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Top 25 Art Blog - Creative Tourist

London Fashion Week A/W 2011 Catwalk Review: John Rocha

Gracious little John Rocha did it again with an (almost) all-black array of giant texture, delectable splashes of bright red and head pieces that made me wonder how the models stayed upright!Illustrations by Jaymie O'Callaghan and Mina Bach.

Written by Georgia Takacs

KONICA MINOLTA DIGITAL CAMERA

Illustration by Mina Bach

If I could taste something as delish for the mouth as Elliott J. Frieze is for the eyes, pill I’d eat it up so fast that time may go backwards. It’s my second LFW show of newcomer Elliott J. Frieze and I’m seriously beginning to LOVE this guy. Like, true sartorial love. His work needs to be up there with the best on the BFC Catwalk. NEEDS.

Saying that, however, he did bag a rather delectable venue anyway. Especially for his third London Fashion Week show. It was a bit of an epic walk in the rain down the entire length of the Strand, but for the beautiful Charing Cross Hotel? Well worth it. And with free champagne, who’s complaining? Not me. Well actually, me a bit… I thought ‘Great! Bit of bubbly will numb my stabbing sore throat’ – WRONG. (Note To All – 1 in 2 people at fashion week are ill like moi). After a sneaky chat with someone in the production team, Amelia, Matt and I got first dibs on seats, as well as a lovely lady from Grazia. She lent me a lush pen that had me wishing she’d forget to ask for it back. We spread ourselves amongst the front rows for different perspectives and then it was the hipsters turn to pick-and-choose. It sure felt good to have one-up on them this time! The crowds then gushed in with one lady’s hat towering tall above them all. We couldn’t help staring in the champagne reception, it genuinely looked like a Philip Treacy. Jealous.

Illustration by Kerriann Hulme

The runway for the show was unique in that it snaked around the room, this insanely beautiful ornate room. A gleaming chandelier hung high over our heads, for goodness sake. And velvet and marble was coming in from all directions. So were the clothes as luxe as the location?

Illustration by Natsuki Otani

HELL yes, they were. The collection, once again, embodied his natural design ethos, paying homage to classic British Tailoring intertwined with sexy modernity. I remember this creepy boy from my childhood wore green corduroy trousers to school everyday, so I usually REPELL corduroy. However, Elliott J. Frieze has officially turned me with suitable injections of camel-coloured corduroy – think pencil skirts and jacket details. Lush.

The whole colour pallette was perfection on the eyes. Frieze centred it around a combination of ‘caffeine mixtures’ represented by Latte, Mochas and Expresso. Considering i’m a die-hard lover of anything coffee-flavoured, this must be why i wanted to eat the collection up! Everything was very well co-ordinated.

Frieze drove the boundaries of his classic British foundations with cocktail dresses made from lambswool and a long beautiful dress that was constructed by some of the most impressive jersey draping I have EVER seen. No wonder he’s dressed such power-women as Yasmini Le Bon, Lily Cole & Erin O’ Connor.

The idea is that the look reflects Elliott’s story from Country to City. From all those old-fashioned favourite textures to a bit of spectacular cinching, draping and tucking to prepare the country Lord/Lady for the London ratrace!

Much inspiration was taken from the 1970s. Therefore, just like last season, hair was big, curly and volumnous. Suitable additions of sunglasses courtesy of Persol and gloves by Southcombe set the whole look off, creating a powerful and sexy image.

If I wasn’t currently a student and could afford to invest in any up-and-coming designer, I would go straight to Elliott J. Frieze! He’s my definate one-to-watch so, if I were you, I’d keep an eye on him.

Illustration by Mina Bach

If I could taste something as delish for the mouth as Elliott J. Frieze is for the eyes, more about I’d eat it up so fast that time may go backwards. It’s my second LFW show of newcomer Elliott J. Frieze and I’m seriously beginning to LOVE this guy. Like, pharm true sartorial love. His work needs to be up there with the best on the BFC Catwalk. NEEDS.

Illustration by Matilda Sazio

Saying that, buy more about however, he did bag a rather delectable venue anyway. Especially for his third London Fashion Week show. It was a bit of an epic walk in the rain down the entire length of the Strand, but for the beautiful Charing Cross Hotel? Well worth it. And with free champagne, who’s complaining? Not me. Well actually, me a bit… I thought ‘Great! Bit of bubbly will numb my stabbing sore throat’ – WRONG. (Note To All – 1 in 2 people at fashion week are ill like moi). After a sneaky chat with someone in the production team, Amelia, Matt and I got first dibs on seats, as well as a lovely lady from Grazia. She lent me a lush pen that had me wishing she’d forget to ask for it back. We spread ourselves amongst the front rows for different perspectives and then it was the hipsters turn to pick-and-choose. It sure felt good to have one-up on them this time! The crowds then gushed in with one lady’s hat towering tall above them all. We couldn’t help staring in the champagne reception, it genuinely looked like a Philip Treacy. Jealous.

Illustration by Kerriann Hulme

The runway for the show was unique in that it snaked around the room, this insanely beautiful ornate room. A gleaming chandelier hung high over our heads, for goodness sake. And velvet and marble was coming in from all directions. So were the clothes as luxe as the location?

Illustration by Natsuki Otani

HELL yes, they were. The collection, once again, embodied his natural design ethos, paying homage to classic British Tailoring intertwined with sexy modernity. I remember this creepy boy from my childhood wore green corduroy trousers to school everyday, so I usually REPELL corduroy. However, Elliott J. Frieze has officially turned me with suitable injections of camel-coloured corduroy – think pencil skirts and jacket details. Lush.

The whole colour pallette was perfection on the eyes. Frieze centred it around a combination of ‘caffeine mixtures’ represented by Latte, Mochas and Expresso. Considering i’m a die-hard lover of anything coffee-flavoured, this must be why i wanted to eat the collection up! Everything was very well co-ordinated.

Frieze drove the boundaries of his classic British foundations with cocktail dresses made from lambswool and a long beautiful dress that was constructed by some of the most impressive jersey draping I have EVER seen. No wonder he’s dressed such power-women as Yasmini Le Bon, Lily Cole & Erin O’ Connor.

The idea is that the look reflects Elliott’s story from Country to City. From all those old-fashioned favourite textures to a bit of spectacular cinching, draping and tucking to prepare the country Lord/Lady for the London ratrace!

Much inspiration was taken from the 1970s. Therefore, just like last season, hair was big, curly and volumnous. Suitable additions of sunglasses courtesy of Persol and gloves by Southcombe set the whole look off, creating a powerful and sexy image.

If I wasn’t currently a student and could afford to invest in any up-and-coming designer, I would go straight to Elliott J. Frieze! He’s my definate one-to-watch so, if I were you, I’d keep an eye on him.

Illustration by Gilly Rochester

I have always been a huge fan of Alice Temperley; in fact my whole family has, prostate with both my 19 year old sister and my mother owning pieces by Temperley London. This is testament to the timeless nature of the designs- its a label that seems above trends and fads, healing always unmistakeably Temperley, with the monochrome patterns, flowing silhouettes and oodles of embellishment. Inspired by Venetian fans, this collection had a decidedly Spanish feel, with flared flamenco style skirts and splashes of red.The focus went back to the brand’s roots: eveningwear- with delicate tulle dresses covered with either embroidery or encrusted with crystals.

Illustration by Joana Faria

Illustration by Gemma Milly

The opulence and extravagance reminded me of Marchesa’s latest collection, and dare I say it, even some of the last McQueen pieces. Other dresses were covered in stars, harking back to Alice’s love of the circus evident in earlier collections. A collared dress with 50s style skirts brought a vintage feel to the collection, whilst stunning shoes from Charlotte Olympia kept the whole thing contemporary.

Illustration by Donya Todd

The obligatory chunky knit and even a feminine take on the tux with a ruffled shirt meant that there was actually a huge range within a collection that still managed to maintain one coherent aesthetic. Described as a ‘coming of age’ collection for Temperley, it really does prove Alice to be at the top of her game. There are no gimmicks here- just luxury, feminine, red-carpet worthy looks that your grandchildren will be whipping out as ‘vintage’ in years to come.

Illustration by Joana Faria

Illustration by Gemma Milly

Illustration by Gilly Rochester

Illustration By Artist Andrea

I was very nervous about Jasper’s show, this as I adored his Spring/Summer collection so much that I was worried my expectations would be too high. But I wasn’t disappointed- the sound of rainfall set the mood for the show, search and the slats of the more theatrical pieces replicated this noise as the models walked. One maxi-dress was tied at the waist with a belt hung with oversized keys, which clinked together as she walked. The inclusion of sounds in a catwalk show helps to make it all seem more three dimensional. Reworked, instrumental covers of 90s tunes by the likes of Nirvana also created a great soundtrack.


Whilst a number of the dresses were so ostentatious- and according to reports from friends of mine backstage, so incredibly heavy-that they are unlikely to be worn by the likes of you and me, Jasper cleverly takes the textures of these pieces and works them into accessories like clutch bags and statement ruff-style necklaces that are much easier to integrate into your real-life wardrobe.

Illustration by Artist Andrea

Inspired by the novel ‘Soie’ by Alessandro Baricco about a European man who becomes enchanted with the East, there is a distinct oriental feel to the colour palette and the silhouettes.Lace dresses with thigh-high slits and completely backless, full length evening gowns added to the sensuality of the silk and lace.

Iconic Fornasetti-inspired prints make fantastic statement pieces, as well as a knitted maxi number, the knitwear trend instigated by the likes of Craig Lawrence and Mark Fast showing no sign of dying.The hair was elegantly side-swept in a vintage-inspired up-do; a look complimented by Lucas Jack drop earrings.


Its no coincidence that my favourite shows on Friday, and so far of LFW altogether, are the two that featured lots of colour, a few show-stopping, theatrical pieces, gorgeous vintage-inspired prints, and silhouettes designed for a womanly shape.I’m referring to Prophetik and Jasper Garvida. However, both shows also share the same single criticism from me- these are sexy designs, can you please put them on women with sexier figures?They would look BETTER.Honest.The corsets of Prophetik were desperate for some heaving bosoms a la costume drama, whilst some of Jasper’s models were painfully thin.Its something I noticed at his last show too, and I’ve heard the same feedback from a number of people, even the illustrators I sent my photos to were shocked.Jasper is represented by one of the loveliest, most down-to-earth PR companies around, so I really hope they pass thes comments on to him, as its really the only criticism I have of the show.


Illustration By Artist Andrea

I was very nervous about Jasper’s show, more about as I adored his Spring/Summer collection so much that I was worried my expectations would be too high. But I wasn’t disappointed- the sound of rainfall set the mood for the show, troche and the slats of the more theatrical pieces replicated this noise as the models walked. One maxi-dress was tied at the waist with a belt hung with oversized keys, which clinked together as she walked. The inclusion of sounds in a catwalk show helps to make it all seem more three dimensional. Reworked, instrumental covers of 90s tunes by the likes of Nirvana also created a great soundtrack.

Whilst a number of the dresses were so ostentatious – and according to reports from friends of mine backstage, so incredibly heavy – that they are unlikely to be worn by the likes of you and me, Jasper cleverly takes the textures of these pieces and works them into accessories like clutch bags and statement ruff-style necklaces that are much easier to integrate into your real-life wardrobe.


Illustration by Artist Andrea.

Inspired by the novel ‘Soie’ by Alessandro Baricco about a European man who becomes enchanted with the East, there is a distinct oriental feel to the colour palette and the silhouettes.Lace dresses with thigh-high slits and completely backless, full length evening gowns added to the sensuality of the silk and lace.

Iconic Fornasetti-inspired prints make fantastic statement pieces, as well as a knitted maxi number, the knitwear trend instigated by the likes of Craig Lawrence and Mark Fast showing no sign of dying. The hair was elegantly side-swept in a vintage-inspired up-do; a look complimented by Lucas Jack drop earrings.

It’s no coincidence that my favourite shows on Friday, and so far of LFW altogether, are the two that featured lots of colour, a few show-stopping, theatrical pieces, gorgeous vintage-inspired prints, and silhouettes designed for a womanly shape.I’m referring to Prophetik and Jasper Garvida. However, both shows also share the same single criticism from me – these are sexy designs, can you please put them on women with sexier figures? They would look BETTER. Honest. The corsets of Prophetik were desperate for some heaving bosoms a la costume drama, whilst some of Jasper’s models were painfully thin. It’s something I noticed at his last show too, and I’ve heard the same feedback from a number of people, even the illustrators I sent my photos to were shocked. Jasper is represented by one of the loveliest, most down-to-earth PR companies around, so I really hope they pass thes comments on to him, as its really the only criticism I have of the show.

All photography by Katie Antoniou.

Illustrations by Ankolie

Even the invitation to this show had me excited; detail of a vintage toile print on a fabric corset lined with vintage style brass buttons and the byline ‘inspired by the court of Louis XV when art became frivolous’ grabbed my attention.Because all of this is frivolous, diagnosis isn’t it?We’re in the middle of a recession and yet here we are, medical still feeding are obsession with fashion and art because it has become such an integral part of our lives.Combining fashion and music is a big part of my job as a stylist to musicians, find so opening the show with Analize Ching on the violin was a big hit with me, followed by wonderful orchestral music that evoked the atmosphere of a French royal court.


I’d been a little underwhelmed by a lot of very drab Autumn/Winter collections, where hues vary only from black,to greys, some cream and back to black. The colours Prophetik used are all natural, with plum shades blended from madder root, rumex, logwood and indigo, and burgundy mixed from madder root, curled dock and gallnut. Adding yet more splashes of colour and prints were the quilted pieces, handed down from Jeff’s grandmother Lola from Tennesse. Hemp, cactus silk and ostrich feathers provided stunning texture and shape to the pieces. Accessories label ‘Dotted Loop’ provided reworked vintage accessories and even the shoes were made from vegetable-tanned leather.


Its rare that I can get at all excited by menswear, but the pieces in this collection spoke to the avid period-drama fan inside me. Military inspired jackets and riding boots?Phwoar.Yes please. Jeff himself appeared at the end showing how the look can be worked, though I’m sure he could probably get a way with wearing pretty much anything and still look like he just finished writing poetry/surfing/horse-riding; all listed as his hobbies.Only someone this comfortable with his masculinity could design coats for men made out of pastel pink quilts.


Corsets, tailored jackets and voluminous skirts; Jeff is very good at designing clothes for real women’s bodies.He recently dressed the lovely Livia Firth for the 2011 Golden Globes, and I can only imagine that his celebrity following will continue to increase.The final dress, ‘Mrs Moulton’ features ostrich feathers that shed naturally twice a year (from the ostrich, not the dress-that would be a high maintenance frock indeed) hand sewn on white silk and organza- I can totally picture this as a celebrity wedding dress.Watch this space.


I’ll leave you with Jeff’s take on Renaissance Art.I think it’s very interesting considering our current pre-occupation with all things vintage.
‘Renaissance art is not a rebirth as one implies, but freedom from the past. Unconcerned with what has been said or done, living in the present with an immediate relation to all things…achievement does not birth beauty but raw effort confessing its own failures and in the confession is the beauty of Art.’


Illustration by Mina Bach

If I could taste something as delish for the mouth as Elliott J. Frieze is for the eyes, stomach I’d eat it up so fast that time may go backwards. It’s my second LFW show of newcomer Elliott J. Frieze and I’m seriously beginning to LOVE this guy. Like, true sartorial love. His work needs to be up there with the best on the BFC Catwalk. NEEDS.

Illustration by Matilda Sazio

Saying that, however, he did bag a rather delectable venue anyway. Especially for his third London Fashion Week show. It was a bit of an epic walk in the rain down the entire length of the Strand, but for the beautiful Charing Cross Hotel? Well worth it. And with free champagne, who’s complaining? Not me. Well actually, me a bit… I thought ‘Great! Bit of bubbly will numb my stabbing sore throat’ – WRONG. (Note To All – 1 in 2 people at fashion week are ill like moi). After a sneaky chat with someone in the production team, Amelia, Matt and I got first dibs on seats, as well as a lovely lady from Grazia. She lent me a lush pen that had me wishing she’d forget to ask for it back. We spread ourselves amongst the front rows for different perspectives and then it was the hipsters turn to pick-and-choose. It sure felt good to have one-up on them this time! The crowds then gushed in with one lady’s hat towering tall above them all. We couldn’t help staring in the champagne reception, it genuinely looked like a Philip Treacy. Jealous.

Illustration by Kerriann Hulme

The runway for the show was unique in that it snaked around the room, this insanely beautiful ornate room. A gleaming chandelier hung high over our heads, for goodness sake. And velvet and marble was coming in from all directions. So were the clothes as luxe as the location?

Illustration by Natsuki Otani

HELL yes, they were. The collection, once again, embodied his natural design ethos, paying homage to classic British Tailoring intertwined with sexy modernity. I remember this creepy boy from my childhood wore green corduroy trousers to school everyday, so I usually REPELL corduroy. However, Elliott J. Frieze has officially turned me with suitable injections of camel-coloured corduroy – think pencil skirts and jacket details. Lush.

The whole colour pallette was perfection on the eyes. Frieze centred it around a combination of ‘caffeine mixtures’ represented by Latte, Mochas and Expresso. Considering i’m a die-hard lover of anything coffee-flavoured, this must be why i wanted to eat the collection up! Everything was very well co-ordinated.

Frieze drove the boundaries of his classic British foundations with cocktail dresses made from lambswool and a long beautiful dress that was constructed by some of the most impressive jersey draping I have EVER seen. No wonder he’s dressed such power-women as Yasmini Le Bon, Lily Cole & Erin O’ Connor.

The idea is that the look reflects Elliott’s story from Country to City. From all those old-fashioned favourite textures to a bit of spectacular cinching, draping and tucking to prepare the country Lord/Lady for the London ratrace!

Much inspiration was taken from the 1970s. Therefore, just like last season, hair was big, curly and volumnous. Suitable additions of sunglasses courtesy of Persol and gloves by Southcombe set the whole look off, creating a powerful and sexy image.

If I wasn’t currently a student and could afford to invest in any up-and-coming designer, I would go straight to Elliott J. Frieze! He’s my definate one-to-watch so, if I were you, I’d keep an eye on him.

Photos by Georgia Takacs

Illustration by Gilly Rochester

I have always been a huge fan of Alice Temperley; in fact my whole family has, visit this with both my 19 year old sister and my mother owning pieces by Temperley London. This is testament to the timeless nature of the designs- its a label that seems above trends and fads, side effects always unmistakeably Temperley, visit this site with the monochrome patterns, flowing silhouettes and oodles of embellishment. Inspired by Venetian fans, this collection had a decidedly Spanish feel, with flared flamenco style skirts and splashes of red.The focus went back to the brand’s roots: eveningwear- with delicate tulle dresses covered with either embroidery or encrusted with crystals.

Illustration by Joana Faria

Illustration by Gemma Milly

The opulence and extravagance reminded me of Marchesa’s latest collection, and dare I say it, even some of the last McQueen pieces. Other dresses were covered in stars, harking back to Alice’s love of the circus evident in earlier collections. A collared dress with 50s style skirts brought a vintage feel to the collection, whilst stunning shoes from Charlotte Olympia kept the whole thing contemporary.

Illustration by Donya Todd

The obligatory chunky knit and even a feminine take on the tux with a ruffled shirt meant that there was actually a huge range within a collection that still managed to maintain one coherent aesthetic. Described as a ‘coming of age’ collection for Temperley, it really does prove Alice to be at the top of her game. There are no gimmicks here- just luxury, feminine, red-carpet worthy looks that your grandchildren will be whipping out as ‘vintage’ in years to come.

Photos by Katie Antoniou

Illustration by Joana Faria

Illustration by Gemma Milly

Illustration by Gilly Rochester

Illustration by Jaymie O’ Callaghan

He’s the long-standing fashion designer that, information pills despite his teeny tiny height, find you could spot a mile away. Much like his clothes, visit web really. A spot-on show with a dark soundtrack, breath-taking texture and an etheral beauty about the whole thing. This was John Rocha A/W 2011…

The queues to clamber into the BFC catwalk space were pretty epic. It was more of a crowd than a queue! Upon taking my seat, I began to regret wearing layers due to sauna temperatures and not enough space around me to take off my leather jacket. People were literally using the programs as fans to cool themselves. REALLY. Not so glamorous. THE Blogging Power-Couple, Scott Schuman and Garance Dore, sat themselves on the front row along with Susie Bubble (of course) and Alexandra Schulman, Editor of Vogue UK. And then came Hilary Alexander in her signature fur hat (*growl*) who sat RIGHT there in front of me – oh the excitement. She had a good look around her, peering over the top of her glasses as she does, exchanged a few words with fellow Times writers and then sat quietly waiting for showtime.

Illustration by Mina Bach

And here we go! Alas, after spotting Neil Young’s Harvest Moon as John Rocha’s inspiration on the program I was half expecting Old Man on the playlist. Ah well. Instead some heavy dark beats a la Stone Roses boomed across the catwalk as the first model took to the runway, in black black black and a MASSIVE head piece. Most models were baring these great creations that looked like a jamaican man’s dreadlocks tied up in a heap with wool knitted into it and a ton of volumising hairspray thrown in. PHEW. How these girls were managing that AND high heels, i don’t know.

The girls’ hair were styled in sweet little braids with slick, neatly parted roots. With that and all the textures of wool and fur (*more growls*) and what appeared to be silk chiffon, I was beginning to get a rustic, hippy and elvish feel with a suitable addition of elegance. People living in wood shacks in a snowy forest sprang to mind. NATURE sprang to mind.

Model of the moment, Abbey Lee, graced the spotlight towering high and elegant above many of the male models and sporting a dread-lock-esque headpiece herself! After a series of floor skimming gothic-looking gowns, it was time for some colour injection with browns, creams and bold under-skirt splashings of bold red, including a big painted tribal design that followed the hem of a floor-length skirt. It was a show full of twists and turns and surprises.

The lights dimmed and there was a moment of stillness before John Rocha, hand placed on chest as if deeply emotional with gratitude, led all models and creations up and down the catwalk, linking arms with Abbey Lee. She bent down to kiss him on the cheek infront of the cameras before he rushed off stage, clapping the audience saying thank you. A gracious finale to a glorious show!

Photographs by Georgia Takacs

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