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Top 25 Art Blog - Creative Tourist

London Fashion Week A/W 2010 Catwalk Review: Welsh Designer Collective

A handpicked selection of the finest talent to come out of Wales since Charlotte Church, in the form of designers Josie Beckett, Elinor Franklin and Emma Griffiths. My Beautiful Fashion, Sunday 21 February

Written by Matt Bramford

The Welsh Designer Collective is a handpicked selection of Wales’ emerging fashion design talent. The Welsh are GOOD. Who knew?

They certainly know how to plug Wales, for starters. I hope everybody noticed even the seats had been given the Welsh treatment – covered in fabulous geometric fabric by Melin Tregwynt.

The goodie bags contained Welsh cakes, Welsh socks, Welsh whiskey and Welsh spring water. Alright, we get it! They’d really missed a trick with the ambient music – a Sir Tom or Dame Shirley track would have been far more appropriate, considering.

Onto the show, where Josie Beckett’s collection appeared first. Models sported hair that was a hybrid of Bride of Frankenstein and soft, cloud-like forms. Some great stuff here, influenced by the Tudors. Puffed shoulders, typical of the era, were given a modern flavour – taking the fashions of the Elizabethan upper-classes and making them wearable and dynamic.

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Fabulously illustrated by June Chanpoomidole

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Hem-lines were very high indeed, not particularly appropriate for Queen Liz I but very, very now. The collection was relatively simple, but extremely effective, and also included prints of infamous faces from the Tudor period. I loved the Henry VIII tee. Make one for the boys please, Josie.

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Elinor Franklin’s collection was sports-lux meets disco-glam, making great use of the aesthetics of leather and silk. These materials were juxtaposed across tops and skirts, developing into bolder winged forms, shaped like graduation gowns.

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Both silk and leather were panelled into the same garments, and creases, twists and knots flattered the female form. An Elinor Franklin woman is confident and downright sexy.

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Fabulously illustrated by June Chanpoomidole

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Emma Griffiths also made great use of materials, contrasting the aesthetic properties of varying forms. Totally body-concious, the models were literally wrapped in leather and PVC.

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Fabulously illustrated by June Chanpoomidole

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Patches of PVC were applied to yet more body-con dresses to echo the female form, and were pretty futuristic. Playful gemoetric jackets were structured and left little to the imagination. I loved Griffiths’ black and nude colour palette, which oozed sophistication.

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Cymru Am Byth!

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