London Fashion Week A/W 2010 Catwalk Review: Bernard Chandran

Saturday 19th February 2010 at On|Off, My Beautiful Fashion venue, Illustrations by Katie Harnett

Written by Sally Mumby-Croft


Amelia’s Magazine loves Bernard Chandran. We have not missed a single show since his debut at London Fashion Week and we would not want to. Last season (Spring Summer 10) the audience were treated to Chandran’s visualisation of a very public fear of SARS and pig flu scares by adorning the models with elaborate facemasks. An intriguing accompaniment to the structured dresses and body cast bustiers, the folds of the dresses said to be inspired by a paper lantern hanging in the designer’s studio.



Autumn Winter 2010 is potentially more commercially viable than previous seasons, saw Bernard retain strong architectural forms that broke down into Chandran’s image of the sophisticated cocktail party. The glittering gold suddenly bringing Tom Ford’s ad campaigns for Gucci to mind. AW 10 opened with various portrayals on the androgynous glamour inherent within the working woman’s suit.



The models accompanied by Daphne Guinness hair, face paint, 60’s flicked eyes and block coloured lips wore a pared down approach to Chandran’s architectural style. Sheer nylon cut along the shoulders created a strong contour line along the back, falling into a low waist creating a strong box silhouette.


The block navy blues slowly gave way to luxuriant golds and bronzes. Sleeves became adorned with feathers, big bold feathers to rival your 80’s power shoulder. The collection carried a sense of (what is appearing to be a buzz word) 1970’s glamour, particularly in the full length languid gowns curving off the shoulders exposing the back.


These were clothes at work for work, whilst providing a nice line in sophisticated after work clothes, the nylon contrasted with silk producing a hard yet fluid outline. Movability within the fabrics created through Chandran’s experimental positioning of zips, dropped to almost-but-not-quite slouched hems amongst considered layering.


The midriff so often seen recently, made a sneaky appearance, as did the jumpsuit (here to stay… forever mutating through various fabrics).

Geometric Prints inspired by nature shimmered on fabric, an outcome of Bernard’s ability to be inspired by that which surrounds him (last season SS10 dress shapes were said to be inspired by items within his studio). The embellished dresses beautiful in their peacock colours.


Photographs by Matt Bramford
Illustrations by Katie Harnett


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