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Top 25 Art Blog - Creative Tourist

London Fashion Week A/W 2010 Catwalk Review: Ramon Gurillo and Bodyamr

A review of knitwear designer Ramon Gurillo at Victoria House, and the Bodyamr sports luxe collection over at Freemasons' Hall on Friday 19th February. With illustrations by Katie Harnett and Saroj Patel.

Written by Amelia Gregory

Charles Anastase4

Watching the show, nurse seek something niggled, buy information pills what reference was missing – apart from the immediates being the 70’s and the French Revolution – there was something else, something that was coming through in the occasional bundled up model. I battered it aside, thinking no – these thoughts are from reading The Road recently, and it’s discriptions of the belegaured wrapped up souls have become stuck in one’s mind.

And then out walked the below outfit, framed by the soft bordering on romantic hair, taffata and block colours of the thick thick Anastase layers, was the only full face painted experience of the whole show. In the context of the aforementioned taffata it provided a disconcerting effect, summering images of the cults avoided in desperation along the desolated world in Cormac McCarthy’s The Road.

Charles Anastase 5

Not wanting to read too much into this, thinking the show contained enough references- from languid lazy glamour completed by Linda Farrow sunglasses to the idea that one might have preferred to have been born in France several years ago. The thought that this was another designer considering the apocalyptic nature of future was left dangling, as I unfortunately did not have access to a press release until The Telegraph posted on the show, answered my suspicions:

“Charles Anastase, made climate change the theme of his collection for next autumn/winter”.

Now I seriously doubt that in an actual apocalypse we would wear towering wedges whilst bound in constrictive felt, it is always interesting to see how designers portray thoughts and fears from outside of Fashion. Last season saw Bernard Chandran, James Long and Katie Eary presented two vesions of clothes to be worn in a dystopic future. Whilst harder than Anastase, a sense of fear of the unknown remains within all three collections.

Charles Anastase 1

Anastase’s was a short introduction into the designer’s current range of thoughts. It will be interesting to see what is presented at next season’s show. It was great to see a return to the sophistication that length and fabric can offe after what seems like endless seasons of thigh high body tight flesh exposing nothingness.

Charles Anastase2

Photographs by Elizabeth Johnson
Charles Anastase4

Watching the show, thumb something niggled, viagra order what reference was missing – apart from the immediates being the 70’s and the French Revolution – there was something else, something that was coming through in the occasional bundled up model. I battered it aside, thinking no – these thoughts are from reading The Road recently, and it’s discriptions of the belegaured wrapped up souls have become stuck in one’s mind.

And then out walked the below outfit, framed by the soft bordering on romantic hair, taffata and block colours of the thick thick Anastase layers, was the only full face painted experience of the whole show. In the context of the aforementioned taffata it provided a disconcerting effect, summering images of the cults avoided in desperation along the desolated world in Cormac McCarthy’s The Road.

Charles Anastase 5

Not wanting to read too much into this, thinking the show contained enough references- from languid lazy glamour completed by Linda Farrow sunglasses to the idea that one might have preferred to have been born in France several years ago. The thought that this was another designer considering the apocalyptic nature of future was left dangling, as I unfortunately did not have access to a press release until The Telegraph posted on the show, answered my suspicions:

“Charles Anastase, made climate change the theme of his collection for next autumn/winter”.

Now I seriously doubt that in an actual apocalypse we would wear towering wedges whilst bound in constrictive felt, it is always interesting to see how designers portray thoughts and fears from outside of Fashion. Last season saw Bernard Chandran, James Long and Katie Eary presented two vesions of clothes to be worn in a dystopic future. Whilst harder than Anastase, a sense of fear of the unknown remains within all three collections.

Charles Anastase 1

Anastase’s was a short introduction into the designer’s current range of thoughts. It will be interesting to see what is presented at next season’s show. It was great to see a return to the sophistication that length and fabric can offe after what seems like endless seasons of thigh high body tight flesh exposing nothingness.

Charles Anastase2

Photographs by Elizabeth Johnson
Charles Anastase4

Watching the show, this something niggled, stuff what reference was missing – apart from the immediates being the 70’s and the French Revolution – there was something else, something that was coming through in the occasional bundled up model. I battered it aside, thinking no – these thoughts are from reading The Road recently, and it’s discriptions of the belegaured wrapped up souls have become stuck in one’s mind.

And then out walked the below outfit, framed by the soft bordering on romantic hair, taffata and block colours of the thick thick Anastase layers, was the only full face painted experience of the whole show. In the context of the aforementioned taffata it provided a disconcerting effect, summering images of the cults avoided in desperation along the desolated world in Cormac McCarthy’s The Road.

Charles Anastase 5

Not wanting to read too much into this, thinking the show contained enough references- from languid lazy glamour completed by Linda Farrow sunglasses to the idea that one might have preferred to have been born in France several years ago. The thought that this was another designer considering the apocalyptic nature of future was left dangling, as I unfortunately did not have access to a press release until The Telegraph posted on the show, answered my suspicions:

“Charles Anastase, made climate change the theme of his collection for next autumn/winter”.

Now I seriously doubt that in an actual apocalypse we would wear towering wedges whilst bound in constrictive felt, it is always interesting to see how designers portray thoughts and fears from outside of Fashion. Last season saw Bernard Chandran, James Long and Katie Eary presented two vesions of clothes to be worn in a dystopic future. Whilst harder than Anastase, a sense of fear of the unknown remains within all three collections.

Charles Anastase 1

Anastase’s was a short introduction into the designer’s current range of thoughts. It will be interesting to see what is presented at next season’s show. It was great to see a return to the sophistication that length and fabric can offe after what seems like endless seasons of thigh high body tight flesh exposing nothingness.

Charles Anastase2

Photographs by Elizabeth Johnson
Charles Anastase4

Watching the show, viagra something niggled, pills what reference was missing – apart from the immediates being the 70’s and the French Revolution – there was something else, case something that was coming through in the occasional bundled up model. I battered it aside, thinking no – these thoughts are from reading The Road recently, and it’s discriptions of the belegaured wrapped up souls have become stuck in one’s mind.

And then out walked the below outfit, framed by the soft bordering on romantic hair, taffata and block colours of the thick thick Anastase layers, was the only full face painted experience of the whole show. In the context of the aforementioned taffata it provided a disconcerting effect, summering images of the cults avoided in desperation along the desolated world in Cormac McCarthy’s The Road.

Charles Anastase 5

Not wanting to read too much into this, thinking the show contained enough references- from languid lazy glamour completed by Linda Farrow sunglasses to the idea that one might have preferred to have been born in France several years ago. The thought that this was another designer considering the apocalyptic nature of future was left dangling, as I unfortunately did not have access to a press release until The Telegraph posted on the show, answered my suspicions:

“Charles Anastase, made climate change the theme of his collection for next autumn/winter”.

Now I seriously doubt that in an actual apocalypse we would wear towering wedges whilst bound in constrictive felt, it is always interesting to see how designers portray thoughts and fears from outside of Fashion. Last season saw Bernard Chandran, James Long and Katie Eary presented two vesions of clothes to be worn in a dystopic future. Whilst harder than Anastase, a sense of fear of the unknown remains within all three collections.

Charles Anastase 1

Anastase’s was a short introduction into the designer’s current range of thoughts. It will be interesting to see what is presented at next season’s show. It was great to see a return to the sophistication that length and fabric can offe after what seems like endless seasons of thigh high body tight flesh exposing nothingness.

Charles Anastase2

Photographs by Elizabeth Johnson
Charles Anastase4

Watching the show, discount something niggled, pharmacy what reference was missing – apart from the immediates being the 70’s and the French Revolution – there was something else, price something that was coming through in the occasional bundled up model. I battered it aside, thinking no – these thoughts are from reading The Road recently, and it’s discriptions of the belegaured wrapped up souls have become stuck in one’s mind.

And then out walked the below outfit, framed by the soft bordering on romantic hair, taffata and block colours of the thick thick Anastase layers, was the only full face painted experience of the whole show. In the context of the aforementioned taffata it provided a disconcerting effect, summering images of the cults avoided in desperation along the desolated world in Cormac McCarthy’s The Road.

Charles Anastase 5

Charles Anastase Autumn Winter 2010 was a busy show reference wise – from languid lazy glamour completed by Linda Farrow sunglasses to the idea that one might have preferred to have been born in France several years ago. The thought that another was designer considering the apocalyptic nature of future was left dangling. Until The Telegraph posted on the show, answering my suspicions:

“Charles Anastase, made climate change the theme of his collection for next autumn/winter”.

Now I seriously doubt that in an actual apocalypse we would wear towering wedges whilst bound in constrictive felt, however, it is always interesting to see how designers portray thoughts and fears from the News or mass media obsessions. Last season saw Bernard Chandran, James Long and Katie Eary present their visions of what clothes to be worn in a dystopic future. Whilst harder than Anastase, a sense of fear of the unknown remains within all four of these exploratory collections.

Charles Anastase 1

Anastase’s was a short introduction into the designer’s current range of thoughts and experimentations – from the aforementioned to the patterns that could only be described as 70′s carpet chic. It was at the same time, great to see a return to the potential sophistication offered by length and fabric after what feels like endless seasons of thigh high body tight flesh exposing nothingness. It will be interesting to see how these themes will be developed for next season’s show.

Charles Anastase2

Photographs by Elizabeth Johnson
Prophetik by Etiene Del Monte
Prophetik by Etiene Del Monte

We were shepherded into the one of the grand rooms at the Freemasons’ Hall by a blonde lady on a very high horse. In the atrium we were offered organic chocolates to nibble on (by Chocolala, they were AMAZING) and plastic cups of wine. All of this before lunchtime! So far so very extravagant.

A pretty curlicued silver sticker on my Prophetik flyer boded well, ed and I was duly ushered to the front row. Always nice to know you’re meant to be there, page rather than trying it on in the hope no one will move you. Whilst the show took forever to start, Matt and I dug around in the overflowing goodie bags, revealing a suit bag, an iphone amplifier dock, a sponsored notebook, organic toiletries and more chocolate, to name just a few items of ecojunk. Free frippery is to be expected at Fashion Week but I use the term ecojunk because of Prophetik’s “wearable philosophy” of promoting eco fashion. Of course any move towards sustainability is to be applauded, but then surely stick to recycled gifts? Or something more suited to said philosophy? Needless to say I took everything home anyway because that’s the way I’m programmed, but I couldn’t help feeling just a little bit guilty in doing so.

Eventually we heard the strains of a live violinist, who was soon joined by an acoustic guitarist, followed shortly after by an entire middle aged rock band, replete with bare chests and swinging medallions. Checking my show notes I’ve since discovered that this band included none other than members of Def Leppard and the Sex Pistols. Woah! Veering unexpectedly to a grinding holt, Massive Attack suddenly crashed onto the sound system. Then it was back to live rock, a bit of piped rave and finally the beautiful strains of the gospel song “I’ll fly away” – a refrain that I sing around the camp fire with friends.

I expect this was all meant to segue seamlessly together but this was sadly not the case, and it says something that it’s the music that I am talking about first and not the clothes – overall it was an unsatisfactory and entirely unnecessary distraction.

Prophetik by Etiene Del Monte
Prophetik by Etiene Del Monte

The clothes? Well I was going to be quite rude about them, but then I met the PR who invited me, and read a bit more about Prophetik on their website, discovering that there is a touching ecological and communitarian philosophy behind the brand. And then I met the PR again in the queue for a show the next day, and this time was introduced to the American designer Jeff Garner. Aiee!! So I will be a little nicer.

I loved the way the show opened (music aside), with a girl whisking between the musicians in a black dress like a fair maiden in mourning. From then on jodphurs and military themed tailored pieces jostled alongside bulbous bell shaped crinoline fairytale princess dresses (my favourite outfits) next to ill advised crushed velvet sweeping gowns – all worn by fair skinned ladies with blonde or red hair. There were a few bits of menswear thrown in for good measure and I found myself idly wondering how I ever used to find male models attractive (so young, so… nothingy. I must be getting old) – instead I was more interested in looking at the wiggy men in the fancy paintings on the walls. When I checked my twitter feed in a moment of boredom (sorry nice PR lady, sorry Mr. Designer man) I noted that everyone seemed inadversely excited by the thigh high boots. Is that a good sign? I suppose I just felt that the whole thing was a bit of a mishmash – with some interesting pieces that didn’t ever seem to add up to a strong whole collection. And the music really really didn’t help matters. At all. Got that?

However, I think it’s admirable that Prophetik are taking ecological ideals into consideration and hope to read up more on their philosophy at a point where I am not madly dashing around fashion week. In the meantime, I wish them all the best and hope I a) don’t run into them again at the shows or b) they’re happy to take on board a bit of constructive criticism. Please don’t kill me! And aren’t the illustrations by Etiene del Monte wonderful?

Prophetik by Etiene Del Monte
Prophetik by Etiene Del Monte

We were shepherded into the one of the grand rooms at the Freemasons’ Hall by a blonde lady on a very high horse. In the atrium we were offered organic chocolates to nibble on (by Chocolala, tadalafil they were AMAZING) and plastic cups of wine. All of this before lunchtime! So far so very extravagant.

A pretty curlicued silver sticker on my Prophetik flyer boded well, buy more about and I was duly ushered to the front row. Always nice to know you’re meant to be there, viagra 40mg rather than trying to pull a fast one in the hope that no one will move you on. Whilst the show took forever to start, Matt and I dug around in the overflowing goodie bags, revealing a suit bag, an iphone amplifier dock, a sponsored notebook, organic toiletries and more chocolate, to name just a few items of ecojunk. Free frippery is to be expected at Fashion Week but I use the term ecojunk because of Prophetik’s “wearable philosophy” of promoting eco fashion. Of course any move towards sustainability is to be applauded, but then surely stick to recycled gifts? Or something more suited to said philosophy? Needless to say I took everything home anyway because that’s the way I’m programmed, but I couldn’t help feeling just a little bit guilty in doing so.

Eventually we heard the strains of a live violinist, who was soon joined by an acoustic guitarist, followed shortly after by an entire middle aged rock band, replete with bare chests and swinging medallions. Checking my show notes I’ve since discovered that this band included none other than members of Def Leppard and the Sex Pistols. Woah! Veering unexpectedly to a grinding holt, Massive Attack suddenly crashed onto the sound system. Then it was back to live rock, a bit of piped rave and finally the beautiful strains of the gospel song “I’ll fly away” – a refrain that I like to sing around the camp fire with friends. I expect this was all meant to segue seamlessly together but this was sadly not the case, and it says something that it’s the music that I am talking about first and not the clothes – overall it was an unsatisfactory and entirely unnecessary distraction.

Prophetik by Etiene Del Monte
Prophetik by Etiene Del Monte

The clothes? Well, I met the PR who invited me in the queue for a show on Saturday, and was introduced to the American designer Jeff Garner, (Aiee!!) and I’ve since read a bit more about Prophetik on their website, discovering that there is a touching ecological and communitarian philosophy behind the brand. So I will be considered in what I say…

I loved the way the show opened (music aside), with a girl whisking between the musicians in a black dress like a fair maiden in mourning. From then on jodphurs and military themed tailored pieces jostled alongside bulbous bell shaped crinoline fairytale princess dresses (my favourite outfits) next to ill advised crushed velvet sweeping gowns – all worn by fair skinned ladies with blonde or red hair. There were a few bits of menswear thrown in for good measure and I found myself idly wondering how I ever used to find male models attractive (so young, so… nothingy. I must be getting old) – instead I was more interested in looking at the wiggy men in the fancy paintings on the walls. When I checked my twitter feed in a moment of boredom (sorry nice PR lady, sorry Mr. Designer man) I noted that everyone seemed inadversely excited by the thigh high boots. Is that a good sign? I suppose I just felt that the whole thing was a bit of a mishmash – with some interesting pieces that didn’t ever seem to add up to a strong whole collection. And the music really really didn’t help matters. At all. Got that?

However, I think it’s admirable that Prophetik are taking ecological ideals into consideration and hope to read up more on their philosophy at a point where I am not madly dashing around fashion week. In the meantime, I wish them all the best and hope I a) don’t run into them again at the shows or b) they’re happy to take on board a bit of constructive criticism. Please don’t kill me! And aren’t the illustrations by Etiene del Monte wonderful?

Prophetik by Etiene Del Monte
Prophetik by Etiene Del Monte

We were shepherded into the one of the grand rooms at the Freemasons’ Hall by a blonde lady on a very high horse. In the atrium we were offered organic chocolates to nibble on (by Chocolala, tadalafil they were AMAZING) and plastic cups of wine. All of this before lunchtime! So far so very extravagant.

A pretty curlicued silver sticker on my Prophetik flyer boded well, ailment and I was duly ushered to the front row. Always nice to know you’re meant to be there, pharm rather than trying to pull a fast one in the hope that no one will move you on. Whilst the show took forever to start, Matt and I dug around in the overflowing goodie bags, revealing a suit bag, an iphone amplifier dock, a sponsored notebook, organic toiletries and more chocolate, to name just a few items of ecojunk. Free frippery is to be expected at Fashion Week but I use the term ecojunk because of Prophetik’s “wearable philosophy” of promoting eco fashion. Of course any move towards sustainability is to be applauded, but then surely stick to recycled gifts? Or something more suited to said philosophy? Needless to say I took everything home anyway because that’s the way I’m programmed, but I couldn’t help feeling just a little bit guilty in doing so.

Eventually we heard the strains of a live violinist, who was soon joined by an acoustic guitarist, followed shortly after by an entire middle aged rock band, replete with bare chests and swinging medallions. Checking my show notes I’ve since discovered that this band included none other than members of Def Leppard and the Sex Pistols. Woah! Veering unexpectedly to a grinding holt, Massive Attack suddenly crashed onto the sound system. Then it was back to live rock, a bit of piped rave and finally the beautiful strains of the gospel song “I’ll fly away” – a refrain that I sing around the camp fire with friends.

I expect this was all meant to segue seamlessly together but this was sadly not the case, and it says something that it’s the music that I am talking about first and not the clothes – overall it was an unsatisfactory and entirely unnecessary distraction.

Prophetik by Etiene Del Monte
Prophetik by Etiene Del Monte

The clothes? Well I was going to be quite rude about them, but then I met the PR who invited me, and read a bit more about Prophetik on their website, discovering that there is a touching ecological and communitarian philosophy behind the brand. And then I met the PR again in the queue for a show the next day, and this time was introduced to the American designer Jeff Garner. Aiee!! So I will be a little nicer.

I loved the way the show opened (music aside), with a girl whisking between the musicians in a black dress like a fair maiden in mourning. From then on jodphurs and military themed tailored pieces jostled alongside bulbous bell shaped crinoline fairytale princess dresses (my favourite outfits) next to ill advised crushed velvet sweeping gowns – all worn by fair skinned ladies with blonde or red hair. There were a few bits of menswear thrown in for good measure and I found myself idly wondering how I ever used to find male models attractive (so young, so… nothingy. I must be getting old) – instead I was more interested in looking at the wiggy men in the fancy paintings on the walls. When I checked my twitter feed in a moment of boredom (sorry nice PR lady, sorry Mr. Designer man) I noted that everyone seemed inadversely excited by the thigh high boots. Is that a good sign? I suppose I just felt that the whole thing was a bit of a mishmash – with some interesting pieces that didn’t ever seem to add up to a strong whole collection. And the music really really didn’t help matters. At all. Got that?

However, I think it’s admirable that Prophetik are taking ecological ideals into consideration and hope to read up more on their philosophy at a point where I am not madly dashing around fashion week. In the meantime, I wish them all the best and hope I a) don’t run into them again at the shows or b) they’re happy to take on board a bit of constructive criticism. Please don’t kill me! And aren’t the illustrations by Etiene del Monte wonderful?

Prophetik by Etiene Del Monte
Prophetik by Etiene Del Monte

We were shepherded into the one of the grand rooms at the Freemasons’ Hall by a blonde lady on a very high horse. In the atrium we were offered organic chocolates to nibble on (by Chocolala, store they were AMAZING) and plastic cups of wine. All of this before lunchtime! So far so very extravagant.

A pretty curlicued silver sticker on my Prophetik flyer boded well, information pills and I was duly ushered to the front row. Always nice to know you’re meant to be there, approved rather than trying to pull a fast one in the hope that no one will move you on. Whilst the show took forever to start, Matt and I dug around in the overflowing goodie bags, revealing a suit bag, an iphone amplifier dock, a sponsored notebook, organic toiletries and more chocolate, to name just a few items of ecojunk. Free frippery is to be expected at Fashion Week but I use the term ecojunk because of Prophetik’s “wearable philosophy” of promoting eco fashion. Of course any move towards sustainability is to be applauded, but then surely stick to recycled gifts? Or something more suited to said philosophy? Needless to say I took everything home anyway because that’s the way I’m programmed, but I couldn’t help feeling just a little bit guilty in doing so.

Eventually we heard the strains of a live violinist, who was soon joined by an acoustic guitarist, followed shortly after by an entire middle aged rock band, replete with bare chests and swinging medallions. Checking my show notes I’ve since discovered that this band included none other than members of Def Leppard and the Sex Pistols. Woah! Veering unexpectedly to a grinding holt, Massive Attack suddenly crashed onto the sound system. Then it was back to live rock, a bit of piped rave and finally the beautiful strains of the gospel song “I’ll fly away” – a refrain that I sing around the camp fire with friends.

I expect this was all meant to segue seamlessly together but this was sadly not the case, and it says something that it’s the music that I am talking about first and not the clothes – overall it was an unsatisfactory and entirely unnecessary distraction.

Prophetik by Etiene Del Monte
Prophetik by Etiene Del Monte

The clothes? Well I was going to be quite rude about them, but then I met the PR who invited me, and read a bit more about Prophetik on their website, discovering that there is a touching ecological and communitarian philosophy behind the brand. And then I met the PR again in the queue for a show the next day, and this time was introduced to the American designer Jeff Garner. Aiee!! So I will be a little nicer.

I loved the way the show opened (music aside), with a girl whisking between the musicians in a black dress like a fair maiden in mourning. From then on jodphurs and military themed tailored pieces jostled alongside bulbous bell shaped crinoline fairytale princess dresses (my favourite outfits) next to ill advised crushed velvet sweeping gowns – all worn by fair skinned ladies with blonde or red hair. There were a few bits of menswear thrown in for good measure and I found myself idly wondering how I ever used to find male models attractive (so young, so… nothingy. I must be getting old) – instead I was more interested in looking at the wiggy men in the fancy paintings on the walls. When I checked my twitter feed in a moment of boredom (sorry nice PR lady, sorry Mr. Designer man) I noted that everyone seemed inadversely excited by the thigh high boots. Is that a good sign? I suppose I just felt that the whole thing was a bit of a mishmash – with some interesting pieces that didn’t ever seem to add up to a strong whole collection. And the music really really didn’t help matters. At all. Got that?

However, I think it’s admirable that Prophetik are taking ecological ideals into consideration and hope to read up more on their philosophy at a point where I am not madly dashing around fashion week. In the meantime, I wish them all the best and hope I a) don’t run into them again at the shows or b) they’re happy to take on board a bit of constructive criticism. Please don’t kill me! And aren’t the illustrations by Etiene del Monte wonderful?

Prophetik by Etiene Del Monte
Prophetik by Etiene Del Monte

We were shepherded into the one of the grand rooms at the Freemasons’ Hall by a blonde lady on a very high horse. In the atrium we were offered organic chocolates to nibble on (by Chocolala, viagra order they were AMAZING) and plastic cups of wine. All of this before lunchtime! So far so very extravagant.

A pretty curlicued silver sticker on my Prophetik flyer boded well, visit web and I was duly ushered to the front row. Always nice to know you’re meant to be there, ailment rather than trying to pull a fast one in the hope that no one will move you on. Whilst the show took forever to start, Matt and I dug around in the overflowing goodie bags, revealing a suit bag, an iphone amplifier dock, a sponsored notebook, organic toiletries and more chocolate, to name just a few items of ecojunk. Free frippery is to be expected at Fashion Week but I use the term ecojunk because of Prophetik’s “wearable philosophy” of promoting eco fashion. Of course any move towards sustainability is to be applauded, but then surely stick to recycled gifts? Or something more suited to said philosophy? Needless to say I took everything home anyway because that’s the way I’m programmed, but I couldn’t help feeling just a little bit guilty in doing so.

Eventually we heard the strains of a live violinist, who was soon joined by an acoustic guitarist, followed shortly after by an entire middle aged rock band, replete with bare chests and swinging medallions. Checking my show notes I’ve since discovered that this band included none other than members of Def Leppard and the Sex Pistols. Woah! Veering unexpectedly to a grinding holt, Massive Attack suddenly crashed onto the sound system. Then it was back to live rock, a bit of piped rave and finally the beautiful strains of the gospel song “I’ll fly away” – a refrain that I like to sing around the camp fire with friends. I expect this was all meant to segue seamlessly together but this was sadly not the case, and it says something that it’s the music that I am talking about first and not the clothes – overall it was an unsatisfactory and entirely unnecessary distraction.

Prophetik by Etiene Del Monte
Prophetik by Etiene Del Monte

The clothes? Well, I met the PR who invited me in the queue for a show on Saturday, and was introduced to the American designer Jeff Garner, (Aiee!!) and I’ve since read a bit more about Prophetik on their website, discovering that there is a touching ecological and communitarian philosophy behind the brand. So I will be considered in what I say…

I loved the way the show opened (music aside), with a girl whisking between the musicians in a black dress like a fair maiden in mourning. From then on jodphurs and military themed tailored pieces jostled alongside bulbous bell shaped crinoline fairytale princess dresses (my favourite outfits) next to ill advised crushed velvet sweeping gowns – all worn by fair skinned ladies with blonde or red hair. There were a few bits of menswear thrown in for good measure and I found myself idly wondering how I ever used to find male models attractive (so young, so… nothingy. I must be getting old) – instead I was more interested in looking at the wiggy men in the fancy paintings on the walls. When I checked my twitter feed in a moment of boredom (sorry nice PR lady, sorry Mr. Designer man) I noted that everyone seemed inadversely excited by the thigh high boots. Is that a good sign? I suppose I just felt that the whole thing was a bit of a mishmash – with some interesting pieces that didn’t ever seem to add up to a strong whole collection. And the music really really didn’t help matters. At all. Got that?

However, I think it’s admirable that Prophetik are taking ecological ideals into consideration and hope to read up more on their philosophy at a point where I am not madly dashing around fashion week. In the meantime, I wish them all the best and hope I a) don’t run into them again at the shows or b) they’re happy to take on board a bit of constructive criticism. Please don’t kill me! And aren’t the illustrations by Etiene del Monte wonderful?

Prophetik by Etiene Del Monte
Prophetik by Etiene Del Monte

We were shepherded into the one of the grand rooms at the Freemasons’ Hall by a blonde lady on a very high horse. In the atrium we were offered organic chocolates to nibble on (by Chocolala, discount they were AMAZING) and plastic cups of wine. All of this before lunchtime! So far so very extravagant.

A pretty curlicued silver sticker on my Prophetik flyer boded well, and I was duly ushered to the front row. Always nice to know you’re meant to be there, rather than trying to pull a fast one in the hope that no one will move you on. Whilst the show took forever to start, Matt and I dug around in the overflowing goodie bags, revealing a suit bag, an iphone amplifier dock, a sponsored notebook, organic toiletries and more chocolate, to name just a few items of ecojunk. Free frippery is to be expected at Fashion Week but I use the term ecojunk because of Prophetik’s “wearable philosophy” of promoting eco fashion. Of course any move towards sustainability is to be applauded, but then surely stick to recycled gifts? Or something more suited to said philosophy? Needless to say I took everything home anyway because that’s the way I’m programmed, but I couldn’t help feeling just a little bit guilty in doing so.

Eventually we heard the strains of a live violinist, who was soon joined by an acoustic guitarist, followed shortly after by an entire middle aged rock band, replete with bare chests and swinging medallions. Checking my show notes I’ve since discovered that this band included none other than members of Def Leppard and the Sex Pistols. Woah! Veering unexpectedly to a grinding holt, Massive Attack suddenly crashed onto the sound system. Then it was back to live rock, a bit of piped rave and finally the beautiful strains of the gospel song “I’ll fly away” – a refrain that I like to sing around the camp fire with friends. I expect this was all meant to segue seamlessly together but this was sadly not the case, and it says something that it’s the music that I am talking about first and not the clothes – overall it was an unsatisfactory and entirely unnecessary distraction.

Prophetik by Etiene Del Monte
Prophetik by Etiene Del Monte

The clothes? Well, I met the PR who invited me in the queue for a show on Saturday, and was introduced to the American designer Jeff Garner, (Aiee!! He’s a published poet and all! Quite a good one if the ditty he penned to accompany the show is anything to go by) and I’ve since read a bit more about Prophetik on their website, discovering that there is a touching ecological and communitarian philosophy behind the brand. So I will be considered in what I say…

I loved the way the show opened (music aside), with a girl whisking between the musicians in a black dress like a fair maiden in mourning rushing away from her castle on high. From then on jodphurs and military themed tailored pieces jostled alongside bulbous bell-shaped crinoline fairytale princess dresses (my favourite outfits) next to ill advised crushed velvet sweeping gowns – all worn by fair skinned ladies with blonde or red hair. There were a few bits of menswear thrown in for good measure and I found myself idly wondering how I ever used to find male models attractive (so young, so… nothingy. I must be getting old) – instead I was more interested in looking at the wiggy men in the fancy paintings on the walls. When I checked my twitter feed in a moment of boredom (sorry nice PR lady, sorry Mr. Designer man) I noted that everyone seemed inadversely excited by the thigh high boots. Is that a good sign? I suppose I just felt that the whole thing was a bit of a mishmash – with some interesting pieces that didn’t ever seem to add up to a strong whole collection. And the music really really didn’t help matters. At all. Got that?

However, I think it’s admirable that Prophetik are taking ecological ideals into consideration, making the collection entirely from sustainable fabrics such as hemp, bamboo, organic cotton and recycled materials. I hope to read up more on their philosophy at a point where I am not madly dashing around fashion week. In the meantime, I wish them all the best and hope I a) don’t run into them again at the shows or b) they’re happy to take on board a bit of constructive criticism. Please don’t kill me! And aren’t the illustrations by Etiene del Monte wonderful?

Prophetik by Etiene Del Monte
Prophetik by Etiene Del Monte

We were shepherded into the one of the grand rooms at the Freemasons’ Hall by a blonde lady on a very high horse. In the atrium we were offered organic chocolates to nibble on (by Chocolala, order they were AMAZING) and plastic cups of wine. All of this before lunchtime! So far so very extravagant.

A pretty curlicued silver sticker on my Prophetik flyer boded well, purchase and I was duly ushered to the front row. Always nice to know you’re meant to be there, rather than trying to pull a fast one in the hope that no one will move you on. Whilst the show took forever to start, Matt and I dug around in the overflowing goodie bags, revealing a suit bag, an iphone amplifier dock, a sponsored notebook, organic toiletries and more chocolate, to name just a few items of ecojunk. Free frippery is to be expected at Fashion Week but I use the term ecojunk because of Prophetik’s “wearable philosophy” of promoting eco fashion. Of course any move towards sustainability is to be applauded, but then surely stick to recycled gifts? Or something more suited to said philosophy? Needless to say I took everything home anyway because that’s the way I’m programmed, but I couldn’t help feeling just a little bit guilty in doing so.

Eventually we heard the strains of a live violinist, who was soon joined by an acoustic guitarist, followed shortly after by an entire middle aged rock band, replete with bare chests and swinging medallions. Checking my show notes I’ve since discovered that this band included none other than members of Def Leppard and the Sex Pistols. Woah! Veering unexpectedly to a grinding holt, Massive Attack suddenly crashed onto the sound system. Then it was back to live rock, a bit of piped rave and finally the beautiful strains of the gospel song “I’ll fly away” – a refrain that I like to sing around the camp fire with friends. I expect this was all meant to segue seamlessly together but this was sadly not the case, and it says something that it’s the music that I am talking about first and not the clothes – overall it was an unsatisfactory and entirely unnecessary distraction.

Prophetik by Etiene Del Monte
Prophetik by Etiene Del Monte

The clothes? Well, I met the PR who invited me in the queue for a show on Saturday, and was introduced to the American designer Jeff Garner, (Aiee!! He’s a published poet and all! Quite a good one if the ditty he penned to accompany the show is anything to go by) and I’ve since read a bit more about Prophetik on their website, discovering that there is a touching ecological and communitarian philosophy behind the brand. So I will be considered in what I say…

I loved the way the show opened (music aside), with a girl whisking between the musicians in a black dress like a fair maiden in mourning rushing away from her castle on high. From then on jodphurs and military themed tailored pieces jostled alongside bulbous bell-shaped crinoline fairytale princess dresses (my favourite outfits) next to ill advised crushed velvet sweeping gowns – all worn by fair skinned ladies with blonde or red hair. There were a few bits of menswear thrown in for good measure and I found myself idly wondering how I ever used to find male models attractive (so young, so… nothingy. I must be getting old) – instead I was more interested in looking at the wiggy men in the fancy paintings on the walls. When I checked my twitter feed in a moment of boredom (sorry nice PR lady, sorry Mr. Designer man) I noted that everyone seemed inadversely excited by the thigh high boots. Is that a good sign? I suppose I just felt that the whole thing was a bit of a mishmash – with some interesting pieces that didn’t ever seem to add up to a strong whole collection. And the music really really didn’t help matters. At all. Got that?

However, I think it’s admirable that Prophetik are taking ecological ideals into consideration, making the collection entirely from sustainable fabrics such as hemp, bamboo, organic cotton and recycled materials. I hope to read up more on their philosophy at a point where I am not madly dashing around fashion week. In the meantime, I wish them all the best and hope I a) don’t run into them again at the shows or b) they’re happy to take on board a bit of constructive criticism. Please don’t kill me! And aren’t the illustrations by Etiene del Monte wonderful?

Prophetik by Etiene Del Monte
Prophetik by Etiene Del Monte

We were shepherded into the one of the grand rooms at the Freemasons’ Hall by a blonde lady on a very high horse. In the atrium we were offered organic chocolates to nibble on (by Chocolala, more about they were AMAZING) and plastic cups of wine. All of this before lunchtime! So far so very extravagant.

A pretty curlicued silver sticker on my Prophetik flyer boded well, decease and I was duly ushered to the front row. Always nice to know you’re meant to be there, rather than trying to pull a fast one in the hope that no one will move you on. Whilst the show took forever to start, Matt and I dug around in the overflowing goodie bags, revealing a suit bag, an iphone amplifier dock, a sponsored notebook, organic toiletries and more chocolate, to name just a few items of ecojunk. Free frippery is to be expected at Fashion Week but I use the term ecojunk because of Prophetik’s “wearable philosophy” of promoting eco fashion. Of course any move towards sustainability is to be applauded, but then surely stick to recycled gifts? Or something more suited to said philosophy? Needless to say I took everything home anyway because that’s the way I’m programmed, but I couldn’t help feeling just a little bit guilty in doing so.

Eventually we heard the strains of a live violinist, who was soon joined by an acoustic guitarist, followed shortly after by an entire middle aged rock band, replete with bare chests and swinging medallions. Checking my show notes I’ve since discovered that this band included none other than members of Def Leppard and the Sex Pistols. Woah! Veering unexpectedly to a grinding holt, Massive Attack suddenly crashed onto the sound system. Then it was back to live rock, a bit of piped rave and finally the beautiful strains of the gospel song “I’ll fly away” – a refrain that I like to sing around the camp fire with friends. I expect this was all meant to segue seamlessly together but this was sadly not the case, and it says something that it’s the music that I am talking about first and not the clothes – overall it was an unsatisfactory and entirely unnecessary distraction.

Prophetik by Etiene Del Monte
Prophetik by Etiene Del Monte

The clothes? Well, I met the PR who invited me in the queue for a show on Saturday, and was introduced to the American designer Jeff Garner, (Aiee!! He’s a published poet and all! Quite a good one if the ditty he penned to accompany the show is anything to go by) and I’ve since read a bit more about Prophetik on their website, discovering that there is a touching ecological and communitarian philosophy behind the brand. So I will be considered in what I say…

I loved the way the show opened (music aside), with a girl whisking between the musicians in a black dress like a fair maiden in mourning rushing away from her castle on high. From then on jodphurs and military themed tailored pieces jostled alongside bulbous bell-shaped crinoline fairytale princess dresses (my favourite outfits) next to ill advised crushed velvet sweeping gowns – all worn by fair skinned ladies with blonde or red hair. There were a few bits of menswear thrown in for good measure and I found myself idly wondering how I ever used to find male models attractive (so young, so… nothingy. I must be getting old) – instead I was more interested in looking at the wiggy men in the fancy paintings on the walls. When I checked my twitter feed in a moment of boredom (sorry nice PR lady, sorry Mr. Designer man) I noted that everyone seemed inadversely excited by the thigh high boots. Is that a good sign? I suppose I just felt that the whole thing was a bit of a mishmash – with some interesting pieces that didn’t ever seem to add up to a strong whole collection. And the music really really didn’t help matters. At all. Got that?

However, I think it’s admirable that Prophetik are taking ecological ideals into consideration, making the collection entirely from sustainable fabrics such as hemp, bamboo, organic cotton and recycled materials. I very much hope to read up more on their philosophy at a point where I am not madly dashing around fashion week. In the meantime, I wish them all the best and hope I a) don’t run into them again at the shows or b) they’re happy to take on board a bit of constructive criticism. Please don’t kill me! And aren’t the illustrations by Etiene del Monte wonderful?

Prophetik by Etiene Del Monte
Prophetik by Etiene Del Monte

We were shepherded into the one of the grand rooms at the Freemasons’ Hall by a blonde lady on a very high horse. In the atrium we were offered organic chocolates to nibble on (by Chocolala, and they were AMAZING) and plastic cups of wine. All of this before lunchtime! So far so very extravagant.

A pretty curlicued silver sticker on my Prophetik flyer boded well, what is ed and I was duly ushered to the front row. Always nice to know you’re meant to be there, ambulance rather than trying to pull a fast one in the hope that no one will move you on. Whilst the show took forever to start, Matt and I dug around in the overflowing goodie bags, revealing a suit bag, an iphone amplifier dock, a sponsored notebook, organic toiletries and more chocolate, to name just a few items of ecojunk. Free frippery is to be expected at Fashion Week but I use the term ecojunk because of Prophetik’s “wearable philosophy” of promoting eco fashion. Of course any move towards sustainability is to be applauded, but then surely stick to recycled gifts? Or something more suited to said philosophy? Needless to say I took everything home anyway because that’s the way I’m programmed, but I couldn’t help feeling just a little bit guilty in doing so.

Eventually we heard the strains of a live violinist, who was soon joined by an acoustic guitarist, followed shortly after by an entire middle aged rock band, replete with bare chests and swinging medallions. Checking my show notes I’ve since discovered that this band included none other than members of Def Leppard and the Sex Pistols. Woah! Veering unexpectedly to a grinding holt, Massive Attack suddenly crashed onto the sound system. Then it was back to live rock, a bit of piped rave and finally the beautiful strains of the gospel song “I’ll fly away” – a refrain that I like to sing around the camp fire with friends. I expect this was all meant to segue seamlessly together but this was sadly not the case, and it says something that it’s the music that I am talking about first and not the clothes – overall it was an unsatisfactory and entirely unnecessary distraction.

Prophetik by Etiene Del Monte
Prophetik by Etiene Del Monte

The clothes? Well, I met the PR who invited me in the queue for a show on Saturday, and was introduced to the American designer Jeff Garner, (Aiee!! He’s a published poet and all! Quite a good one if the ditty he penned to accompany the show is anything to go by) and I’ve since read a bit more about Prophetik on their website, discovering that there is a touching ecological and communitarian philosophy behind the brand. So I will be considered in what I say…

I loved the way the show opened (music aside), with a girl whisking between the musicians in a black dress like a fair maiden in mourning rushing away from her castle on high. From then on jodphurs and military themed tailored pieces jostled alongside bulbous bell-shaped crinoline fairytale princess dresses (my favourite outfits) next to ill advised crushed velvet sweeping gowns – all worn by fair skinned ladies with blonde or red hair. There were a few bits of menswear thrown in for good measure and I found myself idly wondering how I ever used to find male models attractive (so young, so… nothingy. I must be getting old) – instead I was more interested in looking at the wiggy men in the fancy paintings on the walls. When I checked my twitter feed in a moment of boredom (sorry nice PR lady, sorry Mr. Designer man) I noted that everyone seemed inadversely excited by the thigh high boots. Is that a good sign? I suppose I just felt that the whole thing was a bit of a mishmash – with some interesting pieces that didn’t ever seem to add up to a strong whole collection. And the music really really didn’t help matters. At all. Got that?

However, I think it’s admirable that Prophetik are taking ecological ideals into consideration, making the collection entirely from sustainable fabrics such as hemp, bamboo, organic cotton and recycled materials. I very much hope to read up more on their philosophy at a point where I am not madly dashing around fashion week. In the meantime, I wish them all the best and hope I a) don’t run into them again at the shows or b) they’re happy to take on board a bit of constructive criticism. Please don’t kill me! And aren’t the illustrations by Etiene del Monte wonderful?

Prophetik by Etiene Del Monte
Prophetik by Etiene Del Monte

We were shepherded into the one of the grand rooms at the Freemasons’ Hall by a blonde lady on a very high horse. In the atrium we were offered organic chocolates to nibble on (by Chocolala, tadalafil they were AMAZING) and plastic cups of wine. All of this before lunchtime! So far so very extravagant.

A pretty curlicued silver sticker on my Prophetik flyer boded well, viagra and I was duly ushered to the front row. Always nice to know you’re meant to be there, rather than trying to pull a fast one in the hope that no one will move you on. Whilst the show took forever to start, Matt and I dug around in the overflowing goodie bags, revealing a suit bag, an iphone amplifier dock, a sponsored notebook, organic toiletries and more chocolate, to name just a few items of ecojunk. Free frippery is to be expected at Fashion Week but I use the term ecojunk because of Prophetik’s “wearable philosophy” of promoting eco fashion. Of course any move towards sustainability is to be applauded, but then surely stick to recycled gifts? Or something more suited to said philosophy? Needless to say I took everything home anyway because that’s the way I’m programmed, but I couldn’t help feeling just a little bit guilty in doing so.

Eventually we heard the strains of a live violinist, who was soon joined by an acoustic guitarist, followed shortly after by an entire middle aged rock band, replete with bare chests and swinging medallions. Checking my show notes I’ve since discovered that this band included none other than members of Def Leppard and the Sex Pistols. Woah! Veering unexpectedly to a grinding holt, Massive Attack suddenly crashed onto the sound system. Then it was back to live rock, a bit of piped rave and finally the beautiful strains of the gospel song “I’ll fly away” – a refrain that I like to sing around the camp fire with friends. I expect this was all meant to segue seamlessly together but this was sadly not the case, and it says something that it’s the music that I am talking about first and not the clothes – overall it was an unsatisfactory and entirely unnecessary distraction.

Prophetik by Etiene Del Monte
Prophetik by Etiene Del Monte

The clothes? Well, I met the PR who invited me in the queue for a show on Saturday, and was introduced to the American designer Jeff Garner, (Aiee!! He’s a published poet and all! Quite a good one if the ditty he penned to accompany the show is anything to go by) and I’ve since read a bit more about Prophetik on their website, discovering that there is a touching ecological and communitarian philosophy behind the brand. So I will be considered in what I say…

I loved the way the show opened (music aside), with a girl whisking between the musicians in a black dress like a fair maiden in mourning rushing away from her castle on high. From then on jodphurs and military themed tailored pieces jostled alongside bulbous bell-shaped crinoline fairytale princess dresses (my favourite outfits) next to ill advised crushed velvet sweeping gowns – all worn by fair skinned ladies with blonde or red hair. There were a few bits of menswear thrown in for good measure and I found myself idly wondering how I ever used to find male models attractive (so young, so… nothingy. I must be getting old) – instead I was more interested in looking at the wiggy men in the fancy paintings on the walls. When I checked my twitter feed in a moment of boredom (sorry nice PR lady, sorry Mr. Designer man) I noted that everyone seemed inadversely excited by the thigh high boots. Is that a good sign? I suppose I just felt that the whole thing was a bit of a mishmash – with some interesting pieces that didn’t ever seem to add up to a strong whole collection. And the music really really didn’t help matters. At all. Got that?

However, I think it’s admirable that Prophetik are taking ecological ideals into consideration, making the collection entirely from sustainable fabrics such as hemp, bamboo, organic cotton and recycled materials. I very much hope to read up more on their philosophy at a point where I am not madly dashing around fashion week. In the meantime, I wish them all the best and hope I a) don’t run into them again at the shows or b) they’re happy to take on board a bit of constructive criticism. Please don’t kill me! And aren’t the illustrations by Etiene del Monte wonderful?

Ramon Gurillo by Katie Harnett
Ramon Gurillo by Katie Harnett

In this blog I’m going to kill two fashionable birds with one stone. Mainly because they were designers I’ve never heard of before and also because I didn’t go too crazy for them.

Over in Victoria House I bumped into ex intern Sarah Barnes at Ramon Gurillo: turns out that she’s interning now with Fashion156 (who you will remember that I met in the front row over at Charlie Le Mindu), here small world that it is. Apparently they’ve got money from the Fashion Council over yonder so it’s all straight reportage, page as quick as possible. NOT SO HERE FOLKS. You’ll hear my views exactly as they are, undiluted – some of the time – even by good common sense. And complete with rambling interludes aplenty. That’s just how we roll I’m afraid. Ain’t no one giving us money.

Ramon Gurillo by Katie Harnett
Ramon Gurillo by Katie Harnett

Ramon was all about the yarn and I found myself wondering (not for the first time it has to be said) if, finally, knitwear has come of age. Maybe I should resurrect my knitwear business after all. Yes, I designed a range of 80s influenced handknits made from mohair and vegetable dyed British rare sheep wool at about the same time as I launched Amelia’s Magazine, fact fans. It was called avb (a nickname from my parents). But I just couldn’t do both. Madness it was. In fact big bags of unused wool are at this very moment languishing in my parent’s attic, no doubt being decimated by moths as we speak.

Ramon had some very sexy metallic glittery lips but I’m afraid the same glamourous intent had not been applied to his collection – which was far too tasteful for me. I did very much like the bold concertina (metallic, again) necklaces. Sorry, back to the knitwear. There were lots of lacy knit tights and leggings (possibly belonging to the stylist) which I quite liked, although I have to say that at the rate I put holes in my own leggings choosing to buy ones with pre-made holes would seem foolhardy at best. The best piece was a wonderful holey sweater dress, and I liked all the dangly bulbous bits and ruched details that appeared on other items.

Ramon Gurillo by Katie Harnett
Ramon Gurillo by Katie Harnett

After the show Sarah and I went to the tiny press room in the On/Off building, where I proceeded to stylishly tip nuts all over the bottom of my bag and then all over the blow-up sofa whilst Sarah attempted to upload a hasty blog. When she failed to make an internet connection we headed off to the Bodyamr show over at the gorgeous Freemasons’ Hall. We were herded into yet another staggeringly beautiful hall – featuring heavily ornate ceilings and shuttered wooden divisions between two antechambers. I sat tapping my feet and wondering how likely it was that I would make it to the next show (Bora Aksu), as rumours began to circulate on twitter that Nicola Roberts of Girls Aloud was in the front row. Well, not where I was she weren’t, but she could have been the other side of the division. Dammit. I do find it ever so amusing that Nicola, once the most pitied and derided member of the band, is now the coolest fashionista of the lot. Oh how those tangerine days of yore must haunt her now!

Bodyamr by Saroj Patel
Bodyamr by Saroj Patel

In the end I decided to lurk at the back so I could make a hasty exit, and only got to see the first few looks of the Bodyamr collection. Usually enough to make a thorough and precise analysis of a show I find. The show was opened by a model of staggering non-beauty and I registered with amusement a few confused smirks in the front row opposite me. A very odd choice indeed. It was then straight into “sports luxe” of the type we’ve seen many times before. Looking back at the catwalk pictures of the outfits I missed my favourites were definitely the ruche print dresses. But then you can always win me over with a bit of splashy coloured print.

Fortunately I managed to make it over to Bora Aksu in time….

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3 Responses to “London Fashion Week A/W 2010 Catwalk Review: Ramon Gurillo and Bodyamr”

  1. Guy Hipwell says:

    Hello hope you are getting through LFW ok. Not sure who mentioned money from the BFC, sadly this is not the case, but they are supporting F156 by providing space for us to showcase and lnks on their site. For this we are grateful. All this happened because we shoot lots of the emerging designers in our editorials. The newer names that no one has heard much about.

  2. Naadia Kidy says:

    Just to let you know, the fab accessories at this show are from Kapow Wow!
    http://www.kapowwowobjects.com

  3. SEC says:

    How can something be ‘too tasteful’?!

    I thought this collection was stunning! His technique for knit is outstanding. In a sophisticated manner there were some very sexy looks in his eveningwear, what did you think of his fringed skirts?

    Casual looks were wearable and cute too, very real.

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