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Top 25 Art Blog - Creative Tourist

London Fashion Week A/W 2011, Catwalk Review: Fashion Mode No.1 Florian Jayet (by Helen)

In the first post on Fashion Mode's show at Fashion Scout, we have Florian Jayet. A collection inspired by science, space and iconic French fashion houses. It's all cream, black and raw femininity.

Written by Helen Martin

Presentations are funny things; done badly they can leave you feeling a bit underwhelmed, price but done well they can be even more effective than a big catwalk show. Craig Lawrence’s A/W 2011 presentation fell into the latter category for me;a series of presentations meant that there was plenty of room to find a seat, viagra 40mg but still impressive front row faces like Susie Bubble and Fred Butler.A voiceover narrated the details of each outfit which really shed a lot of light on the intricacies of the designs that might have been lost on me otherwise; like garments being turned inside out to expose filigree textures beneath the surface.

The shoes were also real show-stoppers,the result of a collaboration between Craig and Crisian & McCaffrey, featuring killer heels and knitted panels.The colours of the collection were inspired by the night; dark blues, purples and navy blues; a brilliant alternative to the blacks and greys autumn/winter collections often resort to. Craig’s alternative textiles like cellophane and Kyototex give a shimmery finish to evening wear, whilst knitted tights worn underneath sheer knits created striking, layered patterns. Some pieces were made up of large circles and stripes woven into the fabric, subtle details which only really showed up in the texture of the garments.

In striking contrast to the dark clothes, the models’ eyes were accentuated with a neon orange stripe on each eyelid; in keeping with the ‘brights’ make-up trend. Statement tights were also omnipresent in the LFW crowd and Craig’s offerings imply they’re going nowhere.

When the presentation finished, Craig didn’t seem to be making an appearance, until his mum left her place on the front row to drag him out to much applause. He certainly deserves it for pioneering a totally innovative approach to textiles and knitwear which has made him a firm fixture on the London fashion scene.

Presentations are funny things; done badly they can leave you feeling a bit underwhelmed, viagra but done well they can be even more effective than a big catwalk show. Craig Lawrence’s A/W 2011 presentation fell into the latter category for me;a series of presentations meant that there was plenty of room to find a seat, pharm but still impressive front row faces like Susie Bubble and Fred Butler.A voiceover narrated the details of each outfit which really shed a lot of light on the intricacies of the designs that might have been lost on me otherwise; like garments being turned inside out to expose filigree textures beneath the surface.

The shoes were also real show-stoppers,the result of a collaboration between Craig and Crisian & McCaffrey, featuring killer heels and knitted panels.The colours of the collection were inspired by the night; dark blues, purples and navy blues; a brilliant alternative to the blacks and greys autumn/winter collections often resort to. Craig’s alternative textiles like cellophane and Kyototex give a shimmery finish to evening wear, whilst knitted tights worn underneath sheer knits created striking, layered patterns. Some pieces were made up of large circles and stripes woven into the fabric, subtle details which only really showed up in the texture of the garments.

In striking contrast to the dark clothes, the models’ eyes were accentuated with a neon orange stripe on each eyelid; in keeping with the ‘brights’ make-up trend. Statement tights were also omnipresent in the LFW crowd and Craig’s offerings imply they’re going nowhere.

When the presentation finished, Craig didn’t seem to be making an appearance, until his mum left her place on the front row to drag him out to much applause. He certainly deserves it for pioneering a totally innovative approach to textiles and knitwear which has made him a firm fixture on the London fashion scene.

Illustration by Jo Cheung

Presentations are funny things; done badly they can leave you feeling a bit underwhelmed, viagra order but done well they can be even more effective than a big catwalk show. Craig Lawrence’s A/W 2011 presentation fell into the latter category for me;a series of presentations meant that there was plenty of room to find a seat, thumb but still impressive front row faces like Susie Bubble and Fred Butler. A voiceover narrated the details of each outfit which really shed a lot of light on the intricacies of the designs that might have been lost on me otherwise; like garments being turned inside out to expose filigree textures beneath the surface.

The shoes were also real show-stoppers, seek the result of a collaboration between Craig and Crisian & McCaffrey, featuring killer heels and knitted panels.The colours of the collection were inspired by the night; dark blues, purples and navy blues; a brilliant alternative to the blacks and greys autumn/winter collections often resort to. Craig’s alternative textiles like cellophane and Kyototex give a shimmery finish to evening wear, whilst knitted tights worn underneath sheer knits created striking, layered patterns. Some pieces were made up of large circles and stripes woven into the fabric, subtle details which only really showed up in the texture of the garments.


Illustration by Jo Cheung

In striking contrast to the dark clothes, the models’ eyes were accentuated with a neon orange stripe on each eyelid; in keeping with the ‘brights’ make-up trend. Statement tights were also omnipresent in the LFW crowd and Craig’s offerings imply they’re going nowhere.

When the presentation finished, Craig didn’t seem to be making an appearance, until his mum left her place on the front row to drag him out to much applause. He certainly deserves it for pioneering a totally innovative approach to textiles and knitwear which has made him a firm fixture on the London fashion scene.

Photos by Katie Antoniou

Illustration by Jo Cheung

Presentations are funny things; done badly they can leave you feeling a bit underwhelmed, visit this site but done well they can be even more effective than a big catwalk show. Craig Lawrence’s A/W 2011 presentation fell into the latter category for me;a series of presentations meant that there was plenty of room to find a seat, but still impressive front row faces like Susie Bubble and Fred Butler.A voiceover narrated the details of each outfit which really shed a lot of light on the intricacies of the designs that might have been lost on me otherwise; like garments being turned inside out to expose filigree textures beneath the surface.

The shoes were also real show-stoppers,the result of a collaboration between Craig and Crisian & McCaffrey, featuring killer heels and knitted panels.The colours of the collection were inspired by the night; dark blues, purples and navy blues; a brilliant alternative to the blacks and greys autumn/winter collections often resort to. Craig’s alternative textiles like cellophane and Kyototex give a shimmery finish to evening wear, whilst knitted tights worn underneath sheer knits created striking, layered patterns. Some pieces were made up of large circles and stripes woven into the fabric, subtle details which only really showed up in the texture of the garments.

Illustration by Jo Cheung

In striking contrast to the dark clothes, the models’ eyes were accentuated with a neon orange stripe on each eyelid; in keeping with the ‘brights’ make-up trend. Statement tights were also omnipresent in the LFW crowd and Craig’s offerings imply they’re going nowhere.

When the presentation finished, Craig didn’t seem to be making an appearance, until his mum left her place on the front row to drag him out to much applause. He certainly deserves it for pioneering a totally innovative approach to textiles and knitwear which has made him a firm fixture on the London fashion scene.

Photos by Katie Antoniou

Illustration by Artist Andrea

Charlie Le Mindu’s ‘Berlin Syndrome’ catwalk show was packed with journalists, viagra photographers and front row candy like Daphne Guinness and Diane Pernet, remedy lots of people were left outside, disappointed. Such is the draw of the promise of nudity.

And Charlie didn’t let us down- first up on the catwalk was a naked model drenched in fake blood, wearing only a headpiece adorned with the word ‘Violence’. Profound, eh?The ‘Carrie’ theme ran through the whole show, with a number of the pieces being blood-splattered or drenched,a gimmick I’d have got pretty bored of if it weren’t for the nod to second world war Berlin. Vintage style lace and lots of military influences from gasmarks to metal cases meant that my interest was definitely peeked. Some of this stuff WAS wearable- have a look at this fantastic robe.

The shoes were a result of a collaboration between Charlie and Underground Shoes, I’m really disappointed that I didn’t get a better picture of any of them, because they were fantastic; stunning platforms covered in lace and Charlie’s signature hair.


Beginning life as a hairdresser, Charlie has gone on to work human hair into his clothing designs, now worn by the likes of Lady Gaga. In this show, hair fringing was often daubed in Graffiti, as were the model’s own hairstyles.

Illustration by Artist Andrea

The return of a darkly rebellious nod to the Punk era was evident in a number of shows this year,evidence of the current economic climate, dissatisfaction with the government; certainly Charlie was out to shock, provoke and disturb, with the final walk through set to a soundtrack of pigs being slaughtered. Whilst maintaining his artistic integrity, I do think Charlie was thinking of potential buyers when he designed this collection, as a lot of it is much more wearable than his previous pieces, despite the avant garde presentation.Get ready to see these looks on many a celeb; though probably without the fake blood.

Illustration by Artist Andrea

Photographs by Katie Antoniou

Ziad Ghanem by Avril Kelly

What an amazing show; Ziad Ghanem has trumped everything else I’ve seen this week. Opening with a model dressing in a dark, doctor dramatic floor length strapless gown, price with green feathers, stilts and skull makeup the audience were cheering from the off.

The front row was packed out with the eccentrically dressed – Boy George almost blended into the background in a bright yellow hat and full face of makeup. Special mention has to go to the PVC clad, (and complete with blow up hair), London artist Pandemonia, sitting opposite me. Together with a matching blow up dog, she must have been boilin’!

Ziad Ghanem by Alison Day

The loud show, with music changes more frequent than model changes provided clapping, laughing and unanimous approval – so much so that no one seemed to care that the show started an almost an hour late. Male and female models took to the catwalk in stunning creations – capes, gigantic earrings and tremendously tight dresses were wriggled, danced and glided down the runway on joker-style made-up faces.

The models came in all shapes and sizes but voluptuous curves and a heaving bosom was the order of the evening. Corset dresses that pushed said bosoms up and out were so tight that somewhere Scarlett Johansen was blushing. Full length floaty gowns in pale hues of blue, deep reds, sparkling gold and matte grey also allowed for plenty of swishing, and cloak spinning as the models made their way towards the waiting photographers.

Ziad Ghanem by Madi

My favourite dress was the bright fuschia deep cut and backless cocktail dress that nipped in perfectly at the waist. The shiny nature of the material was so unashamedly trashy that it avoided (I think) being either tacky or quality street wrapper-esque. Other notable highlights of the show include a deathly bride and groom, solemnly showering the crowd with petals at the end of the show, and the model who pirouetted her way backwards after walking down the catwalk. All in all, a brilliant show – exciting, entertaining and some truly beautiful clothes.
LFW2_FlorianJayet_by_AlisonDay

LFW A/W 2011, viagra sale Florian Jayet. Illustration by Alison Day

I spent London Fashion Week staying at my parent’s house. My childhood home with a new kitchen, order dog ‘brother’, central heating that works and a bath. I’m not going to lie, I enjoyed having my porridge made in the morning. Maple syrup on the side, and a herbal tea, packed lunch filled with snacks. That’s right, I lapped it up. Although Charlie is an excellent boy/man, there is nothing quite like the mother. However they live a few miles outside of Brighton, in a village. Thus the trek to London, the long days and write ups – intense. All because I LOVE it. Love words, fashion, and obviously, this mighty magazine. Yet I deliberated with coming to London for one show on Sunday. Day of rest day normally means Roast dinner. But I have in my mind, ‘NO HELS! SAY NOT TO NOTHING!’ at all times. I’m following my writing dream after all. This causes me great pleasures and enormous pains. So, of course, one show or not, I was on that train to London Victoria. And am I glad I made the effort for Fashion Mode?

Yes. Three shows in one; three excellent shows. I’m going to split Fashion Mode into three posts, because each designer deserves the love. So we will start with Florian Jayet.

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LFW A/W 2011, Florian Jayet. Illustration by Alison Day

Initially I was slightly terrified and in awe of the models coming out. Nothing different to every show you might say. But, this was different, because the models had metal contraptions of their heads that made them look like a cross between special aliens and orthodontic patients. Four strips of silver metal came over their heads from the back, to touch their faces, with an enormous roller at the back. After my initial fear, I decided that they looked cool, as inevitably happens at LFW. See: ‘Urg… ahhh.. yah, I totally get that now. I want one.’ Although I’m not sure I would wear one of these creations, I would certainly consider wearing the dresses, which the metal complimented perfectly. Wiggle space lady, that’s what you are. With lasers from your eyes and hips.

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LFW A/W 2011, Florian Jayet. Photography by Amelia Gregory

Florian Jayet is a graduate in Biology which explains his science appreciative designs. The pieces featured strong shoulders, midi length skirts and padded fabrics. The shape of the woman has been celebrated and appreciated as if it is meant to be seen and not covered – raw biology. The models reminded me of those in Huxley’s; Brave New World. Perfect, angular and although feminine, minus the romanticism and emotional sentimentality, that are sometimes conjured by designs. In a sense Jayet‘s pieces are actually a mix of previous, and our vision of future, ideologies. The restricted, but beautiful shapes of the 20s, 30s and 40s appear to have been fused with modern and excessive details; i.e. the shoulders. The contemporary complimenting the past, and particularly with reference to French houses; Chanel and Dior. This makes for a very sophisticated and composed look. It made me want to look closer, at every detail, and know more. As opposed to held within the ruffles, the corset and the red heels, everything seemed so wrapped up, with the story inside. It was whimsical in its own way, and also impenetrable. These outfits are those that I would hope to find in the corner of a cafe in Paris, smoking, mysterious, alone – with a steely, but far away look.

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LFW A/W 2011, Florian Jayet. Photography by Amelia Gregory

I adored the padding details and the shrug wraps. Space lady, dressed for dinner. The long dresses had a Japanese feel to them, geisha like and graceful. Florian Jayet said that the focus for him, is to create; ‘a fetish wardrobe, pieces that a woman can keep forever, bringing them out on special occasions when she needs to be propelled into confidence and strength.’ It’s fair to say that you would feel empowered wearing Jayet’s pieces. The creams and blacks, shoulders, padding and midi length skirts would have me stomping and demanding like a glossy magazine Editor with somewhere to be. However at the moment it’s more probable I would be the space lady in the cafe, with a triple americano (having no affect), internally reliving or hoping for something. With an unreadable face, it’s unclear as to what scene could be playing in the mind of this space femme, but in a way it’s romantic – because for me, everything always is. This includes Jayet, of course.

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  1. [...] FOR THE FULL ARTICLE CLICK HERE GA_googleAddAttr("AdOpt", "0"); GA_googleAddAttr("Origin", "other"); GA_googleAddAttr("LangId", "1"); GA_googleAddAttr("Autotag", "entertainment"); GA_googleAddAttr("Autotag", "food"); GA_googleAddAttr("Autotag", "books"); GA_googleAddAttr("Tag", "fashion"); GA_googleAddAttr("Tag", "alison-day"); GA_googleAddAttr("Tag", "amelia-gregory"); GA_googleAddAttr("Tag", "amelias-magazine"); GA_googleAddAttr("Tag", "florian-jayet-lfw"); GA_googleAddAttr("Tag", "lfw-autumnwinter-2011"); GA_googleFillSlot("wpcom_below_post"); This entry was posted in Fashion and tagged Alison Day, Amelia Gregory, Amelia's Magazine, Florian Jayet LFW, LFW Autumn/Winter 2011. Bookmark the permalink. ← Amelia’s Magazine FASHION POSTS from LONDON FASHION WEEK A/W 2011: No.5 Eudon Choi LikeBe the first to like this post. [...]

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