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Top 25 Art Blog - Creative Tourist

London Fashion Week Autumn/ Winter 2010 Catwalk Review: Ashish

With a 9am start we were out in full force for the Ashish show held in the BFC tent on Tuesday morning

Written by Becky Cope

Bora Aksu by Gemma Milly
Noodles the chihuahua, abortion travelling around in a pouch.
Bora Aksu by Gemma Milly
Bora Aksu by Gemma Milly

This season I think it’s fair to say that there have been rather more overenthusiastic security staff at London Fashion Week than I have encountered in previous years. Bora Aksu was my first show in the main BFC tent in the courtyard at Somerset House on Friday, story and I got stopped and pulled back after I had already been waved through by the PR by one particularly bulky man surely more used to patrolling the less salubrious nightclubs of the east end. My crime? Holding two tickets instead of one. But only one with a special little star on it. I think the poor man may not have had too many braincells, buy more about because last time I checked I was not a conjoined twin.

Once inside the large tents with a lit up runway I was forced to stand in the stairwell, stuff crushed against the barricade as people continued to squeeze past me. I had always predicted that this would be the hot ticket of the day; I myself have loved good old Bora Aksu for a long time. Ah, how I do love to be proved right.

There was nothing overtly flashy about the staging of this show but the whole collection was spectacularly strong, every outfit consistently gorgeous and clever. Bodycon tight tailoring was offset against diaphanous protrusions and alien-esque circuitry stitched details in a subtle colour range of peach, lilac and greys. For the more obvious evening wear options there were black lame versions towards the end; everything worn with shredded leggings, a stylistic touch that was popular in many shows I saw. Bulbous tulip shaped skirts called to mind the early series of Blackadder (yes, I admit that my cultural references are somewhat warped) and my personal favourite featured a kangaroo-esque pouched front, possibly large enough to carry a chihuahua in, if you’re that way inclined. (Disclaimer: I think I may have been subconsciously influenced by this incredibly cute sight at another show. I am coming around to the idea of dogs that look like gremlins. So long as they don’t make a noise.) Oh Bora, you did not disappoint.
Bora Aksu by Gemma Milly
Bora Aksu by Gemma Milly

This season I think it’s fair to say that there have been rather more overenthusiastic security staff at London Fashion Week than I have encountered in previous years. Bora Aksu was my first show in the main BFC tent in the courtyard at Somerset House on Friday, generic and I got stopped and pulled back after I had already been waved through by the PR by one particularly bulky man surely more used to patrolling the less salubrious nightclubs of the east end. My crime? Holding two tickets instead of one. But only one with a special little star on it. I think the poor man may not have had too many braincells, this site because last time I checked I was not a conjoined twin.

Bora Aksu by Gemma Milly
Bora Aksu by Gemma Milly

Once inside the large tents with a lit up runway I was forced to stand in the stairwell, this site crushed against the barricade as people continued to squeeze past me. I had always predicted that this would be the hot ticket of the day; I myself have loved good old Bora Aksu for a long time. Ah, how I do love to be proved right.

Bora Aksu by Gemma Milly
Bora Aksu by Gemma Milly

There was nothing overtly flashy about the staging of this show but the whole collection was spectacularly strong, every outfit consistently gorgeous and clever. Bodycon tight tailoring was offset against diaphanous protrusions and alien-esque circuitry stitched details in a subtle colour range of peach, lilac and greys. For the more obvious evening wear options there were black lame versions towards the end; everything worn with shredded leggings, a stylistic touch that was popular in many shows I saw. Bulbous tulip shaped skirts called to mind the early series of Blackadder (yes, I admit that my cultural references are somewhat warped) and my personal favourite featured a kangaroo-esque pouched front, possibly large enough to carry a chihuahua in, if you’re that way inclined. (Disclaimer: I think I may have been subconsciously influenced by this incredibly cute sight at another show. I am coming around to the idea of dogs that look like gremlins. So long as they don’t make a noise.) Oh Bora, you did not disappoint.

Noodles the chihuahua, travelling around in a pouch.
Noodles the chihuahua, travelling around in a pouch.

Bora Aksu by Gemma Milly
Bora Aksu by Gemma Milly

This season I think it’s fair to say that there have been rather more overenthusiastic security staff at London Fashion Week than I have encountered in previous years. Bora Aksu was my first show in the main BFC tent in the courtyard at Somerset House on Friday, ask and I got stopped and pulled back after I had already been waved through by the PR by one particularly bulky man surely more used to patrolling the less salubrious nightclubs of the east end. My crime? Holding two tickets instead of one. But only one with a special little star on it. I think the poor man may not have had too many braincells, for sale because last time I checked I was not a conjoined twin.

Bora Aksu by Gemma Milly
Bora Aksu by Gemma Milly

Once inside the large tents with a lit up runway I was forced to stand in the stairwell, decease crushed against the barricade as people continued to squeeze past me. I had always predicted that this would be the hot ticket of the day; I myself have loved good old Bora Aksu for a long time. Ah, how I do love to be proved right.

Bora Aksu by Gemma Milly
Bora Aksu by Gemma Milly

There was nothing overtly flashy about the staging of this show but the whole collection was spectacularly strong, every outfit consistently gorgeous and clever. Bodycon tight tailoring was offset against diaphanous protrusions and alien-esque circuitry stitched details in a subtle colour range of peach, lilac and greys. For the more obvious evening wear options there were black lame versions towards the end; everything worn with shredded leggings, a stylistic touch that was popular in many shows I saw. Bulbous tulip shaped skirts called to mind the early series of Blackadder (yes, I admit that my cultural references are somewhat warped) and my personal favourite featured a kangaroo-esque pouched front, possibly large enough to carry a chihuahua in, if you’re that way inclined. (Disclaimer: I think I may have been subconsciously influenced by this incredibly cute sight at another show. I am coming around to the idea of dogs that look like gremlins. So long as they don’t make a noise.) Oh Bora, you did not disappoint.

Noodles the chihuahua, travelling around in a pouch.
Noodles the chihuahua, travelling around in a pouch.

Bora Aksu by Gemma Milly
Bora Aksu kangaroo pouch dress by Gemma Milly

This season I think it’s fair to say that there have been a few rather more overenthusiastic security staff at London Fashion Week than I have encountered in previous years. Bora Aksu was my first show in the main BFC tent in the courtyard at Somerset House on Friday, ed and I got stopped and pulled back (after I had already been waved through by the PR) by one particularly bulky man surely more used to patrolling the less salubrious nightclubs of the east end. My crime? Holding two tickets instead of one. But only one with a special little star on it. I think the poor man may not have had too many braincells, medications because last time I checked I was not a conjoined twin.

Bora Aksu by Gemma Milly
Bora Aksu by Gemma Milly

Once inside the large black-lined tent with a lit up runway I was forced to stand in the stairwell, clinic crushed against the barricade as people continued to squeeze past me. I had always predicted that this would be the hot ticket of the day; I’ve loved up good old Bora Aksu in Amelia’s Magazine for a long time. Ah, how I do love to be proved right.

Bora Aksu by Gemma Milly
Bora Aksu by Gemma Milly

There was nothing overtly flashy about the staging of this show but the whole collection was spectacularly strong, every outfit consistently gorgeous and clever. Bodycon tight tailoring was offset against diaphanous protrusions and alien-esque circuitry stitched details in a subtle colour range of peach, lilac and greys. For the more obvious evening wear options there were black lame versions towards the end; everything worn with shredded leggings, a stylistic touch that was popular in many shows I saw. Bulbous tulip shaped skirts called to mind the early series of Blackadder (yes, I admit that my cultural references are somewhat warped) and my personal favourite featured a kangaroo-esque pouched front, possibly large enough to carry a chihuahua in, if you’re that way inclined. (Disclaimer: I think I may have been subconsciously influenced by this incredibly cute sight at another show. I am coming around to the idea of dogs that look like gremlins. So long as they don’t make a noise.) Oh Bora, you did not disappoint.

Noodles the chihuahua, travelling around in a pouch.
Noodles the chihuahua, travelling around in a pouch.

Bora Aksu by Gemma Milly
Bora Aksu kangaroo pouch dress by Gemma Milly

This season I think it’s fair to say that there have been a few rather more overenthusiastic security staff at London Fashion Week than I have encountered in previous years. Bora Aksu was my first show in the main BFC tent in the courtyard at Somerset House on Friday, look and I got stopped and pulled back (after I had already been waved through by the PR) by one particularly bulky man surely more used to patrolling the less salubrious nightclubs of the east end. My crime? Holding two tickets instead of one. But only one with a special little star on it. I think the poor man may not have had too many braincells, here because last time I checked I was not a conjoined twin.

Bora Aksu by Gemma Milly
Bora Aksu by Gemma Milly

Once inside the large black-lined tent with a lit up runway I was forced to stand in the stairwell, tadalafil crushed against the barricade as people continued to squeeze past me. I had always predicted that this would be the hot ticket of the day; I’ve loved up good old Bora Aksu in Amelia’s Magazine for a long time. Ah, how I do love to be proved right.

Bora Aksu by Gemma Milly
Bora Aksu by Gemma Milly

There was nothing overtly flashy about the staging of this show but the whole collection was spectacularly strong, every outfit consistently gorgeous and clever. Bodycon tight tailoring was offset against diaphanous protrusions and alien-esque circuitry stitched details in a subtle colour range of peach, lilac and greys. For the more obvious evening wear options there were black lame versions towards the end; everything worn with shredded leggings, a stylistic touch that was popular in many shows I saw. Bulbous tulip shaped skirts called to mind the early series of Blackadder (yes, I admit that my cultural references are somewhat warped) and my personal favourite featured a kangaroo-esque pouched front, possibly large enough to carry a chihuahua in, if you’re that way inclined. (Disclaimer: I think I may have been subconsciously influenced by this incredibly cute sight at another show. I am coming around to the idea of dogs that look like gremlins. So long as they don’t make a noise.) Oh Bora, you did not disappoint.

Noodles the chihuahua, travelling around in a pouch.
Noodles the chihuahua, travelling around in a pouch.

Bora Aksu by Gemma Milly
Bora Aksu kangaroo pouch dress by Gemma Milly

This season I think it’s fair to say that there have been a few rather more overenthusiastic security staff at London Fashion Week than I have encountered in previous years. Bora Aksu was my first show in the main BFC tent in the courtyard at Somerset House on Friday, drug and I got stopped and pulled back (after I had already been waved through by the PR) by one particularly bulky man surely more used to patrolling the less salubrious nightclubs of the east end. My crime? Holding two tickets instead of one. But only one with a special little star on it. I think the poor man may not have had too many braincells, cure because last time I checked I was not a conjoined twin.

Bora Aksu by Gemma Milly
Bora Aksu by Gemma Milly

Once inside the large black-lined tent with a lit up runway I was forced to stand in the stairwell, crushed against the barricade as people continued to squeeze past me. I had always predicted that this would be the hot ticket of the day; I’ve loved up good old Bora Aksu in Amelia’s Magazine for a long time. Ah, how I do love to be proved right.

Bora Aksu by Gemma Milly
Bora Aksu by Gemma Milly

There was nothing overtly flashy about the staging of this show but the whole collection was spectacularly strong, every outfit consistently gorgeous and clever. Bodycon tight tailoring was offset against diaphanous protrusions and alien-esque circuitry stitched details in a subtle colour range of peach, lilac and greys. For the more obvious evening wear options there were black lame versions towards the end; everything worn with shredded leggings, a stylistic touch that was popular in many shows I saw. Bulbous tulip shaped skirts called to mind the early series of Blackadder (yes, I admit that my cultural references are somewhat warped) and my personal favourite featured a kangaroo-esque pouched front, possibly large enough to carry a chihuahua in, if you’re that way inclined. (Disclaimer: I think I may have been subconsciously influenced by this incredibly cute sight at another show. I am coming around to the idea of dogs that look like gremlins. So long as they don’t make a noise.) Oh Bora, you did not disappoint.

Noodles the chihuahua, travelling around in a pouch.
Noodles the chihuahua, travelling around in a pouch.

Bora Aksu by Gemma Milly
Bora Aksu kangaroo pouch dress by Gemma Milly

This season I think it’s fair to say that there have been a few rather more overenthusiastic security staff at London Fashion Week than I have encountered in previous years. Bora Aksu was my first show in the main BFC tent in the courtyard at Somerset House on Friday, order and I got stopped and pulled back (after I had already been waved through by the PR) by one particularly bulky man surely more used to patrolling the less salubrious nightclubs of the east end. My crime? Holding two tickets instead of one. But only one with a special little star on it. I think the poor man may not have had too many braincells, troche because last time I checked I was not a conjoined twin.

Bora Aksu by Gemma Milly
Bora Aksu by Gemma Milly

Once inside the large black-lined tent with a lit up runway I was forced to stand in the stairwell, prescription crushed against the barricade as people continued to squeeze past me. I had always predicted that this would be the hot ticket of the day; I’ve loved up good old Bora Aksu in Amelia’s Magazine for a long time. Ah, how I do love to be proved right.

Bora Aksu by Gemma Milly
Bora Aksu by Gemma Milly

There was nothing overtly flashy about the staging of this show but the whole collection was spectacularly strong, every outfit consistently gorgeous and clever. Bodycon tight tailoring was offset against diaphanous protrusions and alien-esque circuitry stitched details in a subtle colour range of peach, lilac and greys. For the more obvious evening wear options there were black lame versions towards the end; everything worn with shredded leggings, a stylistic touch that was popular in many shows I saw. Bulbous tulip shaped skirts called to mind the early series of Blackadder (yes, I admit that my cultural references are somewhat warped) and my personal favourite featured a kangaroo-esque pouched front, possibly large enough to carry a chihuahua in, if you’re that way inclined. (Disclaimer: I think I may have been subconsciously influenced by this incredibly cute sight at another show. I am coming around to the idea of dogs that look like gremlins. So long as they don’t make a noise.) Oh Bora, you did not disappoint.

Noodles the chihuahua, travelling around in a pouch.
Noodles the chihuahua, travelling around in a pouch.

Bora Aksu by Gemma Milly
Bora Aksu kangaroo pouch dress by Gemma Milly

This season I think it’s fair to say that there have been a few rather more overenthusiastic security staff at London Fashion Week than I have encountered in previous years. Bora Aksu was my first show in the main BFC tent in the courtyard at Somerset House on Friday, sildenafil and I got stopped and pulled back (after I had already been waved through by the PR) by one particularly bulky man surely more used to patrolling the less salubrious nightclubs of the east end. My crime? Holding two tickets instead of one. But only one with a special little star on it. I think the poor man may not have had too many braincells, seek because last time I checked I was not a conjoined twin.

Bora Aksu by Gemma Milly
Bora Aksu by Gemma Milly

Once inside the large black-lined tent with a lit up runway I was forced to stand in the stairwell, crushed against the barricade as people continued to squeeze past me. I had always predicted that this would be the hot ticket of the day; I’ve loved up good old Bora Aksu in Amelia’s Magazine for a long time. Ah, how I do love to be proved right.

Bora Aksu by Gemma Milly
Bora Aksu by Gemma Milly

There was nothing overtly flashy about the staging of this show but the whole collection was spectacularly strong, every outfit consistently gorgeous and clever. Bodycon tight tailoring was offset against diaphanous protrusions and alien-esque circuitry stitched details in a subtle colour range of peach, lilac and greys. For the more obvious evening wear options there were black lame versions towards the end; everything worn with shredded leggings, a stylistic touch that was popular in many shows I saw. Bulbous tulip shaped skirts called to mind the early series of Blackadder (yes, I admit that my cultural references are somewhat warped) and my personal favourite featured a kangaroo-esque pouched front, possibly large enough to carry a chihuahua in, if you’re that way inclined. (Disclaimer: I think I may have been subconsciously influenced by this incredibly cute sight at another show. I am coming around to the idea of dogs that look like gremlins. So long as they don’t make a noise.) Oh Bora, you did not disappoint.

Noodles the chihuahua, travelling around in a pouch.
Noodles the chihuahua, travelling around in a pouch.

Bora Aksu by Gemma Milly
Bora Aksu kangaroo pouch dress by Gemma Milly

This season I think it’s fair to say that there have been a few rather more overenthusiastic security staff at London Fashion Week than I have encountered in previous years. Bora Aksu was my first show in the main BFC tent in the courtyard at Somerset House on Friday, order and I got stopped and pulled back (after I had already been waved through by the PR) by one particularly bulky man surely more used to patrolling the less salubrious nightclubs of the east end. My crime? Holding two tickets instead of one. But only one with a special little star on it. I think the poor man may not have had too many braincells, because last time I checked I was not a conjoined twin.

Bora Aksu by Gemma Milly
Bora Aksu by Gemma Milly

Once inside the large black-lined tent with a lit up runway I was forced to stand in the stairwell, crushed against the barricade as people continued to squeeze past me. I had always predicted that this would be the hot ticket of the day; I’ve loved up good old Bora Aksu in Amelia’s Magazine for a long time. Ah, how I do love to be proved right.

Bora Aksu by Gemma Milly
Bora Aksu by Gemma Milly

There was nothing overtly flashy about the staging of this show but the whole collection was spectacularly strong, every outfit consistently gorgeous and clever. Bodycon tight tailoring was offset against diaphanous protrusions and alien-esque circuitry stitched details in a subtle colour range of peach, lilac and greys. For the more obvious evening wear options there were black lame versions towards the end; everything worn with shredded leggings, a stylistic touch that was popular in many shows I saw. Bulbous tulip shaped skirts called to mind the early series of Blackadder (yes, I admit that my cultural references are somewhat warped) and my personal favourite featured a kangaroo-esque pouched front, possibly large enough to carry a chihuahua in, if you’re that way inclined. (Disclaimer: I think I may have been subconsciously influenced by this incredibly cute sight at another show. I am coming around to the idea of dogs that look like gremlins. So long as they don’t make a noise.) Oh Bora, you did not disappoint.

Noodles the chihuahua, travelling around in a pouch.
Noodles the chihuahua, travelling around in a pouch.

Ashish’s signature sequins opened the autumn/winter 2010 show, viagra dosage and were a fixture throughout the entire collection.

ashish - lfw2010 - jenny robins
Illustration courtesy of Jenny Robins

Now, buy more about Ashish has become a pro at demonstrating the endless possibilities of sequined attire. He can do jumpsuits in tribal prints, tops emblazoned with rabbits and leggings in graphic patterns. In this collection there were striped sequin pyjama suits in lemon yellow and pastel blue, as well as long-sleeved tops that combined sequins and knitwear with exaggerated stitching giving the garments a Frankenstein-aspect.

ashish1

It is a testimony to the designer’s skill that the collection didn’t become formulaic; indeed, Ashish managed to combine sequins into laidback, casually cool looks in a way unseen before (apart from in his previous collections). A great example of this was the checkerboard-print sequined blouse in candyfloss pink and lemon, tucked into high-waisted wool shorts.

ashish2

Ashish was really top of his game when sequins were the focal point of the outfit; as seen in the closing dress entirely made of sequins, which featured peaked padded shoulders and a nipped in waist. But it wasn’t all glitz. Indeed, the overall feel for the collection was decidedly grungy. Ashish partnered his sequined pieces with bobbled, woollen cardigans and sweaters, wide-leg, high-waisted tweed shorts and trousers, as well as belted wool coats. In the press lounge after the show, everyone agreed that the best thing about the show was its accessibility. These are pieces you could easily integrate into your wardrobe; the sequined skirt, the socks, the fingerless gloves.

main_1188

The styling was impeccable, giving the impression of an art student with a limitless bank account running amuck in the East End. There were oxford boots, ribbed socks, beanies and sunglasses accessorised with ironically bad hair-dye jobs in pink and blue, giving the show a punky aesthetic. Now Ashish has mastered all kinds of sequined pieces with playful motifs and jazzy patterns, it will be exciting to see how he evolves next season and whether he will remain the Sultan of Sequins.

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One Response to “London Fashion Week Autumn/ Winter 2010 Catwalk Review: Ashish”

  1. [...] Though eventually he let us through, he wasn’t convinced that our intentions bona fide and his eyes followed us all the way to the press lounge. Of course, as our luck would have it, the press lounge had just closed, so tea and rest was out of the question and as Emma had other commitments to attend to, she sneaked out of the other entrance, avoiding the frenzied security staff and doing the same, I joined the queue for Ashish. [...]

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