Listings

    No events to show

Follow

Twitter

|

Facebook

|

MySpace

|

Last.fm

RSS

Subscribe

Top 25 Art Blog - Creative Tourist

London Fashion Week A/W 2011 Catwalk Review: Jasper Conran sketched by Jenny

A belated but unique sketch blog of the Jasper Conran catwalk show at BFC Showspace on Sunday 20th February 2011. Featuring many sixties inspired panels and unnecessary bucket hats.

Written by Jenny Robins

mamuthones artwork
mamuthones artwork

Having extensively researched the subject (well, purchase googled it) I’ve been able to establish that Mamuthones are pre-Christian masquerades dating back 2,000 years from Sardinia. As a musical project, Italy’s Mamuthones are no less mysterious, seeming as they do to tap into the same strand of unnerving mysticism as this ancient ritual. One thing is for sure though – any album that gives a credit in the sleeve notes for “screams and whispers” is worth a spin. Can things get any weirder? Of course they can! Further inspection of the sleeve notes reveals that one of the seven tracks, MJ74 was recorded in 1974. But wait, this is a debut album! What the bejesus is going on?

As it turns out, Mamuthones is the solo project of Alessio Gastaldello, founder of Italian psych pop mavericks Jennifer Gentle. Here he teams up with former bandmate Marco Fasolo on guitar and… 62 year old drummer Maurizio Boldrin, which is where MJ74 comes in. Boldrin actually recorded this track of monk-style chanting and cymbal chimes back in the 70s, and it’s testimony to the sheer otherwordly nature of Mamuthones’ vision that this happily sits side by side with a bunch of tracks recorded last Spring.

The Mamuthones by Ankolie
Illustration by Ankolie

So what exactly is Mamuthones’ vision? Well, be afraid, be very afraid – it takes all of the psych and none of the pop of Jennifer Gentle to create a truly foreboding mixture, where Boldrin’s pounding tribal drumbeats collide with monumental keyboard drones and, of course, whispers and screams. Tracks like Ota Benga recall the weirder end of the Syd Barrett-era Pink Floyd cannon, while A New Start could be from an (admittedly brilliantly produced) transcendental meditation CD.

So you could say something for everyone then? Well yes, if everyone has just woken up from an acid trip in rural Sardinia. But seriously, if you like your music weird and wonderful (and with a bit of ritualistic chanting – let’s face it, who doesn’t?) then you’ll love this. If you like your music safe and cosy, then watch out – you’re about to be terrified.

Mamuthones is out now on Boring Machines.

mamuthones artwork

Having extensively researched the subject (well, cost googled it) I’ve been able to establish that Mamuthones are pre-Christian masquerades dating back 2,000 years from Sardinia. As a musical project, Italy’s Mamuthones are no less mysterious, seeming as they do to tap into the same strand of unnerving mysticism as this ancient ritual. One thing is for sure though – any album that gives a credit in the sleeve notes for “screams and whispers” is worth a spin. Can things get any weirder? Of course they can! Further inspection of the sleeve notes reveals that one of the seven tracks, MJ74 was recorded in 1974. But wait, this is a debut album! What the bejesus is going on?

As it turns out, Mamuthones is the solo project of Alessio Gastaldello, founder of Italian psych pop mavericks Jennifer Gentle. Here he teams up with former bandmate Marco Fasolo on guitar and… 62 year old drummer Maurizio Boldrin, which is where MJ74 comes in. Boldrin actually recorded this track of monk-style chanting and cymbal chimes back in the 70s, and it’s testimony to the sheer otherwordly nature of Mamuthones’ vision that this happily sits side by side with a bunch of tracks recorded last Spring.

The Mamuthones by Ankolie
Illustration by Ankolie

So what exactly is Mamuthones’ vision? Well, be afraid, be very afraid – it takes all of the psych and none of the pop of Jennifer Gentle to create a truly foreboding mixture, where Boldrin’s pounding tribal drumbeats collide with monumental keyboard drones and, of course, whispers and screams. Tracks like Ota Benga recall the weirder end of the Syd Barrett-era Pink Floyd cannon, while A New Start could be from an (admittedly brilliantly produced) transcendental meditation CD.

So you could say something for everyone then? Well yes, if everyone has just woken up from an acid trip in rural Sardinia. But seriously, if you like your music weird and wonderful (and with a bit of ritualistic chanting – let’s face it, who doesn’t?) then you’ll love this. If you like your music safe and cosy, then watch out – you’re about to be terrified.

Mamuthones is out now on Boring Machines.

jasper conran by jenny robins
All illustrations by Jenny Robins.

The man behind me in the queue to get into the Jasper Conran show was talking about buying a house in London Fields. Well bully for him as I had a seated ticket and skipped right past him when we got inside the BFC tent.

Jasper Conran A/W 2011 by Jenny Robins
The queue for Jasper Conran A/W 2011 by Jenny Robins.

I hadn’t been in my seat long when by some pre-understood signal everyone moved forward into empty seats at the front. Had I been paying attention I might have been able to see the shoes when the show started, unhealthy but as I was halfway up the side of the runway my sketching time for each outfit was super limited. I wasn’t sure I liked my drawings at the time, for sale but when I came to edit them I realised I kind of love them so now you get to see them.

Jasper Conran A/W 2011 by Jenny RobinsJasper Conran A/W 2011 by Jenny Robinsjasper conran 2 - lfw aw11 - jenny robins
Jasper Conran A/W 2011 by Jenny Robins.

The designs were I suppose ace in all the expected ways – clean lines, sexy perfect little joined panels, lovely wide necklines and sixties inspired shift dresses all in rich dark tones combined with a lot of clean white. There were some fairly ridiculous oversized plant pot hats going on which I wasn’t sure about. The final outfit had a crowd-ooohing stand up feather collar atop a long straight silhouette – classic.

Jasper Conran A/W 2011 by Jenny Robins
Jasper Conran A/W 2011 by Jenny Robins.

Stars of the show for me were the fitted panelled jumpsuits with chunky round buckled belts – very Mrs. Peel. I thought they looked like felt but they may have been suede. Don’t quote me on it.

Jasper Conran A/W 2011 by Jenny Robins
Jasper Conran A/W 2011 by Jenny Robins.

You can see lots more work by Jenny Robins in Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration and you can read Nick Bain’s review of Jasper Conran here

Tags:

, , , , , , , ,

Similar Posts:

Leave a Reply