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Top 25 Art Blog - Creative Tourist

London Fashion Week A/W 2010 Catwalk Review: Pam Hogg and Nick Cave, Peaches Geldof, Mika

A review of the Pam Hogg show on Monday 22nd February, featuring celebrities including, drumroll please... Siouxie Soux, Jodie Harsh, Mika, Peaches Geldof, Nick Cave, Jaime Winstone, Alice Dellal and Tim Noble & Sue Webster.

Written by Amelia Gregory

Pedal-powered cinema: doesn’t require a spanner in the works

Oxford, approved for the most part, viagra is an academic, see civilised city, but last night it was very much in store for some monkey business. Yes, GAFI (The Great Apes Film Initiative), SOS (Sumatran Orangutan Society) and the Ape Alliance were in town at Oxford Brookes University holding a screening of a primate-driven conservation film, powered, not by dirty old carbon, but by pedal energy.

We’ve covered the subject of pedal-powered cinema in the earth section recently, of course, but this event partnered the unusual film viewing experience with an interesting initiative – namely, using it to help raise awareness of and finance for pedal-powered cinema opportunities in the remotest parts of the world. GAFI, under the wind of its c-founder and filmmaker Madelaine Westwood, has committed itself to showing conservation films to the public in remote areas that highlight the damage they and their society are doing to their own environment.

Madelaine, present at last night’s event, said that GAFI took up pedal-powered cinema as a resource after children in Cameroon had to walk 20 miles to a GAFI screening, only for a priest who had agreed his church could be used as the venue for the screening called it off, leaving the children to walk all the way back home without even having seen the documentary. A pedal-powered cinema kit, made up merely of a bicycle, a car battery, a DVD player and several different cables and coming in at a top price of just £2,000, was the answer. Thanks to this technology, GAFI can now screen films anywhere; on the side of a building’s wall or even a blanket.

Clever piece of kit: all you need is a bicycle, car battery, DVD player and lots of cables

Admittedly, last night’s screening may not have raised much towards this project – admission price was only £3 – but it was certainly well attended by an audience of up to 50 people, and not all of them obvious students either. And, in my opinion, the major feature shown, ‘Losing Tomorrow’ (directed by Patrick Rouxel), was certainly a success. Unlike the disappointment that was ‘Ice Bears Of The Beaufort’ I sat through at the Artivist Film Festival last weekend, this documentary successfully highlighted the problems – complex as they are – that blight both Sumatra’s primates, most of them orangutans, and the people who are involved in the logging industry that is depriving the monkeys of their habitat and the island of its rainforest.

Over the course of the last century, 50 percent of Sumatra’s rainforest has been cleared for logging, so dominant is the industry there – indeed, it’s estimated that just each day an area of rainforest the size of Manhattan is wiped out. However, suddenly to curtail the logging would rob a large number of people their livelihood – impoverished as they are – while, on the flip side, if the logging continues the country’s rainforest will be entirely wiped out and the logging employees without an industry to employ them anyway. It’s a fine Catch-22 with no easy answers. All the same, the audience was informed there is something they can do – contact their local MP or MEP to put pressure on the British government and the European parliament not to allow the import of timber furniture and wood pulp-produced paper that comes out of Sumatra – 75 percent of which is illegal anyway, so widespread is the logging industry there. The British government has so far made no move in this direction, but the European parliament has been looking into it, so there is some optimism, at least.

And we’re off! The cyclist pedals and the audience watches on

But what, specifically, of the pedal-powered cinema experience? Well, I must say, on a personal level, it’s rather an invigorating thing to be part of – or at least watch. On this occasion, as something of a gimmick, British cyclist and 2012 Olympic hopeful David Smith took to the pedals and, to give him his due, kept up an impressive tempo for about 45 minutes, before – a bit pooped – he handed over the reigns to another volunteer. There is certainly something agreeable about watching something worthy and well-crafted, while you’re aware the power that’s generating it is carbon free and directly man-produced – either that, or it’s just proof of the old maxim that it’s always enjoyable to watch someone working while you’re lazing about doing nothing. Either way, the pedal-powered cinema kit worked perfectly well and was a great advert for GAFI’s aspirations.

‘Losing Tomorrow’ was followed by the short documentary ‘Dear Mr President’. Filmed by Madeline Westwood herself, it showed reactions of Sumatran locals while watching the first documentary and then featured one or two of the viewers addressing, direct to camera, the Sumatran president at the time, asking him to do something about the primate/ logging problems in the country. ‘Dear Mr President’, we were subsequently informed, was indeed shown to the president, but just how much that act has achieved, of course, remains to be seen.

And how much can be done, in general, about Sumatra’s rainforest debacle remains to be seen too – but, as mentioned, we can all do something. For those interested, the MSc 10th anniversary conference on primate conservation will also be held at Oxford Brookes University on the April 23 and 24 – it’s open to everyone; the public as well as students and academics.
Pedal-powered cinema: doesn’t require a spanner in the works

Oxford, thumb for the most part, is an academic, civilised city, but last night it was very much in store for some monkey business. Yes, GAFI (The Great Apes Film Initiative), SOS (Sumatran Orangutan Society) and the Ape Alliance were in town at Oxford Brookes University holding a screening of a primate-driven conservation film, powered, not by dirty old carbon, but by pedal energy.

We’ve covered the subject of pedal-powered cinema in the earth section recently, of course, but this event partnered the unusual film viewing experience with an interesting initiative – namely, using it to help raise awareness of and finance for pedal-powered cinema opportunities in the remotest parts of the world. GAFI, under the wind of its c-founder and filmmaker Madelaine Westwood, has committed itself to showing conservation films to the public in remote areas that highlight the damage they and their society are doing to their own environment.

Madelaine, present at last night’s event, said that GAFI took up pedal-powered cinema as a resource after children in Cameroon had to walk 20 miles to a GAFI screening, only for a priest who had agreed his church could be used as the venue for the screening called it off, leaving the children to walk all the way back home without even having seen the documentary. A pedal-powered cinema kit, made up merely of a bicycle, a car battery, a DVD player and several different cables and coming in at a top price of just £2,000, was the answer. Thanks to this technology, GAFI can now screen films anywhere; on the side of a building’s wall or even a blanket.

Clever piece of kit: all you need is a bicycle, car battery, DVD player and lots of cables

Admittedly, last night’s screening may not have raised much towards this project – admission price was only £3 – but it was certainly well attended by an audience of up to 50 people, and not all of them obvious students either. And, in my opinion, the major feature shown, ‘Losing Tomorrow’ (directed by Patrick Rouxel), was certainly a success. Unlike the disappointment that was ‘Ice Bears Of The Beaufort’ I sat through at the Artivist Film Festival last weekend, this documentary successfully highlighted the problems – complex as they are – that blight both Sumatra’s primates, most of them orangutans, and the people who are involved in the logging industry that is depriving the monkeys of their habitat and the island of its rainforest.

Over the course of the last century, 50 percent of Sumatra’s rainforest has been cleared for logging, so dominant is the industry there – indeed, it’s estimated that just each day an area of rainforest the size of Manhattan is wiped out. However, suddenly to curtail the logging would rob a large number of people their livelihood – impoverished as they are – while, on the flip side, if the logging continues the country’s rainforest will be entirely wiped out and the logging employees without an industry to employ them anyway. It’s a fine Catch-22 with no easy answers. All the same, the audience was informed there is something they can do – contact their local MP or MEP to put pressure on the British government and the European parliament not to allow the import of timber furniture and wood pulp-produced paper that comes out of Sumatra – 75 percent of which is illegal anyway, so widespread is the logging industry there. The British government has so far made no move in this direction, but the European parliament has been looking into it, so there is some optimism, at least.

And we’re off! The cyclist pedals and the audience watches on

But what, specifically, of the pedal-powered cinema experience? Well, I must say, on a personal level, it’s rather an invigorating thing to be part of – or at least watch. On this occasion, as something of a gimmick, British cyclist and 2012 Olympic hopeful David Smith took to the pedals and, to give him his due, kept up an impressive tempo for about 45 minutes, before – a bit pooped – he handed over the reigns to another volunteer. There is certainly something agreeable about watching something worthy and well-crafted, while you’re aware the power that’s generating it is carbon free and directly man-produced – either that, or it’s just proof of the old maxim that it’s always enjoyable to watch someone working while you’re lazing about doing nothing. Either way, the pedal-powered cinema kit worked perfectly well and was a great advert for GAFI’s aspirations.

‘Losing Tomorrow’ was followed by the short documentary ‘Dear Mr President’. Filmed by Madeline Westwood herself, it showed reactions of Sumatran locals while watching the first documentary and then featured one or two of the viewers addressing, direct to camera, the Sumatran president at the time, asking him to do something about the primate/ logging problems in the country. ‘Dear Mr President’, we were subsequently informed, was indeed shown to the president, but just how much that act has achieved, of course, remains to be seen.

And how much can be done, in general, about Sumatra’s rainforest debacle remains to be seen too – but, as mentioned, we can all do something. For those interested, the MSc 10th anniversary conference on primate conservation will also be held at Oxford Brookes University on the April 23 and 24 – it’s open to everyone; the public as well as students and academics.
Pam-Hogg-A/W 2010 by Etiene  Del Monte
Pam Hogg by Etiene Del Monte.

Pam Hogg can pull in an all star rocker crowd and she knows it. I wondered if this begat the complex star sticker system on our invites, drugs which involved double gold stars for rock royalty (or just quite crap celebs), salve single gold stars (presumably for those not destined to make the next day’s paper but still quite important) and any number of other coloured stars for lesser mortals. The mere presence of a star was in itself no assurance of speedy entry, so it was lucky that I and a few of my contributors were already in Victoria House, drinking cups of tea on funny shaped chairs next to an abandoned display.

Amelia Gregory, Sally Mumby-Croft, Satu Fox
Yup, looking happy there girls. That’s me with contributors Satu Fox and Sally Mumby-Croft. Who don’t like posing clearly.

Jodie Marsh at Pam Hogg.
Jodie Marsh at Pam Hogg. This is what you look like if you make an effort, for a bit of contrast like…

This meant that we got to the front of the queue where we were able to get a perfect view of all the celebs as they came prancing in. Jodie Harsh looked every bit as wonderful in the flesh as she does in photos, but much less false (she puts natural born women to shame) and was more than happy to pose for me. Then came Tim Noble and Sue Webster, scowling as usual… Nick Cave swept through like a gothic prince, then came Pearl Lowe (dreadful biography, don’t do it) the execrable Jaime Winstone, Peaches Geldof (shoot me now) and apparently Mika in drag, though I didn’t see him at the time (bonus of leaving your write up awhile and being able to trawl the internet)

Jaimie Winstone at Pam Hogg
Jaime Winstone in the front row. She kept hoiking up her dress.

Peaches Geldof at Pam Hogg
Peaches Geldof in the limelight. Again. With a man who looked like the mascot for KFC. Great look.

We were also unceremoniously shoved aside by lots of arch looking people who I am sure were very rock ‘n’ roll but I have absolutely no idea who they actually were. Behind the barrage of hapless PRs – “Don’t worry, you’ll all be able to come in soon” – we could see people sloshing back free booze from a makeshift bar. How convenient that it should run out by the time us plebs were hastily shepherded in, just moments before the show started. Named Valley of the Shadow of Darkness, our noncommittal grey invites all had a tribute to Alexander McQueen at the bottom of the invitation, reading Lee RIP 1969-2010. Were they good friends? Or was she just showing fashionable solidarity?

Siouxie Soux at Pam Hogg by Amelia Gregory
Siouxie Soux at Pam Hogg. All photography by Amelia Gregory.

Cult 80s singer Siouxie Sioux opened the show, looking extremely dramatic in barely there lace topped with a netting puffball. Unfortunately I don’t think the look did her many favours – she looked so severe that not only did I have no idea who she was, but I actually thought she was a middle-aged man in drag. Woops. She is 52 years old at the time of writing but she looks a helluva lot better in recent pictures found on google, so yes, Siouxie, I know you and Pammie have been bessie mates for, like, forever, but next time you might want to but your foot down before stepping out in something so unflattering. Here in an incongruous shot of the pair of them with Dame Shirley Bassey: surely not a bessie too?

Pam Hogg. Sophie Willing, photography by Amelia Gregory
Pam Hogg. photography by Amelia Gregory
Pam Hogg. Alice Dellal. photography by Amelia Gregory
Pam Hogg. photography by Amelia Gregory
Pam Hogg. photography by Amelia Gregory
Pam Hogg. Ben Grimes. photography by Amelia Gregory
Pam Hogg. photography by Amelia Gregory
Pam Hogg. photography by Amelia Gregory
Pam Hogg. photography by Amelia Gregory
Pam Hogg. photography by Amelia Gregory
Sophie Willing at Pam Hogg

Of course it’s well known that no one does glitzy catsuits and sexed-up bodycon quite like Pam Hogg, and so it was that we were treated to starry model after starry model attired in all manner of skin tight mesh pants suits, mini-dresses, many more netting hair bombs, and lots of bum-bouncing tulle with a bit of well placed ribbon or fluff. Panels of rubberised fabric, lace and shiny lame gave a futuristic feel which was emphasised in the bold black eyebrows, and splashes of silver, gold and bright red punctuated the otherwise steely palette of black, dark grey and white. One of the most striking red outfits was modelled by Alice Dellal, she of the asymmetric (currently) blonde hair and sulky pout, and has since been modelled by no less than Lady Gaga (on the short trip from the O2 Arena to her hotel, if reports are to be believed), though I’m not sure she really pulled it off with those ripped fishnets. I think Pam Hogg is worn most successfully when all around is sleek.

Pam-Hogg-A/W 2010-sophie willing & jethro cave, by Etiene Del Monte
Sophie Willing & Jethro Cave, by Etiene Del Monte.

When the lone male model stopped for a mannered snog with one of the girls halfway down the runway to whoops and cheers, I knew they must be well known. A google search further revealed the real reason for Nick Cave’s attendance: the beautiful skinny boy was none other than his son Jethro Cave, and he was kissing Sophie Willing, a fellow Ozzie model and also his girlfriend. Together they appear in a tacky bondage inspired photoshoot called Boys Will Be Toys. Tasteful. Apparently daddy was very proud. Also in attendance was model du jour, Ben Grimes. That’s a girl in case you were wondering.

Pam-Hogg-A/W 2010-Etiene Del Monte
Sophie Willing plays the sexy angel, by Etiene Del Monte.

Sophie Willing and Jethro Cave at Pam Hogg

Siouxie Soux and Pam Hogg
Siouxie Soux and Pam Hogg.

At the end Pam came right down along the catwalk in a hug with Siouxie Soux towering over her – she looked very much like a cartoon character in skintight shiny black, sporting fake bright yellow hair. She has always catered well to rock royalty but I can suddenly see why she might appeal to Lady Gaga’s pop sensibility as well. But I’m left with the pressing question: who dyed their hair that vicious shade of Ed the Duck yellow first?

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3 Responses to “London Fashion Week A/W 2010 Catwalk Review: Pam Hogg and Nick Cave, Peaches Geldof, Mika”

  1. Amica says:

    Hahaha,I love your fashion posts so much!! KFC mascot…that sent the tea into the keyboard. Again.

  2. Mary T says:

    Um, embittered at your (un)fashionable irrelevence much?

  3. Amelia says:

    I would reply with something witty but I have no idea what you actually mean, sorry Mary!

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