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Top 25 Art Blog - Creative Tourist

London Fashion Week S/S 2011 Catwalk Review: Hermoine de Paula

Hermione de Paula returned to London Fashion Week with a bang… fabulously illustrated by Zarina Liew

Written by Naomi Law


Aiming to promote recent graduates onto a more commercially viable platform, more about pilule Fashion Mode launched this September with a show on the 19th amid a lot of glitzy PR and press releases. The initiative is aiming ‘to bring back cutting edge fashion to London’, pill enabling our ‘young fledgling designers…to be cultivated, supported and cherished’. Aside from the rather slushy blurb surrounding it, the ensuing show was enjoyable and a few gems were sent down the catwalk. Celeb top spot of the day must go to Nick Knowles of DIY SOS fame, who turned up with a man wearing a huge paper sock hat on his head. If anyone can shed any light on this guy, I would be so happy to find out more.


See background for ‘man in hat’ with Nick Knowles

First onto the runway was Carlotta Actis Barone with a collection that reminded me of the kind of clothes clichéd royals in storybooks wear. Dark dramatic reds, with big shoulders and lots of dangly bits hanging off, the collection featured draped and knotted dresses, plus work style dungarees. The hair, which usually passes me by on the catwalk, was amazing (up do’s with lots of boof) so congrats must go to Toni and Guy who styled the whole event.


Illustration by Michelle Urvall Nyren

The Wear My Skin collection is based on the fight against racism and the clothes attempt to represent workers clothes on the plantation fields. The skin element is portrayed using scribbled-print, black-and-white body con dresses, polo necks and leggings under all of the garments. A bit like those sleeves you buy when you want to look like you have a tattoo but an interesting way of pulling together collection none the less.

Next out was James Hillman, who based his collection on the 59 Bike Club, Teddy Boy look and a desire for simplicity. I will remember it for different reasons: the poor model who had to walk down the runway in a see through dress, the adorable grandma bursting with pride as her grandson (not in a see through dress) walked down the catwalk, and the stifling heat taking hold of the hall. NB Most people had picked up fans from the previous show and were fine…not me though.


Illustration by Michelle Urvall Nyren

His collection was very neutral and very beige/grey/brown. The use of fabrics generally reserved for womenswear was a promising idea but wasn’t used to a great effect. The semi-opaque trousers and jacket/dress were fun but I expected more from someone who defines themselves on their use of simplicity, tailoring and well styled masculinity. I did however, love the army boots which were worn with every outfit including the smarter tailored suits.


Illustration by Gareth A Hopkins

Elson Figueiredo is inspired by 19th century European carnies and uses 100% organic fair-trade cottons. He presented a really strong collection with nicely tailored jackets, mid length coats and loose fit chino-esque trousers. His self-description of ‘quirky and distinctive’ is perfect. The jackets are well cut and the added elbow pads and red edgings on pockets and lapels were definitely a bonus for me in terms of well thought through details.


The beige knee length coat worn with characteristic edging details was the highlight of the show for me, and slightly different from all of the other pieces he sent down the runway.

The star of the show (kept till last) was Florian Jayet. I really enjoyed his collection and many influences were prevalent in his styling – he interned with Alexander McQueen. Jayet’s S/S 2011 collection is inspired by insects and armour style garments. Mainly white, black and silver his pieces were futuristic yet very of the moment with sculptured shoulders, padding and defining shapes.


Using metallic fabrics and leather, his robust exoskeleton pieces are often softened with a long draped skirt or a flimsy top. Also, again with the noticing of the hair, I like the sharp pulled back ponytails sported by all the models.


My ones to watch are definitely Figueiredo and Jayet. They presented collections with distinctive yet restrained looks rather than over designing pieces a la River Island chic.

All photography by Florence Masssey


Illustration by Gemma Randall

Aiming to promote recent graduates onto a more commercially viable platform, dosage Fashion Mode launched this September with a show on the 19th amid a lot of glitzy PR and press releases. The initiative is aiming ‘to bring back cutting edge fashion to London’, drugs enabling our ‘young fledgling designers…to be cultivated, this supported and cherished’. Aside from the rather slushy blurb surrounding it, the ensuing show was enjoyable and a few gems were sent down the catwalk. Celeb top spot of the day must go to Nick Knowles of DIY SOS fame, who turned up with a man wearing a huge paper sock hat on his head. If anyone can shed any light on this guy, I would be so happy to find out more.


See background for ‘man in hat’ with Nick Knowles

First onto the runway was Carlotta Actis Barone with a collection that reminded me of the kind of clothes clichéd royals in storybooks wear. Dark dramatic reds, with big shoulders and lots of dangly bits hanging off, the collection featured draped and knotted dresses, plus work style dungarees. The hair, which usually passes me by on the catwalk, was amazing (up do’s with lots of boof) so congrats must go to Toni and Guy who styled the whole event.


Illustration by Michelle Urvall Nyren

The Wear My Skin collection is based on the fight against racism and the clothes attempt to represent workers clothes on the plantation fields. The skin element is portrayed using scribbled-print, black-and-white body con dresses, polo necks and leggings under all of the garments. A bit like those sleeves you buy when you want to look like you have a tattoo but an interesting way of pulling together collection none the less.

Next out was James Hillman, who based his collection on the 59 Bike Club, Teddy Boy look and a desire for simplicity. I will remember it for different reasons: the poor male model who had to walk down the runway in a see through dress, the adorable grandma bursting with pride as her grandson (not in a see through dress) walked down the catwalk, and the stifling heat taking hold of the hall. NB Most people had picked up fans from the previous show and were fine…not me though.


Illustration by Michelle Urvall Nyren

His collection was very neutral and very beige/grey/brown. The use of fabrics generally reserved for womenswear was a promising idea but wasn’t used to a great effect. The semi-opaque trousers and jacket/dress were fun but I expected more from someone who defines themselves on their use of simplicity, tailoring and well styled masculinity. I did however, love the army boots which were worn with every outfit including the smarter tailored suits.


Illustration by Gareth A Hopkins

Elson Figueiredo is inspired by 19th century European carnies and uses 100% organic fair-trade cottons. He presented a really strong collection with nicely tailored jackets, mid length coats and loose fit chino-esque trousers. His self-description of ‘quirky and distinctive’ is perfect. The jackets are well cut and the added elbow pads and red edgings on pockets and lapels were definitely a bonus for me in terms of well thought through details.


The beige knee length coat worn with characteristic edging details was the highlight of the show for me, and slightly different from all of the other pieces he sent down the runway.

The star of the show (kept till last) was Florian Jayet. I really enjoyed his collection and many influences were prevalent in his styling – he interned with Alexander McQueen. Jayet’s S/S 2011 collection is inspired by insects and armour style garments. Mainly white, black and silver his pieces were futuristic yet very of the moment with sculptured shoulders, padding and defining shapes.


Using metallic fabrics and leather, his robust exoskeleton pieces are often softened with a long draped skirt or a flimsy top. Also, again with the noticing of the hair, I like the sharp pulled back ponytails sported by all the models.


My ones to watch are definitely Figueiredo and Jayet. They presented collections with distinctive yet restrained looks rather than over designing pieces a la River Island chic.

All photography by Florence Masssey


Illustration by Gemma Randall

Aiming to promote recent graduates onto a more commercially viable platform, information pills Fashion Mode launched this September with a show on the 19th amid a lot of glitzy PR and press releases. The initiative is aiming ‘to bring back cutting edge fashion to London’, troche enabling our ‘young fledgling designers…to be cultivated, for sale supported and cherished’. Aside from the rather slushy blurb surrounding it, the ensuing show was enjoyable and a few gems were sent down the catwalk. Celeb top spot of the day must go to Nick Knowles of DIY SOS fame, who turned up with a man wearing a huge paper sock hat on his head. If anyone can shed any light on this guy, I would be so happy to find out more.


See background for ‘man in hat’ with Nick Knowles

First onto the runway was Carlotta Actis Barone with a collection that reminded me of the kind of clothes clichéd royals in storybooks wear. Dark dramatic reds, with big shoulders and lots of dangly bits hanging off, the collection featured draped and knotted dresses, plus work style dungarees. The hair, which usually passes me by on the catwalk, was amazing (up do’s with lots of boof) so congrats must go to Toni and Guy who styled the whole event.


Illustration by Michelle Urvall Nyren

The Wear My Skin collection is based on the fight against racism and the clothes attempt to represent workers clothes on the plantation fields. The skin element is portrayed using scribbled-print, black-and-white body con dresses, polo necks and leggings under all of the garments. A bit like those sleeves you buy when you want to look like you have a tattoo but an interesting way of pulling together collection none the less.

Next out was James Hillman, who based his collection on the 59 Bike Club, Teddy Boy look and a desire for simplicity. I will remember it for different reasons: the poor male model who had to walk down the runway in a see through dress, the adorable grandma bursting with pride as her grandson (not in a see through dress) walked down the catwalk, and the stifling heat taking hold of the hall. NB Most people had picked up fans from the previous show and were fine…not me though.


Illustration by Michelle Urvall Nyren

His collection was very neutral and very beige/grey/brown. The use of fabrics generally reserved for womenswear was a promising idea but wasn’t used to a great effect. The semi-opaque trousers and jacket/dress were fun but I expected more from someone who defines themselves on their use of simplicity, tailoring and well styled masculinity. I did however, love the army boots which were worn with every outfit including the smarter tailored suits.


Illustration by Gareth A Hopkins

Elson Figueiredo is inspired by 19th century European carnies and uses 100% organic fair-trade cottons. He presented a really strong collection with nicely tailored jackets, mid length coats and loose fit chino-esque trousers. His self-description of ‘quirky and distinctive’ is perfect. The jackets are well cut and the added elbow pads and red edgings on pockets and lapels were definitely a bonus for me in terms of well thought through details.


The beige knee length coat worn with characteristic edging details was the highlight of the show for me, and slightly different from all of the other pieces he sent down the runway.

The star of the show (kept till last) was Florian Jayet. I really enjoyed his collection and many influences were prevalent in his styling – he interned with Alexander McQueen. Jayet’s S/S 2011 collection is inspired by insects and armour style garments. Mainly white, black and silver his pieces were futuristic yet very of the moment with sculptured shoulders, padding and defining shapes.


Using metallic fabrics and leather, his robust exoskeleton pieces are often softened with a long draped skirt or a flimsy top. Also, again with the noticing of the hair, I like the sharp pulled back ponytails sported by all the models.


My ones to watch are definitely Figueiredo and Jayet. They presented collections with distinctive yet restrained looks rather than over designing pieces a la River Island chic.

All photography by Florence Masssey


Illustration by Zarina Liew

Hermione de Paula is known for her distinctive screen printing; using hand drawn, pill painted and embroidered elements she creates beautifully intricate and complex floral textures.  Her website describes the signature style of the label as romantic and sultry, viagra buy sexually charged yet nonchalant and feminine with a twist. The irresistible philosophy in life of Hermione’s girl is ‘I probably shouldn’t, this site but I will anyway’. If that doesn’t entice you to explore her collections then I don’t know what will. 

Hermione’s collections are always centered around a female figure; her debut collection was named ‘I heart Elizabeth Berkley’ and took inspiration from the film Showgirls.  A/W 2010 was entitled ‘Polly Crystalline’and featured fabrics printed with pearlised, crystallized and frozen flowers.


Illustration by Zarina Liew

S/S 2011 sees de Paula focussing upon ‘the sexual awakening of Flora, the goddess of flowers’.  Garments were layered and fluid; sheer printed silks and chiffon were embroidered loosely with gossamery wisps of cashmere and mohair, adding to the weightless movement of the pieces.  The palette consisted of the delicate muted pink and mauve hues of petals, contrasting with indigo, taupe and black. 






Photographs courtesy Hermione de Paula

Assymetric hems gave a contemporary feel to the collection, along with unfinished, fraying collars and translucent panelling. 

So far it sounds very feminine and demure, but on second glance, the flowing floral prints included unexpected hidden details – dry, wilted blooms, octopus tentacles, thistles, blackbirds and ghostly stems and branches.  

In contrast to the fluttering layers, fraying denim was used to create neckpieces, ankle cuffs, belts and Macramé overskirts. Chunky black crocheted vests, silk shorts and flimsy printed camisoles with denim halternecks were just seen under blouses and dresses.  


Illustration by Zarina Liew

The looks were finished with ankle socks in black, taupe and nude, worn with chunky geometric heels by Nicholas Kirkwood.  Hermione is currently working on print consultancy with luxury shoe designer Kirkwood, as well as collaborating with Browns Focus to produce bespoke pieces. Plenty to look out for…

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One Response to “London Fashion Week S/S 2011 Catwalk Review: Hermoine de Paula”

  1. Sue says:

    This is what fashion is about! I really appreciated seeing Hermoine de Paula’s, Christopher Kane and Ekrelius’ collections. Thats summer pieces I look forward to wear. X Sue

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