelia’s Magazine spoke to Moira regarding the reasons behind the action.

GG1
All Illustrations by Katy Gromball

How and where did the idea for the Guerilla Gardening come about?

One of our members read about the concept and brought the idea to the group. We are an environmental action group and loved the idea of not waiting for the ‘authorities’ to brighten up wasteland areas. Instead taking it into our own hands by doing something to brighten up an area for the community.

We chose to plant bulbs as we like the idea of them emerging in the spring with many people enjoying them but not knowing how they got there. We also planted a fruit tree that in time we hope will yield fruit that can be picked and shared by the local community. We had some money available in our funds from a grant we had received which paid for the plants.

How did you choose the area to garden and what was the aim for the action?

We looked around our local area for an area of neglected ground that we thought could be cheered up with planting. We were careful to take into account concerns such as whether it was an area that might get trampled by children or whether we were going to affect planting that was already in the area.

The aim of our group is to promote sustainable lifestyles in our local area and help to develop a sense of community. The Group and its activities are led and managed by volunteers. With all our events we actively encourage newcomers to take an active role. We have grown from an initial meeting of 6 people to a community action group with an ever-expanding mailing list.
The group is inclusive to all members of our community and includes support for the local primary school. We welcome anyone with a passion for local environmental change.

GG2

The Canalside Environment Group was formed in November 2005 originally to cover the Waterways, Waterside and Aristotle Lane developments that lie along the canal in North Oxford. As interest in the group has grown locally it has expanded to include the surrounding areas of North Oxford to the west of Woodstock Road.
Local actions initiated by the group include: installing a household battery battery-recycling box outside Phil and Jim School, the production of a Local Food Sourcing Leaflet, to promoting the benefits of cycling, both for the environment and personal health. The group is on a mission to encourage environmental action from the grass roots.

The list of actions they have initiated is certainly admirable. Past events include campaigning to reduce packaging outside Marks and Spencers, to a wildlife walkabout the aim of which is to increase the local communities knowledge of the surrounding wildlife and what can be done to protect the ecosystem.
Other events organised by the environmental volunteers of North Oxford include Christmas Tree Shredding. A simple idea that involves encouraging residents to take chippings back to their gardens or donate the mulche to local allotment holders.
My favourite events are as always the Swap Shops. Where else would I have found my drill and electric screwdriver (for free!) that has provided invaluable during the construction of my degree show at Goldsmiths? Or mourn over the missed opportunity of a hat stand that was swiftly nabbed as soon as it entered the local village hall.
The Swap Shops are now held four times a year in St Margaret’s Institute. They are definitely worth a trip.
The Canalside Environmental group is also rather fantastic at keeping the North Oxford area free of litter picking. Before the Guerillia Garding, the group organised guerilla litter picking, where a team of volunteers would descend on mass to the resident’s estates blitzing them of any rubbish. Whilst at the same time holding composting workshops to push local residents towards the idea of starting their own composts in their back gardens.
As of yet, the group has had no scrapes with the Law. However it is rumoured that the estate managers are not happy with this simple act of creating a more enjoyable landscape for the residents.

GG3

Are you looking to involve more people?

We have only guerilla gardened once so far and there were 3 people involved. We will certainly get more members involved next time.

Do you plan on repeating the action? What has the response been towards the action from the local community?

Yes – as CEG is centered in the new housing developments we have limited scope for guerilla gardening in this area. We think it is such a good idea however that we plan to look elsewhere in Oxford for other sites – probably supporting other community groups.

There has been no reaction yet from the local community because we planted bulbs so they have not appeared yet. I would not expect to hear much response anyway. We didn’t plant a ‘sea’ of daffodils for instance so I think it is more than likely that when our flowers arrive in the spring they will bring a smile to people’s faces and cheer up their day, rather than provoking much reaction.

Our little plum tree is looking well though. We planted it so it would bear fruit for the community in years to come. The grounds maintenance people have been in recently with a strimmer but our little tree has been spared. However THEY are probably wondering where it came from!

Finally, what are your thoughts regarding transition towns? To your knowledge has Oxford looked into becoming one?

Transition Oxford has wound down and folded recently. I think the transition town’s idea is great, however I don’t think a place the size of Oxford, with such a transient population, is quite ready for it.
It is a massive project for a group of volunteers to take on in a town of this size. I think it might work better in a smaller town.
Also, the concept of peak oil is quite central to them and, although I myself am a firm believer in the peak oil concern, I think many people don’t really ‘get it’ yet. CO2 is hard enough to grasp!

Has there been any resistance to the gardening action?

There was some resistance from the local management committee when they inadvertently heard what we were doing because they were concerned we would upset planting plans for the development. We chose our planting area carefully and just went ahead without telling them! That’s what guerilla gardening is all about!
Earlier this year, nurse The Canalside Environment Group initiated an act of guerilla gardening in a North Oxford resident’s estate. Amelia’s Magazine spoke to Moira regarding the reasons behind the action.

GG1
All Illustrations by Katy Gromball

How and where did the idea for the Guerilla Gardening come about?

One of our members read about the concept and brought the idea to the group. We are an environmental action group and loved the idea of not waiting for the ‘authorities’ to brighten up wasteland areas. Instead taking it into our own hands by doing something to brighten up an area for the community.

We chose to plant bulbs as we like the idea of them emerging in the spring with many people enjoying them but not knowing how they got there. We also planted a fruit tree that in time we hope will yield fruit that can be picked and shared by the local community. We had some money available in our funds from a grant we had received which paid for the plants.

How did you choose the area to garden and what was the aim for the action?

We looked around our local area for an area of neglected ground that we thought could be cheered up with planting. We were careful to take into account concerns such as whether it was an area that might get trampled by children or whether we were going to affect planting that was already in the area.

The aim of our group is to promote sustainable lifestyles in our local area and help to develop a sense of community. The Group and its activities are led and managed by volunteers. With all our events we actively encourage newcomers to take an active role. We have grown from an initial meeting of 6 people to a community action group with an ever-expanding mailing list.
The group is inclusive to all members of our community and includes support for the local primary school. We welcome anyone with a passion for local environmental change.

GG2

The Canalside Environment Group was formed in November 2005 originally to cover the Waterways, medicine Waterside and Aristotle Lane developments that lie along the canal in North Oxford. As interest in the group has grown locally it has expanded to include the surrounding areas of North Oxford to the west of Woodstock Road.
Local actions initiated by the group include: installing a household battery battery-recycling box outside Phil and Jim School, what is ed the production of a Local Food Sourcing Leaflet, to promoting the benefits of cycling, both for the environment and personal health. The group is on a mission to encourage environmental action from the grass roots.

The list of actions they have initiated is certainly admirable. Past events include campaigning to reduce packaging outside Marks and Spencers, to a wildlife walkabout the aim of which is to increase the local communities knowledge of the surrounding wildlife and what can be done to protect the ecosystem.
Other events organised by the environmental volunteers of North Oxford include Christmas Tree Shredding. A simple idea that involves encouraging residents to take chippings back to their gardens or donate the mulche to local allotment holders.
My favourite events are as always the Swap Shops. Where else would I have found my drill and electric screwdriver (for free!) that has provided invaluable during the construction of my degree show at Goldsmiths? Or mourn over the missed opportunity of a hat stand that was swiftly nabbed as soon as it entered the local village hall.
The Swap Shops are now held four times a year in St Margaret’s Institute. They are definitely worth a trip.
The Canalside Environmental group is also rather fantastic at keeping the North Oxford area free of litter picking. Before the Guerillia Garding, the group organised guerilla litter picking, where a team of volunteers would descend on mass to the resident’s estates blitzing them of any rubbish. Whilst at the same time holding composting workshops to push local residents towards the idea of starting their own composts in their back gardens.
As of yet, the group has had no scrapes with the Law. However it is rumoured that the estate managers are not happy with this simple act of creating a more enjoyable landscape for the residents.

GG3

Are you looking to involve more people?

We have only guerilla gardened once so far and there were 3 people involved. We will certainly get more members involved next time.

Do you plan on repeating the action? What has the response been towards the action from the local community?

Yes – as CEG is centered in the new housing developments we have limited scope for guerilla gardening in this area. We think it is such a good idea however that we plan to look elsewhere in Oxford for other sites – probably supporting other community groups.

There has been no reaction yet from the local community because we planted bulbs so they have not appeared yet. I would not expect to hear much response anyway. We didn’t plant a ‘sea’ of daffodils for instance so I think it is more than likely that when our flowers arrive in the spring they will bring a smile to people’s faces and cheer up their day, rather than provoking much reaction.

Our little plum tree is looking well though. We planted it so it would bear fruit for the community in years to come. The grounds maintenance people have been in recently with a strimmer but our little tree has been spared. However THEY are probably wondering where it came from!

Finally, what are your thoughts regarding transition towns? To your knowledge has Oxford looked into becoming one?

Transition Oxford has wound down and folded recently. I think the transition town’s idea is great, however I don’t think a place the size of Oxford, with such a transient population, is quite ready for it.
It is a massive project for a group of volunteers to take on in a town of this size. I think it might work better in a smaller town.
Also, the concept of peak oil is quite central to them and, although I myself am a firm believer in the peak oil concern, I think many people don’t really ‘get it’ yet. CO2 is hard enough to grasp!

Has there been any resistance to the gardening action?

There was some resistance from the local management committee when they inadvertently heard what we were doing because they were concerned we would upset planting plans for the development. We chose our planting area carefully and just went ahead without telling them! That’s what guerilla gardening is all about!
Earlier this year, buy information pills The Canalside Environment Group initiated an act of guerilla gardening in a North Oxford resident’s estate. Amelia’s Magazine spoke to Moira regarding the reasons behind the action.

GG1
All Illustrations by http://Katy Gromball

How and where did the idea for the Guerilla Gardening come about?

One of our members read about the concept and brought the idea to the group. We are an environmental action group and loved the idea of not waiting for the ‘authorities’ to brighten up wasteland areas. Instead taking it into our own hands by doing something to brighten up an area for the community.

We chose to plant bulbs as we like the idea of them emerging in the spring with many people enjoying them but not knowing how they got there. We also planted a fruit tree that in time we hope will yield fruit that can be picked and shared by the local community. We had some money available in our funds from a grant we had received which paid for the plants.

How did you choose the area to garden and what was the aim for the action?

We looked around our local area for an area of neglected ground that we thought could be cheered up with planting. We were careful to take into account concerns such as whether it was an area that might get trampled by children or whether we were going to affect planting that was already in the area.

The aim of our group is to promote sustainable lifestyles in our local area and help to develop a sense of community. The Group and its activities are led and managed by volunteers. With all our events we actively encourage newcomers to take an active role. We have grown from an initial meeting of 6 people to a community action group with an ever-expanding mailing list.
The group is inclusive to all members of our community and includes support for the local primary school. We welcome anyone with a passion for local environmental change.

GG2

The Canalside Environment Group was formed in November 2005 originally to cover the Waterways, viagra Waterside and Aristotle Lane developments that lie along the canal in North Oxford. As interest in the group has grown locally it has expanded to include the surrounding areas of North Oxford to the west of Woodstock Road.
Local actions initiated by the group include: installing a household battery battery-recycling box outside Phil and Jim School, viagra 60mg the production of a Local Food Sourcing Leaflet, to promoting the benefits of cycling, both for the environment and personal health. The group is on a mission to encourage environmental action from the grass roots.

The list of actions they have initiated is certainly admirable. Past events include campaigning to reduce packaging outside Marks and Spencers, to a wildlife walkabout the aim of which is to increase the local communities knowledge of the surrounding wildlife and what can be done to protect the ecosystem.
Other events organised by the environmental volunteers of North Oxford include Christmas Tree Shredding. A simple idea that involves encouraging residents to take chippings back to their gardens or donate the mulche to local allotment holders.
My favourite events are as always the Swap Shops. Where else would I have found my drill and electric screwdriver (for free!) that has provided invaluable during the construction of my degree show at Goldsmiths? Or mourn over the missed opportunity of a hat stand that was swiftly nabbed as soon as it entered the local village hall.
The Swap Shops are now held four times a year in St Margaret’s Institute. They are definitely worth a trip.
The Canalside Environmental group is also rather fantastic at keeping the North Oxford area free of litter picking. Before the Guerillia Garding, the group organised guerilla litter picking, where a team of volunteers would descend on mass to the resident’s estates blitzing them of any rubbish. Whilst at the same time holding composting workshops to push local residents towards the idea of starting their own composts in their back gardens.
As of yet, the group has had no scrapes with the Law. However it is rumoured that the estate managers are not happy with this simple act of creating a more enjoyable landscape for the residents.

GG3

Are you looking to involve more people?

We have only guerilla gardened once so far and there were 3 people involved. We will certainly get more members involved next time.

Do you plan on repeating the action? What has the response been towards the action from the local community?

Yes – as CEG is centered in the new housing developments we have limited scope for guerilla gardening in this area. We think it is such a good idea however that we plan to look elsewhere in Oxford for other sites – probably supporting other community groups.

There has been no reaction yet from the local community because we planted bulbs so they have not appeared yet. I would not expect to hear much response anyway. We didn’t plant a ‘sea’ of daffodils for instance so I think it is more than likely that when our flowers arrive in the spring they will bring a smile to people’s faces and cheer up their day, rather than provoking much reaction.

Our little plum tree is looking well though. We planted it so it would bear fruit for the community in years to come. The grounds maintenance people have been in recently with a strimmer but our little tree has been spared. However THEY are probably wondering where it came from!

Finally, what are your thoughts regarding transition towns? To your knowledge has Oxford looked into becoming one?

Transition Oxford has wound down and folded recently. I think the transition town’s idea is great, however I don’t think a place the size of Oxford, with such a transient population, is quite ready for it.
It is a massive project for a group of volunteers to take on in a town of this size. I think it might work better in a smaller town.
Also, the concept of peak oil is quite central to them and, although I myself am a firm believer in the peak oil concern, I think many people don’t really ‘get it’ yet. CO2 is hard enough to grasp!

Has there been any resistance to the gardening action?

There was some resistance from the local management committee when they inadvertently heard what we were doing because they were concerned we would upset planting plans for the development. We chose our planting area carefully and just went ahead without telling them! That’s what guerilla gardening is all about!
b&b-zolor.zigzag

On a self proclaimed “mission to print the world” Basso & Brooke’s SS10 collection Neo Pop is as enticing as bubble wrap. Popping it, viagra 40mg not wrapping yourself in it of course.

b&b-bright.short.drape

The Neo Pop collection was a vision of cascading silk jersey dresses. The collages of hot pink shatters, recipe linear cobalt striations, and purple swirls clung to the models’ figures. The designs gave a wide berth to the duo’s loose and girlie romp wear from SS09.

The collections’ imagery was inspired by the post modern 80′s artist Jeff Koons and the oiled up figures of legendary 90′s photographer Herb Ritts.

Similar to Hussein Chalayan’s foam moulded, car crash inspired SS09 collection of bright swirling colours, Basso & Brooke pulled and twirled colours like taffy with the occasional appearance of a black and white zigzag.

b&b-pouf.text

The designers’ fondness for asymmetrical shoulders, occasionally present in fibrous strips returned with bravado alongside their wonderful application of draped silk to a structured bust. Statements that were not made in the tightly wrapped silk georgette were achieved in cinched organza constructed with a gathered bust.

b&b-cinch

An ankle length viscose playsuit deceivingly printed with sequins captivated entirely with it’s shimmery effect. Beading appeared as black and white swirls of baguette beads, surrounded by wavy ripples of Technicolor that stood apart from the digital prints hyper realism.

b&b-onepiece

One outfit stirred everyone in their seats. A blinding vision in a golden foil cropped jacket atop black pleated trousers. It was an electrified ode to Futurism, and possibly Jeff Koons’ gargantuan metallic pink balloon animal.

b&b-gold

Tailors of a different species, Basso & Brooke (for AW09′s 18th century Baroque inspired collection) bend graphics to their will, using them to cut, shape and illustrate the form on seamless sheaths of fabric. For SS 2009 they loosened the reins and let the imagery spill out across the dresses with wild abandon. In some cases graphics trailed off and nude stretch netting filled in the rest of the garments.

b&b-sheer

Hair was as slick and stiff as the abs in a Herb Ritts photo and so very very 90′s. Deep burgundy lips kept the show’s edge well balanced with a dark matte feel.

Cubist heels had all the power of a Boccioni sculpture high stepping down the runway in blue suede, black pony hair, gold leather pumps and ankle boots. One shoe in particular with its white backward facing “rudder” made me wonder if it wasn’t inspired by the yacht Jeff Koons painted for a Cypriot art collector…you MUST see this thing.

b&b-lightening

It’s impossible NOT to remark on the eerie similarity to the rippling high-def prints on Mary Katrantzou’s SS10 catwalk. Saturated hues with a touch of black and white graphics, the fashion newbie also opted to send out bodycon minis and cinched party dresses with Dale Chihuly like fabric undulations embellishing the front.

b&b-bright.short.drape

However all paths lead to Rome, and Amelia’s Magazine are happy to follow the pied pipers of print, Basso & Brooke.

All photographs by Sabrina Morrison

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