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Top 25 Art Blog - Creative Tourist

London Fashion Week A/W 2011: Paul Costelloe (by Amelia)

Paul Costelloe turned up the heat as he opened A/W 2011 London Fashion Week at Somerset House with a sizzling collection of spicy colours worn by sassy ladies in pink pyramid wigs.

Written by Amelia Gregory


Illustration by Artist Andrea

This is my first front row show at London Fashion Week, viagra sale so I’m terribly excited. So far I’ve been stomped on, there pushed and poked in my attempt to view the catwalk, so this good fortune is very much welcomed. A photographer makes his way down the catwalk before the main event starts and snaps the front row. I’m not sure I should be here, but I smile like I own my seat. And as the lights dim, then brilliantly alight once more, my camera is swiftly awakened; lens cap off, switch flicked on, pointing to shoot. Queue the music and it begins.


Illustrations by Fritha Strickland

Monochrome trails the catwalk with authority and chic; a combination of dark strong leather shorts and skirts and light flowing chiffon shirts. Military tailoring softened with fluidity. They’re embellished with a bullet detailing, which, I later learn, is inspired by the Georgian National Ballets costume worn by male ballet dancers. The Georgian National Ballet costumes have also been the source of inspiration for a variety of designers. Did you know that writer Terry Nation’s creation of the Daleks in Doctor Who was inspired by costumes of the Georgian National Ballet too?


The hair compliments the theme. Long Heidi style plaits, careful topknots and intricately braided updos. Clean, neat, confident. And what of the shoes?! I’m tempted to pull a pair of Lako Bukia stunning signature (Mary Jane-esque) heels right off the pretty feet of an unassuming model.

The catwalk changes colour, as the black and whites retreat and the wines, dusky pinks and pearly greys glide in. Colours are good. Colours make me happy. Beautiful swirling chiffon skirts accompanying softly draping silk shirts, then leather trousers and leather skirts and leather shouldered chiffon shirts.


Illustrations by Avril Kelly

On float dreamy wispy dresses. Criss-crossing leather straps add a touch of the urban, reigning in the wearer, back to the city, whilst shoulders of golden coins encourage indulgence and a retreat into the sublime.


Live illustration by Jenny Robins

But it’s the finale that really causes ooohing and aaahing and eyes to widen. A deep blood red dress, its upper half blanketed in golden coins and a skirt that sweeps the floor and ripples as the model moves. It’s obviously the piece the designer is most proud of, as she captures the stage accompanied by her final piece.

More applause and then it’s over and the audience is rushing to get to their next show. A guest sitting in the row behind me is trying to get a hold of something under my seat, so I turn to help her. She jumps back.

“Erm… Can I have your goodie bag,” she asks coyly. Oh my! She had just tried to steal my goodie bag and I had almost let her, I realise. I smile and decline her request. I should probably thank her for alerting me. I’m feeling almost guilty for refusing her now, but hey, this is my first London Fashion Week goody bag and I’m taking it!

All photography by Akeela Bhattay


Illustration by Artist Andrea

This is my first front row show at London Fashion Week, sick so I’m terribly excited. So far I’ve been stomped on, pushed and poked in my attempt to view the catwalk, so this good fortune is very much welcomed. A photographer makes his way down the catwalk before the main event starts and snaps the front row. I’m not sure I should be here, but I smile like I own my seat. And as the lights dim, then brilliantly alight once more, my camera is swiftly awakened; lens cap off, switch flicked on, pointing to shoot. Queue the music and it begins.


Illustrations by Fritha Strickland

Monochrome trails the catwalk with authority and chic; a combination of dark strong leather shorts and skirts and light flowing chiffon shirts. Military tailoring softened with fluidity. They’re embellished with a bullet detailing, which, I later learn, is inspired by the Georgian National Ballets costume worn by male ballet dancers. The Georgian National Ballet costumes have also been the source of inspiration for a variety of designers. Did you know that writer Terry Nation’s creation of the Daleks in Doctor Who was inspired by costumes of the Georgian National Ballet too?


The hair compliments the theme. Long Heidi style plaits, careful topknots and intricately braided updos. Clean, neat, confident. And what of the shoes?! I’m tempted to pull a pair of Lako Bukia stunning signature (Mary Jane-esque) heels right off the pretty feet of an unassuming model.

The catwalk changes colour, as the black and whites retreat and the wines, dusky pinks and pearly greys glide in. Colours are good. Colours make me happy. Beautiful swirling chiffon skirts accompanying softly draping silk shirts, then leather trousers and leather skirts and leather shouldered chiffon shirts.


Illustrations by Avril Kelly

On float dreamy wispy dresses. Criss-crossing leather straps add a touch of the urban, reigning in the wearer, back to the city, whilst shoulders of golden coins encourage indulgence and a retreat into the sublime.


Live illustration by Jenny Robins

But it’s the finale that really causes ooohing and aaahing and eyes to widen. A deep blood red dress, its upper half blanketed in golden coins and a skirt that sweeps the floor and ripples as the model moves. It’s obviously the piece the designer is most proud of, as she captures the stage accompanied by her final piece.

More applause and then it’s over and the audience is rushing to get to their next show. A guest sitting in the row behind me is trying to get a hold of something under my seat, so I turn to help her. She jumps back.

“Erm… Can I have your goodie bag,” she asks coyly. Oh my! She had just tried to steal my goodie bag and I had almost let her, I realise. I smile and decline her request. I should probably thank her for alerting me. I’m feeling almost guilty for refusing her now, but hey, this is my first London Fashion Week goody bag and I’m taking it!

All photography by Akeela Bhattay

See more of Artist Andrea and Jenny Robins’ illustrations in Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration.

Anja Maklar by Madi

Ones to Watch is always one of my favourite parts of London Fashion Week, more about four fresh designers, drug one after another and always packed to the rafters it’s a really nice way to see contrasting styles. Generally it’s a mixed bag, ambulance read our preview here and last year’s review here. Famous spots in the audience were Susie Bubble and Laura Santamaria.

Anja Maklar

The designer presented a collection of pastels, with cut out and overlap details. In answer to Matt’s pondering in his write up of the designer, she has indeed developed some of the key styles which were seen in her SS11 show, in particular the laser cut detail and the triangle shape of her dresses.

This was a fun, pleasantly pastel, colourful collection with plenty to keep the audience interested.

Kirsty Ward

Kirsty Ward by Anne N’Toko

This is definitely a designer to keep your eye on. Part of a growing crop of young graduates who really bring jewellery into their collections, her AW11 offering was brimming with sparkly adornments and beautiful cut clothes. In particular, the use of cut out panels throughout, was very effective.

A palette with gold, bronze and brown, the autumnal colours were accented with sudden all-in-white outfits and stunning oversized necklaces. A favourite for me was the mesh bronze dress, which caught the light beautifully as the model walked down the catwalk.

Sara Bro Jorgensen

Definitely my favourite collection out of the four, Jorgensen has a hint of Mark Fast and Laura Theiss about her designs but has added an edgier, rocky feel to knitted yarns.

Sara Bro Jorgensen by Maria Papadimitriou

Mostly black, her collection showcased knitted dresses with lots of hanging threads and beads. There were also some highly covetable leggings with shiny black slivers of PVC running down the middle of the leg.

My favourite part of the collection, however, was the cute headgear sported by all the models. Little knitted caps in black and dark blue were worn with nearly every single look.

As well as the black, white knitted cardigans and dresses were worn with grey, splatter print swingy trousers and shorts. The black versus white theme was continued with trompe l’oeil printed dresses complete with tuxedo jacket, waistcoat, shirt and bow tiees.

Tze Gogh

Tze Gogh by Joe Turvey

The last of our Ones to Watch is Tze Gogh who graduated from Parsons in New York and then completed his masters at Central Saint Martins.

Gogh’s collection was understated, with clean simple lines in block colours of midnight blue, husky grey and black. The structured coats, dresses and jackets cleverly retained their shape as the models walked and I would love to know what material he uses, but I couldn’t help feeling that more could have been done to make the collection stand out.

However, I do applaud how he has retained from over designing his clothes and has kept a minimal aesthetic.

Anja Maklar by Madi

Ones to Watch is always one of my favourite parts of London Fashion Week, for sale four fresh designers, view one after another and always packed to the rafters, medications it’s a really nice way to see contrasting styles. Generally it’s a mixed bag, read our preview here and last year’s review here. Famous spots in the audience include infamous blogger Susie Bubble and ethical fashion editor Laura Santamaria. The four young designers were profiled ahead of London Fashion Week by Matt, you can read a bit more about their background, influences and style here.

Anja Maklar

The designer presented a collection of pastels, with cut out and overlap details. In answer to Matt’s pondering in his write up of the designer, she has indeed developed some of the key styles which were seen in her SS11 show, in particular the laser cut detail and the triangle shape of her dresses.

This was a fun, pleasantly pastel, colourful collection with plenty to keep the audience interested.

Kirsty Ward

Kirsty Ward by Anne N’Toko

This is definitely a designer to keep your eye on. Part of a growing crop of young graduates who really bring jewellery into their collections, her AW11 offering was brimming with sparkly adornments and beautiful cut clothes. In particular, the use of cut out panels throughout, was very effective.

A palette with gold, bronze and brown, the autumnal colours were accented with sudden all-in-white outfits and stunning oversized necklaces. A favourite for me was the mesh bronze dress, which caught the light beautifully as the model walked down the catwalk.

Sara Bro Jorgensen

Definitely my favourite collection out of the four, Jorgensen has a hint of Mark Fast and Laura Theiss about her designs but has added an edgier, rocky feel to knitted yarns.

Sara Bro Jorgensen by Maria Papadimitriou

Mostly black, her collection showcased knitted dresses with lots of hanging threads and beads. There were also some highly covetable leggings with shiny black slivers of PVC running down the middle of the leg.

My favourite part of the collection, however, was the cute headgear sported by all the models. Little knitted caps in black and dark blue were worn with nearly every single look.

As well as the black, white knitted cardigans and dresses were worn with grey, splatter print swingy trousers and shorts. The black versus white theme was continued with trompe l’oeil printed dresses complete with tuxedo jacket, waistcoat, shirt and bow tiees.

Tze Gogh

Tze Gogh by Joe Turvey

The last of our Ones to Watch is Tze Gogh who graduated from Parsons in New York and then completed his masters at Central Saint Martins.

Gogh’s collection was understated, with clean simple lines in block colours of midnight blue, husky grey and black. The structured coats, dresses and jackets cleverly retained their shape as the models walked and I would love to know what material he uses, but I couldn’t help feeling that more could have been done to make the collection stand out.

However, I do applaud how he has retained from over designing his clothes and has kept a minimal aesthetic.

Anja Maklar by Madi

Ones to Watch is always one of my favourite parts of London Fashion Week, stuff four fresh designers, discount one after another and always packed to the rafters, sales it’s a really nice way to see contrasting styles. Generally it’s a mixed bag, read our preview here and last year’s review here. Famous spots in the audience include infamous blogger Susie Bubble and ethical fashion editor Laura Santamaria. The four young designers were profiled ahead of London Fashion Week by Matt, you can read a bit more about their background, influences and style here.

Anja Maklar

The designer presented a collection of pastels, with cut out and overlap details. In answer to Matt’s pondering in his write up of the designer, she has indeed developed some of the key styles which were seen in her SS11 show, in particular the laser cut detail and the triangle shape of her dresses.

This was a fun, pleasantly pastel, colourful collection with plenty to keep the audience interested.

Kirsty Ward

Kirsty Ward by Anne N’Toko

This is definitely a designer to keep your eye on. Part of a growing crop of young graduates who really bring jewellery into their collections, her AW11 offering was brimming with sparkly adornments and beautiful cut clothes. In particular, the use of cut out panels throughout, was very effective.

A palette with gold, bronze and brown, the autumnal colours were accented with sudden all-in-white outfits and stunning oversized necklaces. A favourite for me was the mesh bronze dress, which caught the light beautifully as the model walked down the catwalk.

Sara Bro Jorgensen

Definitely my favourite collection out of the four, Jorgensen has a hint of Mark Fast and Laura Theiss about her designs but has added an edgier, rocky feel to knitted yarns.

Sara Bro Jorgensen by Maria Papadimitriou

Mostly black, her collection showcased knitted dresses with lots of hanging threads and beads. There were also some highly covetable leggings with shiny black slivers of PVC running down the middle of the leg.

My favourite part of the collection, however, was the cute headgear sported by all the models. Little knitted caps in black and dark blue were worn with nearly every single look.

As well as the black, white knitted cardigans and dresses were worn with grey, splatter print swingy trousers and shorts. The black versus white theme was continued with trompe l’oeil printed dresses complete with tuxedo jacket, waistcoat, shirt and bow tiees.

Tze Gogh

Tze Gogh by Joe Turvey

The last of our Ones to Watch is Tze Gogh who graduated from Parsons in New York and then completed his masters at Central Saint Martins.

Gogh’s collection was understated, with clean simple lines in block colours of midnight blue, husky grey and black. The structured coats, dresses and jackets cleverly retained their shape as the models walked and I would love to know what material he uses, but I couldn’t help feeling that more could have been done to make the collection stand out.

However, I do applaud how he has retained from over designing his clothes and has kept a minimal aesthetic.

Anja Maklar by Madi

Ones to Watch is always one of my favourite parts of London Fashion Week, viagra sale four fresh designers, one after another and always packed to the rafters, it’s a really nice way to see contrasting styles. Generally it’s a mixed bag, read our preview here and last year’s review here. Famous spots in the audience include infamous blogger Susie Bubble and ethical fashion editor Laura Santamaria. The four young designers were profiled ahead of London Fashion Week by Matt, you can read a bit more about their background, influences and style here.

Anja Maklar

The designer presented a collection of pastels, with cut out and overlap details. In answer to Matt’s pondering in his write up of the designer, she has indeed developed some of the key styles which were seen in her SS11 show, in particular the laser cut detail and the triangle shape of her dresses.

This was a fun, pleasantly pastel, colourful collection with plenty to keep the audience interested.

Kirsty Ward

Kirsty Ward by Anne N’Toko

This is definitely a designer to keep your eye on. Part of a growing crop of young graduates who really bring jewellery into their collections, her AW11 offering was brimming with sparkly adornments and beautiful cut clothes. In particular, the use of cut out panels throughout, was very effective.

A palette with gold, bronze and brown, the autumnal colours were accented with sudden all-in-white outfits and stunning oversized necklaces. A favourite for me was the mesh bronze dress, which caught the light beautifully as the model walked down the catwalk.

Sara Bro Jorgensen

Definitely my favourite collection out of the four, Jorgensen has a hint of Mark Fast and Laura Theiss about her designs but has added an edgier, rocky feel to knitted yarns.

Sara Bro Jorgensen by Maria Papadimitriou

Mostly black, her collection showcased knitted dresses with lots of hanging threads and beads. There were also some highly covetable leggings with shiny black slivers of PVC running down the middle of the leg.

My favourite part of the collection, however, was the cute headgear sported by all the models. Little knitted caps in black and dark blue were worn with nearly every single look.

As well as the black, white knitted cardigans and dresses were worn with grey, splatter print swingy trousers and shorts. The black versus white theme was continued with trompe l’oeil printed dresses complete with tuxedo jacket, waistcoat, shirt and bow tiees.

Tze Gogh

Tze Gogh by Joe Turvey

The last of our Ones to Watch is Tze Gogh who graduated from Parsons in New York and then completed his masters at Central Saint Martins.

Gogh’s collection was understated, with clean simple lines in block colours of midnight blue, husky grey and black. The structured coats, dresses and jackets cleverly retained their shape as the models walked and I would love to know what material he uses, but I couldn’t help feeling that more could have been done to make the collection stand out.

However, I do applaud how he has retained from over designing his clothes and has kept a minimal aesthetic.

Anja Maklar by Madi

Ones to Watch is always one of my favourite parts of London Fashion Week, information pills four fresh designers, one after another and always packed to the rafters, it’s a really nice way to see contrasting styles. Generally it’s a mixed bag, read our preview here and last year’s review here. Famous spots in the audience include infamous blogger Susie Bubble and ethical fashion editor Laura Santamaria. The four young designers were profiled ahead of London Fashion Week by Matt, you can read a bit more about their background, influences and style here.

Anja Maklar

The designer presented a collection of pastels, with cut out and overlap details. In answer to Matt’s pondering in his write up of the designer, she has indeed developed some of the key styles which were seen in her SS11 show, in particular the laser cut detail and the triangle shape of her dresses.

This was a fun, pleasantly pastel, colourful collection with plenty to keep the audience interested.

Kirsty Ward

Kirsty Ward by Anne N’Toko

This is definitely a designer to keep your eye on. Part of a growing crop of young graduates who really bring jewellery into their collections, her AW11 offering was brimming with sparkly adornments and beautiful cut clothes. In particular, the use of cut out panels throughout, was very effective.

A palette with gold, bronze and brown, the autumnal colours were accented with sudden all-in-white outfits and stunning oversized necklaces. A favourite for me was the mesh bronze dress, which caught the light beautifully as the model walked down the catwalk.

Sara Bro Jorgensen

Definitely my favourite collection out of the four, Jorgensen has a hint of Mark Fast and Laura Theiss about her designs but has added an edgier, rocky feel to knitted yarns.

Sara Bro Jorgensen by Maria Papadimitriou

Mostly black, her collection showcased knitted dresses with lots of hanging threads and beads. There were also some highly covetable leggings with shiny black slivers of PVC running down the middle of the leg.

My favourite part of the collection, however, was the cute headgear sported by all the models. Little knitted caps in black and dark blue were worn with nearly every single look.

As well as the black, white knitted cardigans and dresses were worn with grey, splatter print swingy trousers and shorts. The black versus white theme was continued with trompe l’oeil printed dresses complete with tuxedo jacket, waistcoat, shirt and bow tiees.

Tze Gogh

Tze Gogh by Joe Turvey

The last of our Ones to Watch is Tze Gogh who graduated from Parsons in New York and then completed his masters at Central Saint Martins.

Gogh’s collection was understated, with clean simple lines in block colours of midnight blue, husky grey and black. The structured coats, dresses and jackets cleverly retained their shape as the models walked and I would love to know what material he uses, but I couldn’t help feeling that more could have been done to make the collection stand out.

However, I do applaud how he has retained from over designing his clothes and has kept a minimal aesthetic.

Anja Maklar by Madi

Ones to Watch is always one of my favourite parts of London Fashion Week, online four fresh designers, pharmacy one after another and always packed to the rafters, visit this it’s a really nice way to see contrasting styles. Generally it’s a mixed bag, read our preview here and last year’s review here. Famous spots in the audience include infamous blogger Susie Bubble and ethical fashion editor Laura Santamaria. The four young designers were profiled ahead of London Fashion Week by Matt, you can read a bit more about their background, influences and style here.

Anja Maklar

The designer presented a collection of pastels, with cut out and overlap details. In answer to Matt’s pondering in his write up of the designer, she has indeed developed some of the key styles which were seen in her SS11 show, in particular the laser cut detail and the triangle shape of her dresses.

This was a fun, pleasantly pastel, colourful collection with plenty to keep the audience interested.

Kirsty Ward

Kirsty Ward by Anne N’Toko

This is definitely a designer to keep your eye on. Part of a growing crop of young graduates who really bring jewellery into their collections, her AW11 offering was brimming with sparkly adornments and beautiful cut clothes. In particular, the use of cut out panels throughout, was very effective.

A palette with gold, bronze and brown, the autumnal colours were accented with sudden all-in-white outfits and stunning oversized necklaces. A favourite for me was the mesh bronze dress, which caught the light beautifully as the model walked down the catwalk.

Sara Bro Jorgensen

Definitely my favourite collection out of the four, Jorgensen has a hint of Mark Fast and Laura Theiss about her designs but has added an edgier, rocky feel to knitted yarns.

Sara Bro Jorgensen by Maria Papadimitriou

Mostly black, her collection showcased knitted dresses with lots of hanging threads and beads. There were also some highly covetable leggings with shiny black slivers of PVC running down the middle of the leg.

My favourite part of the collection, however, was the cute headgear sported by all the models. Little knitted caps in black and dark blue were worn with nearly every single look.

As well as the black, white knitted cardigans and dresses were worn with grey, splatter print swingy trousers and shorts. The black versus white theme was continued with trompe l’oeil printed dresses complete with tuxedo jacket, waistcoat, shirt and bow tiees.

Tze Gogh

Tze Gogh by Joe Turvey

The last of our Ones to Watch is Tze Gogh who graduated from Parsons in New York and then completed his masters at Central Saint Martins.

Gogh’s collection was understated, with clean simple lines in block colours of midnight blue, husky grey and black. The structured coats, dresses and jackets cleverly retained their shape as the models walked and I would love to know what material he uses, but I couldn’t help feeling that more could have been done to make the collection stand out.

However, I do applaud how he has retained from over designing his clothes and has kept a minimal aesthetic.

Anja Maklar by Madi

Ones to Watch is always one of my favourite parts of London Fashion Week, sildenafil four fresh designers, doctor one after another and always packed to the rafters, dosage it’s a really nice way to see contrasting styles. Generally it’s a mixed bag, read our preview here and last year’s review here. Famous spots in the audience include infamous blogger Susie Bubble and ethical fashion editor Laura Santamaria. The four young designers were profiled ahead of London Fashion Week by Matt, you can read a bit more about their background, influences and style here.

Anja Maklar

The designer presented a collection of pastels, with cut out and overlap details. In answer to Matt’s pondering in his write up of the designer, she has indeed developed some of the key styles which were seen in her SS11 show, in particular the laser cut detail and the triangle shape of her dresses.

This was a fun, pleasantly pastel, colourful collection with plenty to keep the audience interested.

Kirsty Ward

Kirsty Ward by Anne N’Toko

This is definitely a designer to keep your eye on. Part of a growing crop of young graduates who really bring jewellery into their collections, her AW11 offering was brimming with sparkly adornments and beautiful cut clothes. In particular, the use of cut out panels throughout, was very effective.

A palette with gold, bronze and brown, the autumnal colours were accented with sudden all-in-white outfits and stunning oversized necklaces. A favourite for me was the mesh bronze dress, which caught the light beautifully as the model walked down the catwalk.

Sara Bro Jorgensen

Definitely my favourite collection out of the four, Jorgensen has a hint of Mark Fast and Laura Theiss about her designs but has added an edgier, rocky feel to knitted yarns.

Sara Bro Jorgensen by Maria Papadimitriou

Mostly black, her collection showcased knitted dresses with lots of hanging threads and beads. There were also some highly covetable leggings with shiny black slivers of PVC running down the middle of the leg.

My favourite part of the collection, however, was the cute headgear sported by all the models. Little knitted caps in black and dark blue were worn with nearly every single look.

As well as the black, white knitted cardigans and dresses were worn with grey, splatter print swingy trousers and shorts. The black versus white theme was continued with trompe l’oeil printed dresses complete with tuxedo jacket, waistcoat, shirt and bow tiees.

Tze Gogh

Tze Gogh by Joe Turvey

The last of our Ones to Watch is Tze Gogh who graduated from Parsons in New York and then completed his masters at Central Saint Martins.

Gogh’s collection was understated, with clean simple lines in block colours of midnight blue, husky grey and black. The structured coats, dresses and jackets cleverly retained their shape as the models walked and I would love to know what material he uses, but I couldn’t help feeling that more could have been done to make the collection stand out.

However, I do applaud how he has retained from over designing his clothes and has kept a minimal aesthetic.

Paul Costelloe A/W 2011 by Ellie Sutton
Paul Costelloe A/W 2011 by Ellie Sutton.

Those in the business know that I took quite a few years off from attending the shows, check but I’ve been gradually creeping back into LFW and this season Amelia’s Magazine really has been out in force. I’ve attended a record number of catwalk shows and presentations, approved leaving me very little time to actually write or edit photos and commission illustrations. Meanwhile, side effects my wonderful team of contributors have been working their collective butt off. With the result that this is our third blog post about Paul Costelloe… and only my first. And it’s a WEEK since the shows started. Tut tut.

Paul Costelloe A/W 2011 by Antonia ParkerAntonia-Parker-A-W-2011-Paul-Costelloe-A
Paul Costelloe A/W 2011 by Antonia Parker.

Last season Paul really cemented his comeback with a well received opener to S/S LFW – which would explain why this show seemed so much better attended than the last… good words can spread like wildfire in fashion land. This season he did it again, despite rumours swirling around on the day that the label went into receivership recently – a quick google search revealing that a new backer in the form of Calvelex was unveiled on the same day of his A/W show. This time it was not his sons but his towering opera singing flame-haired daughter that Paul sent down the catwalk. Does he have anymore offspring squirrelled around somewhere? If not, who the hell will do the familial duty next season?

Paul Costelloe A-W 2011-daughter Jessica
Paul’s daughter Jessica opened the show. Photography by Amelia Gregory.

Once Amazonian daughter Jessica had left centre stage with a cocky little smile it was down to business as four pink pyramid-haired ladies strode onto the catwalk en masse, resplendent in emerald and fern green boucle tweed and textured metallic silks swinging coat dresses.

Paul Costelloe A/W 2011 by jenny robins
Paul Costelloe A/W 2011 by Jenny Robins.

Paul Costelloe A/W 2011 by Karla Pérez Manrique
Paul Costelloe A/W 2011 by Karla Pérez Manrique.

The collection swiftly moved through a spectrum of mustards, oranges and red checks on big collared dresses, boxy crop jackets and mini skater skirts, interspersed by the odd splash of luxurious menswear – my favourite being a sumptuous deep red velvet jacket. Swing shapes, splashy flower prints, cowl necks and big collars were the order of the day. Extremely delish, and very more-ish.

Paul Costelloe A/W 2011 by Amelia GregoryPaul Costelloe A/W 2011 by Amelia GregoryPaul Costelloe A/W 2011 by Amelia GregoryPaul Costelloe A/W 2011 by Amelia GregoryPaul Costelloe A/W 2011 by Amelia GregoryPaul Costelloe A/W 2011 by Amelia GregoryPaul Costelloe A/W 2011 by Amelia GregoryPaul Costelloe A/W 2011 by Amelia GregoryPaul Costelloe A/W 2011 by Amelia GregoryPaul Costelloe A/W 2011 by Amelia GregoryPaul Costelloe A/W 2011 by Amelia GregoryPaul Costelloe A/W 2011 by Amelia GregoryPaul Costelloe A/W 2011 by Amelia GregoryPaul Costelloe A/W 2011 by Amelia GregoryPaul Costelloe A/W 2011 by Amelia GregoryPaul Costelloe A/W 2011 by Amelia GregoryPaul Costelloe A/W 2011 by Amelia GregoryPaul Costelloe A/W 2011 by Amelia GregoryPaul Costelloe A/W 2011 by Amelia GregoryPaul Costelloe A/W 2011 by Amelia GregoryPaul Costelloe A/W 2011 by Amelia GregoryPaul Costelloe A/W 2011 by Amelia GregoryPaul Costelloe A/W 2011 by Amelia Gregory

Paul Costelloe A/W 2011. All photography by Amelia Gregory.LFW A-W 2011-Paul Costelloe family
I managed to sneak a quick photo of Paul Costelloe as he was leaving Somerset House with his massive brood; Paul resplendent in a pair of sparkling new white pumps.

Read Matt Bramford’s review of the show here, and Jemma Crow’s review here. You can see more of Antonia Parker and Jenny Robins’ illustrations in Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration.

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