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Top 25 Art Blog - Creative Tourist

London Fashion Week S/S 2011 On Schedule Womenswear Preview, Part Two: The Pioneers

In our second London Fashion Week S/S 2011 preview, Jemma Crow makes her pick of the stalwarts of the London Fashion Week circuit, who season after season deliver the goods - Betty Jackson, Margaret Howell, PPQ, Jaeger and Pringle…

Written by Jemma Crow


Shambala 2010

The costumes have been returned to their dressing up boxes; the mud has dried out and been brushed from the boots; newly-learned dance workshop moves have become vague; reality has crept back into view… The Shambala Festival has packed itself away for another year – and, page my oh my, site what an incredible time it was.

Shambala is a 3-day voyage of discovery. Yes, stomach there’s a programme – and an impressive one at that – featuring acts and activities as diverse as chant-arousing Dizraeli & The Small Gods on the main Shambala stage, the jaw-dropping Cirque de Freq in the Kamikaze tent, min-beast safaris in the Permaculture garden and the Cock Drawing Club in the Random Workshop Tent. But the most magical Shambala experience is a haphazard one, in which the clocks stop and the concept of time is snubbed as punters follow their ears, noses and tapping toes into the most thrilling and unexpected of entertainments.

The Compass House of Lunacy
Noémie Ducimetière creeps out The Compass House of Lunacy

Wandering Word
Poet Rosie Carrick in the Wandering Word yurt

Bewitching bewilderment was the lifeblood of the Compass House of Lunacy, in which the ghosts of French songstresses (Noémie Ducimetière) and high-kicking, be-corseted madams ruled the stage. Just around the corner, the Wandering Word yurt beckoned dazed punters into its cosy folds to have their ears tickled by pirate poets and their imaginations led through eerie worlds summoned by storytelling eccentrics.

Shambala parade

Shambala parade_Picture Frames

Shambala Parade_Gorilla

After Friday’s inaugural explorations and familiarisations, on Saturday Shambala donned its gladrags and revelled in magnificent peculiarities and with newfound friends. For Saturday was the festival’s official fancy dress day (not that that prevented costumes from coming out to play all weekend…), and was topped by the spectacular Shambala parade.

Permaculture Garden

Shambala crazy golf

Didgeridoo
Shambala blows: Getting down with the didgeridoo

Peeping over the debauched brow of Saturday night, Shambala’s Sunday air was thick with drowsiness as the festival rubbed the night before from its eyes, picking up lost wellies, rogue headdress feathers and the first few threads of the real world. It was on Sunday that the Healing Area really came into its own, offering to knead the weariness from revellers’ muscles, revive their vocal chords in the Music & Voice workshops and fix them a jolly good old cup of chai to nestle between their crossed legs as they flanked the crackling camp fire.

Shambala dragon

Site and house

So, there’s a whole year until Shambala returns. Will it be the same? Of course not, and that’s exactly why we’ll love it. Expect the unexpected – and in the meantime keep the Shambala spirit of discovery alive by forgetting your watch every once in a while…


Shambala 2010

The costumes have been returned to their dressing up boxes; the mud has dried out and been brushed from the boots; newly-learned dance workshop moves have become vague; reality has crept back into view… The Shambala Festival has packed itself away for another year – and, medical my oh my, what an incredible time it was.

Shambala is a 3-day voyage of discovery. Yes, there’s a programme – and an impressive one at that – featuring acts and activities as diverse as chant-arousing Dizraeli & The Small Gods on the main Shambala stage, the jaw-dropping Cirque de Freq in the Kamikaze tent, min-beast safaris in the Permaculture garden and the Cock Drawing Club in the Random Workshop Tent. But the most magical Shambala experience is a haphazard one, in which the clocks stop and the concept of time is snubbed as punters follow their ears, noses and tapping toes into the most thrilling and unexpected of entertainments.

The Compass House of Lunacy
Noémie Ducimetière creeps out The Compass House of Lunacy

Wandering Word
Poet Rosie Carrick in the Wandering Word yurt

Bewitching bewilderment was the lifeblood of the Compass House of Lunacy, in which the ghosts of French songstresses (Noémie Ducimetière) and high-kicking, be-corseted madams ruled the stage. Just around the corner, the Wandering Word yurt beckoned dazed punters into its cosy folds to have their ears tickled by pirate poets and their imaginations led through eerie worlds summoned by storytelling eccentrics.

Shambala parade

Shambala parade_Picture Frames

Shambala Parade_Gorilla

After Friday’s inaugural explorations and familiarisations, on Saturday Shambala donned its gladrags and revelled in magnificent peculiarities and with newfound friends. For Saturday was the festival’s official fancy dress day (not that that prevented costumes from coming out to play all weekend…), and was topped by the spectacular Shambala parade.

Permaculture Garden

Shambala crazy golf

Didgeridoo
Shambala blows: Getting down with the didgeridoo

Peeping over the debauched brow of Saturday night, Shambala’s Sunday air was thick with drowsiness as the festival rubbed the night before from its eyes, picking up lost wellies, rogue headdress feathers and the first few threads of the real world. It was on Sunday that the Healing Area really came into its own, offering to knead the weariness from revellers’ muscles, revive their vocal chords in the Music & Voice workshops and fix them a jolly good old cup of chai to nestle between their crossed legs as they flanked the crackling camp fire.

Shambala dragon

Site and house

So, there’s a whole year until Shambala returns. Will it be the same? Of course not, and that’s exactly why we’ll love it. Expect the unexpected – and in the meantime keep the Shambala spirit of discovery alive by forgetting your watch every once in a while…


London Fashion Week, page photographed by Matt Bramford

As always at London Fashion Week there are the new and innovative designers we are told to watch……but let’s not forget the stalwarts that need no such introduction. They’ve shown at London Fashion Week for seasons (more than some would like to say) but always know how to please the audience, visit this so here’s our pick of the legends…

Betty Jackson

Betty Jackson A/W 2010, website illustrated by Gemma Randall

After seeing the show last year at LFW its clear that Betty Jackson, having nearly 30 years experience in the business, knows how to design for the everyday woman. Showcasing an array of tarnished gold pieces and full dirndl skirts; the materials seem to juxtapose each other as Jackson mixed heavy wool coats and corduroy accessories with the aforementioned “liquid tarnished gold” skirts and blouses. Let’s hope that her SS collection continues to play on the womanly trends that made her pieces flatter the female figure this Autumn Winter.

Margaret Howell

Margaret Howell A/W 2010, illustrated by Natsuki Otani

Another dab hand having been on the fashion scene for almost four decades this is a designer with experience dressing both the male and female form. Margaret Howell‘s SS11 collection is a step on from last year but still plays on the “beach stripes and loose fit” ideology of her summer look. Describing the Howell woman as someone who is independent and discerning it’ll be no surprise when Howell creates a contemporary collection that still plays on the quality she is renowned for.

PPQ

PPQ A/W 2010, illustrated by Paolo Caravello

Believe it or not Amy Molyneaux and Percy Parker (aka PPQ) were the inspiration behind us all wearing skinny jeans and the Amy Winehouse/Pete Doherty looks that spawned a decade of copycats. Better know by their fashion pseudonym and with an army of celebrity followers (Rihanna, Alexa Chung and Daisy Lowe amongst many) they’ve been in the business since 1992 and certainly know their stuff. Their A/W 2010 collection featured a cotillion of graphic print and there’s always a very nostalgic feel to their looks; something of the graphic cartoon mixed with Joan Collins in Dynasty. Maybe that’s just me though. Expect big things from their S/S 2011 look; its one for “Sophia Loren in a rush with Peter Sellers in tow.”

Jaeger London

Jaeger A/W 2010, illustrated by Stéphanie Thieullent

Such a grown up retailer like Jaeger that still knows how to impress the younger clientele as well as appealing to their heritage customers. This SS11 collection will be a nod to artistic movements; namely Modernism (confronting condition), Surrealism (juxtaposition of surprise elements) and Minimalism (simplicity in art). With these elements Stuart Stokdale, Design Director, has created “cohesive collection” fused from all of the above and inspired by the cream of London’s art gallery crop.

Pringle of Scotland

Pringle of Scotland A/W 2010, illustrated by Maria del Carmen Smith

More recently Pringle have been best known for their celebrity collaborations with, well everyone, from Tilda Swinton to David Beckham and even Madonna. Their traditional Scottish production is still a big selling part of the brand but long gone is the traditional twin set. Last year saw a quiet emergence of colour within the summer Resort collection upon a theme of minimalist chic. Let’s see what this summer has to bring.

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One Response to “London Fashion Week S/S 2011 On Schedule Womenswear Preview, Part Two: The Pioneers”

  1. [...] is from Betty Jackson’s collection for Amelia’s Magazine’s online coverage of London Fashion Week. This entry was posted in Commissions, Drawing, Editorial. [...]

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