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Top 25 Art Blog - Creative Tourist

London Fashion Week Catwalk Review: Swedish School of Textiles 2010 Graduate Show

An astonishing graduate catwalk show from the Swedish School of Textiles, showing for the first time as part of LFW at the Freemasons' Hall on Tuesday 21st September 2010.

Written by Amelia Gregory


Illustration by Abby Wright

It’s always a treat at Fashion Week to find that the show you are about to see, website starting in the next few minutes, is at a totally different venue to the one you had in your head and are currently standing at. I found myself in this marvellous situation as Tim Soar’s show approached. God knows why I thought it was at Somerset House and not at the Freemason’s Hall. Menswear day brought these kind of surprises all day – with many designers scaling down their presence. I had seen Tim’s show a year ago in the BFC tent, so how dare they move its location?!

I need not have worried as I legged it up Drury Lane, for, true to form, the show was running late and hadn’t even been seated when I showed up. I was right at the back of the queue, though – AGAIN – so decided to perch by the photographer’s pit in the hope of getting a better shot than I would have positioned on one of the back rows.

This show saw Soar draw inspiration from the 1970s, and in particular David Bowie’s character ‘Mr Newton’ in Nicholas Roeg’s epic ‘The Man Who Fell From Earth.’ This inspiration was, in true Tim Soar style, handled with delicacy and acted only as a descrete reference here and there. Trousers flared off, but not in a grotesque fancy dress sense, and lapels were elongated, but not in a Stayin’ Alive, Stayin’ Alive, Hah Hah Hah Hah sense. The bulk of the collection relied on Soar’s showmanship as a really great tailor with a unique vision.


Illustration by Abby Wright

Making the best use of luxe fabrics like mohair, satin, wool crepe and linen, models wore strict suits with a piecemeal utilitarian aesthetic. The use of Tyvek, the waxy crushed industrial material usually reserved for workers boiler suits, also adds to this technical flavour.

Blazers were banded with cummerbund-like straps in contrasting colours – where jackets were dark, the bands were of gold silk, and where jackets were sand, the bands were black. Denim made an appearance, also creating horizontal lines across structured tailoring.

Alongside this semi-formal attire, there were the usual design quirks that Tim Soar is quickly faming himself for. His appreciation of the aesthetic properties of materials and quality of texture was also on display, with crushed materials and bursts of vibrant colour (he is, after all, also a graphic designer).

It’s hard to imagine how a Tyvek jailer-style striped suit will work alongside an exemplary tailored blazer, but somehow Tim Soar’s collections always convey a stylish coherence.

This season also brought more womenswear, which is basically menswear with allowances for hips, busts and bums. It’s a testament to Tim Soar’s generally cool attitude, though, that his aesthetic works wonders on both women and men.


Illustration by Abby Wright

It’s always a treat at Fashion Week to find that the show you are about to see, price starting in the next few minutes, is at a totally different venue to the one you had in your head and are currently standing at. I found myself in this marvellous situation as Tim Soar’s show approached. God knows why I thought it was at Somerset House and not at the Freemason’s Hall. Menswear day brought these kind of surprises all day – with many designers scaling down their presence. I had seen Tim’s show a year ago in the BFC tent, so how dare they move its location?!

I need not have worried as I legged it up Drury Lane, for, true to form, the show was running late and hadn’t even been seated when I showed up. I was right at the back of the queue, though – AGAIN – so decided to perch by the photographer’s pit in the hope of getting a better shot than I would have positioned on one of the back rows.

This show saw Soar draw inspiration from the 1970s, and in particular David Bowie’s character ‘Mr Newton’ in Nicholas Roeg’s epic ‘The Man Who Fell From Earth.’ This inspiration was, in true Tim Soar style, handled with delicacy and acted only as a descrete reference here and there. Trousers flared off, but not in a grotesque fancy dress sense, and lapels were elongated, but not in a Stayin’ Alive, Stayin’ Alive, Hah Hah Hah Hah sense. The bulk of the collection relied on Soar’s showmanship as a really great tailor with a unique vision.


Illustration by Abby Wright

Making the best use of luxe fabrics like mohair, satin, wool crepe and linen, models wore strict suits with a piecemeal utilitarian aesthetic. The use of Tyvek, the waxy crushed industrial material usually reserved for workers boiler suits, also adds to this technical flavour.

Blazers were banded with cummerbund-like straps in contrasting colours – where jackets were dark, the bands were of gold silk, and where jackets were sand, the bands were black. Denim made an appearance, also creating horizontal lines across structured tailoring.

Alongside this semi-formal attire, there were the usual design quirks that Tim Soar is quickly faming himself for. His appreciation of the aesthetic properties of materials and quality of texture was also on display, with crushed materials and bursts of vibrant colour (he is, after all, also a graphic designer).

It’s hard to imagine how a Tyvek jailer-style striped suit will work alongside an exemplary tailored blazer, but somehow Tim Soar’s collections always convey a stylish coherence.

This season also brought more womenswear, which is basically menswear with allowances for hips, busts and bums. It’s a testament to Tim Soar’s generally cool attitude, though, that his aesthetic works wonders on both women and men.


Illustration by Abby Wright

It’s always a treat at Fashion Week to find that the show you are about to see, more about starting in the next few minutes, is at a totally different venue to the one you had in your head and are currently standing at. I found myself in this marvellous situation as Tim Soar‘s show approached. God knows why I thought it was at Somerset House and not at the Freemason’s Hall. Menswear day brought these kind of surprises all day – with many designers scaling down their presence. I had seen Tim’s show a year ago in the BFC tent, recipe so how dare they move its location?!

I need not have worried as I legged it up Drury Lane, for, true to form, the show was running late and hadn’t even been seated when I showed up. I was right at the back of the queue, though – AGAIN – so decided to perch by the photographer’s pit in the hope of getting a better shot than I would have positioned on one of the back rows.

This show saw Soar draw inspiration from the 1970s, and in particular David Bowie’s character ‘Mr Newton’ in Nicholas Roeg’s epic ‘The Man Who Fell To Earth.’ This inspiration was, in true Tim Soar style, handled with delicacy and acted only as a descrete reference here and there. Trousers flared off, but not in a grotesque fancy dress sense, and lapels were elongated, but not in a Stayin’ Alive, Stayin’ Alive, Hah Hah Hah Hah sense. The bulk of the collection relied on Soar’s showmanship as a really great tailor with a unique vision.


Illustration by Abby Wright

Making the best use of luxe fabrics like mohair, satin, wool crepe and linen, models wore strict suits with a piecemeal utilitarian aesthetic. The use of Tyvek, the waxy crushed industrial material usually reserved for workers boiler suits, also adds to this technical flavour.

Blazers were banded with cummerbund-like straps in contrasting colours – where jackets were dark, the bands were of gold silk, and where jackets were sand, the bands were black. Denim made an appearance, also creating horizontal lines across structured tailoring.

Alongside this semi-formal attire, there were the usual design quirks that Tim Soar is quickly faming himself for. His appreciation of the aesthetic properties of materials and quality of texture was also on display, with crushed materials and bursts of vibrant colour (he is, after all, also a graphic designer).

It’s hard to imagine how a Tyvek jailer-style striped suit will work alongside an exemplary tailored blazer, but somehow Tim Soar’s collections always convey a stylish coherence.

This season also brought more womenswear, which is basically menswear with allowances for hips, busts and bums. It’s a testament to Tim Soar’s generally cool attitude, though, that his aesthetic works wonders on both women and men.

All photography by Matt Bramford
sara anderson by laura callaghan
Sara Anderson by Laura Callaghan.

Every now and again fashion week throws up something truly astonishing that I didn’t know about before… and on this occasion that honour must surely go to the unexpectedly fabulous graduate show from the Swedish School of Textiles, viagra showing for the first time at LFW. I sat with my old intern Sarah Barnes of Uplift Magazine, check so we had a good chance to catch up on the gossip before the show started to a very under capacity audience.

Swedish Textiles SS2011 Stina Randstad photo by Amelia Gregory
Swedish Textiles SS2011 Stina Randstad photo by Amelia Gregory
Stina Randstad. All photography by Amelia Gregory.

Of course, it is to be expected that the crowd might be a little sparse for the first year that someone shows at LFW, but it is nevertheless somewhat bemusing to be provided with so little information about the contributing graduates; nothing beyond the flimsiest of explanations on our seats. Not even a list of designers! It baffles me that an institution would go to all the cost of sending their graduates over to the UK and then neglect the most basic of PR opportunities. To keep up I had to take photos of the projection of the back wall between collections, and then squint through them to label each designer correctly. About the individual students I know nothing more: I can’t even find a website for the college.

Swedish Textiles SS2011 Emelie Johansson photo by Amelia Gregory
Swedish Textiles SS2011 Emelie Johansson photo by Amelia Gregory
Emelie Johansson.

I had absolutely no expectations bar a pretty good gut feeling that as a former textile designer myself I was going to like what I saw. I could not have been more on the mark.

Swedish-Textiles-2-by-Lisa-Stannard
Sara Anderson and Emelie Johansson by Lisa Stannard.

Swedish Textiles 2010 students photo by Amelia Gregory
Students rollcall.

The opening collection, Prepositions by Sara Anderson, was a pretty good indicator of things to come. Models strode down the catwalk in what looked like the lime and carrot angular offcuts of some 60s furniture factory mishap – great angular bulks attached to head, waist and shoulder. Glistening metallic fabrics and foiled polka dots completed the look. And instantly my interior art director gremlin was hopping up and down with excitement just thinking about what our illustrators could do once they sunk their teeth into this.

Swedish Textiles 2010 Sara Anderson photo by Amelia Gregory
Swedish Textiles 2010 Sara Anderson photo by Amelia Gregory
Swedish Textiles 2010 Sara Anderson photo by Amelia Gregory
Swedish Textiles 2010 Sara Anderson photo by Amelia Gregory
Sara Anderson.

Next up was a fabulous menswear collection from Johanna Milvert. Just the right side of barking, it featured massively oversized sleeves and bulbous mismatched proportions that cocooned the models in deep orange deck chair stripes and ribbed knits. A lopsided leather man bag was a particularly individual touch.

Swedish Textiles 2010 Johanna Milvert photo by Amelia Gregory
Swedish Textiles 2010 Johanna Milvert photo by Amelia Gregory
Swedish Textiles 2010 Johanna Milvert photo by Amelia Gregory
Swedish Textiles 2010 Johanna Milvert photo by Amelia Gregory
Swedish Textiles 2010 Johanna Milvert photo by Amelia Gregory
Swedish Textiles 2010 Johanna Milvert photo by Amelia Gregory
johanna milvert by laura callaghan
Johanna Milvert by Laura Callaghan.

This was followed by a relatively calm collection, Efterklang by Elin Klevmar, in which the lopsided theme continued apace as the models strode down the catwalk in softly draped pebble and cream coloured loungewear.

Swedish Textiles 2010 Elin Klevmar photo by Amelia Gregory
Swedish Textiles 2010 Elin Klevmar photo by Amelia Gregory
Swedish Textiles 2010 Elin Klevmar photo by Amelia Gregory
Swedish Textiles 2010 Elin Klevmar photo by Amelia Gregory
elin klevmar by laura callaghan
Elin Klevmar by Laura Callaghan.

Stina Randstad’s Breed hit the catwalk in an outrageous large shouldered ruffled denim affair that Leigh Bowery would have been proud to wear. Mixing African fabrics, Scottish tartan and 80s pop art club kid inspired prints shouldn’t work but it somehow did – we need more of this kind of inspired madness at the shows. Tartan rara skirts, veil like head necklaces, knitted cockerel crests, crazy facepaint and huge superhero shaped tailoring: this collection really did have it all… and I say that in a good way.

Swedish Textiles 2010 Stina Randstad photo by Amelia Gregory
Swedish Textiles 2010 Stina Randstad photo by Amelia Gregory
Swedish Textiles 2010 Stina Randstad photo by Amelia Gregory
Swedish Textiles 2010 Stina Randstad photo by Amelia Gregory
Swedish Textiles 2010 Stina Randstad photo by Amelia Gregory
Swedish Textiles 2010 Stina Randstad photo by Amelia Gregory
Swedish Textiles 2010 Stina Randstad photo by Amelia Gregory
Stina Randstad.

Structure is Everything by Emelie Johansson appeared to have been influenced by coloured pencil shavings. Taking oversized accessories to the next level some of the headdresses resembled alienesque head tumours that would surely not look out of place on the deck of the Starship Enterprise. Peeking out from beneath the styling madness were some really wonderfully constructed primary coloured garments.

Swedish Textiles 2010 Emelie Johansson photo by Amelia Gregory
Swedish Textiles 2010 Emelie Johansson photo by Amelia Gregory
Swedish Textiles 2010 Emelie Johansson photo by Amelia Gregory
Swedish Textiles 2010 Emelie Johansson photo by Amelia Gregory
LFW Swedish Textiles Emelie Johansson KAYLEIGH BLUCK
Emelie Johansson by Kayleigh Bluck.

Another menswear collection from Jennie Siljedahl – Control Me As I Control You – showcased autumnal themed pieces in quilted golds, reds and burnt orange, all accessorised with big recycled necklaces and arm jewellery. I particularly liked the overgrown eyebrow glasses.

Swedish Textiles 2010 Jennie Siljedahl photo by Amelia Gregory
Swedish Textiles 2010 Jennie Siljedahl photo by Amelia Gregory
Swedish Textiles 2010 Jennie Siljedahl photo by Amelia Gregory
LFW Swedish Textiles Jennie Siljedahl  KAYLEIGH BLUCK
Jennie Siljedahl by Kayleigh Bluck.

Swedish-Textiles-Jennie Siljedahl-by-Lisa-Stannard
Jennie Siljedahl by Lisa Stannard.

Elin Sundling‘s monochrome collection I Paint Myself Into A Corner featured models who looked as if they had been dragged through the cobwebs of an attic – gauzy face netting gave a sinister feel to (another) lovingly cut lopsided collection that featured some fabulous dusty and oily prints.

Swedish Textiles 2010 Elin Sundling photo by Amelia Gregory
Swedish Textiles 2010 Elin Sundling photo by Amelia Gregory
Swedish Textiles 2010 Elin Sundling photo by Amelia Gregory
Swedish Textiles 2010 Elin Sundling photo by Amelia Gregory
Swedish Textiles 2010 Elin Sundling photo by Amelia Gregory
Elin Sundling.

For sheer styling nuttiness though the prize had to go to Ellinor Nilsen with Nobodies – she sent models down the catwalk in strange eyeless masks, fake hair protruding from all the wrong places in all the wrong colours. One can only presume the models practiced beforehand by counting their steps, for it all went off seamlessly. Beneath the amazing masks knitwear and tailoring took inspiration from the hairy fuzzy scratchy parts of bodies. Particularly odd was a hair print dress. Unlike anything I’ve ever seen.

Swedish Textiles 2010 Ellinor Nilsen photo by Amelia Gregory
Swedish Textiles 2010 Ellinor Nilsen photo by Amelia Gregory
Swedish Textiles 2010 Ellinor Nilsen photo by Amelia Gregory
Swedish Textiles 2010 Ellinor Nilsen photo by Amelia Gregory
Swedish Textiles 2010 Ellinor Nilsen photo by Amelia Gregory
Swedish Textiles 2010 Ellinor Nilsen photo by Amelia Gregory
Swedish Textiles 2010 Ellinor Nilsen photo by Amelia Gregory
Ellinor Nilsen.

Charlotta Mattson’s dark collection was perhaps most instantly notable for her angular neck adornments that echoed the theme on many other catwalks this season, but I also particularly liked the use of swirling linear black on white prints that encased legs, head and fabulous shoes. Oh and did I mention the fabulous shoes? Fabulous they were.

Swedish Textiles 2010 Charlotta Mattson photo by Amelia Gregory
Swedish Textiles 2010 Charlotta Mattson photo by Amelia Gregory
Swedish Textiles 2010 Charlotta Mattson photo by Amelia Gregory
Swedish Textiles 2010 Charlotta Mattson photo by Amelia Gregory
Swedish Textiles 2010 Charlotta Mattson photo by Amelia Gregory
Swedish Textiles 2010 Charlotta Mattson photo by Amelia Gregory
Swedish Textiles 2010 Charlotta Mattson photo by Amelia Gregory
Charlotta Mattson.

Hommage featured bulky pants, cowled hoods and bleached floral prints on menswear from David Soderlund, all accessorised with giant resin scorpion jewellery. An open shirt over bleached print jean shorts held up with red braces was a particularly strong look.

Swedish Textiles 2010 David Soderland photo by Amelia Gregory
Swedish Textiles 2010 David Soderland photo by Amelia Gregory
Swedish Textiles 2010 David Soderland photo by Amelia Gregory
Swedish Textiles 2010 David Soderland photo by Amelia Gregory
David Soderlund.

Finally Helena Quist showed a kimono and kaftan inspired collection in which the colouring was particularly strong. Stripes, overgrown pompoms, metallics, tassels and block prints jostled together in a stunning combination that closed the show.

Swedish Textiles 2010 Helena Quist photo by Amelia Gregory
Swedish Textiles 2010 Helena Quist photo by Amelia Gregory
Swedish Textiles 2010 Helena Quist photo by Amelia Gregory
Swedish Textiles 2010 Helena Quist photo by Amelia Gregory
Swedish Textiles 2010 Helena Quist photo by Amelia Gregory
Swedish Textiles 2010 Helena Quist photo by Amelia Gregory
Swedish Textiles 2010 Helena Quist photo by Amelia Gregory
LFW Swedish Textiles Helena Quist KAYLEIGH BLUCK
Helena Quist by Kayleigh Bluck.

I hope the Swedish School of Textiles will be back next year. Somehow I don’t think they will have any trouble packing out their second show… but please please sort out your promotion. NONE of these students has a proper internet presence; not one functioning website that I could find. Shocking in this day and age.

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3 Responses to “London Fashion Week Catwalk Review: Swedish School of Textiles 2010 Graduate Show”

  1. Amelia says:

    Today I got an email from two of the graduates who were in this show, and they asked me to include this address as a website where you can find out more about them – I did tell them to do it themselves, but here goes: for more info on these students see here, it’s in swedish but there’s a good little video of the show http://designbystudents.com/

  2. Amelia says:

    And here’s another link, which originally had a hellish url. Don’t they do SEO in Sweden?! http://tinyurl.com/26t8dmh

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