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Top 25 Art Blog - Creative Tourist

London Fashion Week S/S 2011: The FAD Junior Awards (again)

My account of this heartwarming awards ceremony from the charity that gives kids the confidence to get into fashion… Am I too old to sign up?

Written by Matt Bramford


Illustration by Joana Faria

Nearing the end of fashion week, salve visit this site everyone begins to look forward to a little light relief and a break from running from venue to venue – maybe some music, a bit of dancing and a drink or two? The Tatty Devine party ticked all the boxes and added an abundance of their snazzy jewelery to oogle at.

Held in their Covent Garden store on Monmouth Street, there was a lively crowd from seven onwards mixing those who had turned up for the party, with the people spilling out from nearby pubs and bars. The Severed Limb were playing on and off with my favourite member playing something which when I asked, was told (in an its-matter-of-fact-way), that it was the wash board.

So…the dulcet tones of the washboard, the bass, and the accordion accompanied the Can Do dancers from Pineapple Studios. With their amazing ruffled, flared skirts and Tatty Devine jewellery the party was literally jumping by 8 o’clock. Western themed jewellery matched the music with fringed necklaces, brooches, horseshoe earrings and cowboy boot charms.


Illustration by Joana Faria

I have always enjoyed the quirkiness of Tatty Devine jewellery and their new pieces do not let the brand down. The moustache and pipe rings are great, as are the famous name tag necklaces and the pom pom earrings Amelia spotted when she popped down later. Rifling through my goodie bag, I was delighted to find a pipe ring included – definite style win.

We’ve always been fans of Tatty Devine and I was pleased to see that they are still going strong with their collaborations. At the moment, Rob Ryan jewellery (who collaborated with us for our second issue) is available from their online store as well as in Covent Garden. Other designers they are working with include Mrs Jones and Gilbert & George.




Illustration by Joana Faria

Nearing the end of fashion week, nurse everyone begins to look forward to a little light relief and a break from running from venue to venue – maybe some music, a bit of dancing and a drink or two? The Tatty Devine party ticked all the boxes and added an abundance of their snazzy jewellery to oogle at.

Held in their Covent Garden store on Monmouth Street, there was a lively crowd from seven onwards mixing those who had turned up for the party, with the people spilling out from nearby pubs and bars. The Severed Limb were playing on and off with my favourite member playing something which when I asked, was told (in an its-matter-of-fact-way), that it was the wash board.

So…the dulcet tones of the washboard, the bass, and the accordion accompanied the Can Do dancers from Pineapple Studios. With their amazing ruffled, flared skirts and Tatty Devine jewellery the party was literally jumping by 8 o’clock. Western themed jewellery matched the music with fringed necklaces, brooches, horseshoe earrings and cowboy boot charms.


Illustration by Joana Faria

I have always enjoyed the quirkiness of Tatty Devine jewellery and their new pieces do not let the brand down. The moustache and pipe rings are great, as are the famous name tag necklaces and the pom pom earrings Amelia spotted when she popped down later. Rifling through my goodie bag, I was delighted to find a pipe ring included – definite style win.

We’ve always been fans of Tatty Devine and I was pleased to see that they are still going strong with their collaborations. At the moment, Rob Ryan jewellery (who collaborated with us for our second issue) is available from their online store as well as in Covent Garden. Other designers they are working with include Mrs Jones and Gilbert & George.




Illustration by Joana Faria

Nearing the end of fashion week, this site everyone begins to look forward to a little light relief and a break from running from venue to venue – maybe some music, recipe a bit of dancing and a drink or two? The Tatty Devine party ticked all the boxes and added an abundance of their snazzy jewellery to oogle at.

Held in their Covent Garden store on Monmouth Street, there was a lively crowd from seven onwards mixing those who had turned up for the party, with the people spilling out from nearby pubs and bars. The Severed Limb were playing on and off with my favourite member playing something which when I asked, was told (in an its-matter-of-fact-way), that it was the wash board.

So…the dulcet tones of the washboard, the bass, and the accordion accompanied the Can Do dancers from Pineapple Studios. With their amazing ruffled, flared skirts and Tatty Devine jewellery, the party was literally jumping by 8 o’clock. Western themed jewellery matched the music with fringed necklaces, brooches, horseshoe earrings and cowboy boot charms.


Illustration by Joana Faria

I have always enjoyed the quirkiness of Tatty Devine jewellery and their new pieces do not let the brand down. The moustache and pipe rings are great, as are the famous name tag necklaces and the pom pom earrings Amelia spotted when she popped down later. Rifling through my goodie bag, I was delighted to find a pipe ring included – definite style win.

We’ve always been fans of Tatty Devine and I was pleased to see that they are still going strong with their collaborations. At the moment, Rob Ryan jewellery (who collaborated with us for our second issue) is available from their online store as well as in Covent Garden. Other designers they are working with include Mrs Jones and Gilbert & George.




Illustration by Andrea Peterson

As part of Designers Remix, shop designer Charlotte Eskildsen, discount who is creative director of the enterprise published their signature collection last week. After winning the prestigious Danish Design Guldknappen award she has become a force to be reckoned with in international fashion since starting the line in 2002. Her S/S 2011 collection ‘Liquid Sky’ is inspired by cloud formations.

Draped fabrics. Origami folds. A flash orange dress. Scraped back hair tied in tight knots. The show, diagnosis held in the Portico rooms was one of my favourites of the week. Like many others, it stuck strongly to a muted colour range, beginning with pieces in greys, creams and blacks. Small details like the delicate lace insets and just-seen underskirts pulled the collection together extremely well.

Charlotte’s skill lies in how well she collects the fabric together and makes it hang. Ruffles on the shoulders of her cream dresses are restrained and kept from looking fussy, the great bright orange dress (which I desperately want) is understated in all other ways bar the colour and the waterfall collars on the jackets carried the theme of softness through even on heavier fabrics.


Illustration by Andrea Peterson

The clothes ranged from smart black dresses, to sand toned wafty jackets and ruffled party frocks in various shades of cream. This is a collection that is just good. I can’t put my finger on an exact feature or piece that puts it into a higher category for me and I think that’s why I like it.

More than just a wearable summer collection, it mars together a floaty casual look with added details of specialness without being over the top. If I wanted to sound very fashiony I would call it perfect ‘understated chic’, but hopefully I’ve described it better than that!


Illustration by Katie Harnett

This post is being written nine days after Kinder Aggugini’s Africa inspired show. There was a lot of this lazy naming of inspiration being banded around the press releases this season – it sappears the majority of designers forget that Africa is not simply Africa but a complex continent subdivided via colonial rule and consisting of multiple languages and cultures. But for the purposes of Fashion Africa it has been relegated to Tiger skins and “super fantastic” Safari outfits. For a supposidly fashion forward industry; fashion is (un)surprisingly chained to particular ideas of wealth and escapism.

Illustration by Gemma Randall

It was not ‘Africa’ which inspired Kinder but a European idea of Africa, information pills an idea which often fills the pages of Vogue’s distasteful summer fashion shoots of caucasian models in ‘Colonial Explorer’ inspired outfits striding the Safari. In a twist for a Spring Summer collection inspired by Africa, price the catwalk featured Linen Jackets with trousers to match alongside simple shift dresses. The most exciting thing that appeared on the catwalk were the cardboard hats made by the fantastic Stephen Jones.

Fashion survives and feeds on escapist desires, Dior encapsulated a sense of jubilance with his “New Look” after years of rationing. Whether you want to or not we buy into the idea that what we wear is a projection of our opinions. As a result an entire industry (the High Street,the Ateliers and the Fashion Press) has developed to transform ideas created on the catwalk into the trends currently seen dominating shop window displays. Suddenly have an urge to feel like a pre-Second World War pilot? Then why not buy the Burberry inspired aviator jacket?

Since Kinder’s show, London has finished, Milan began and ended and Paris is in the process of starting. The month of Spring Summer Fashion is drawing to a close. Trend spotters and bloggers waiting eagle eyed for a clue to what we will all be wearing next season, will have already produced trend forecasted. The main problem, lies not with the designers such has Kinder Aggugini who are transcribing their inspiration into garments, but with the increasing dislocation between clothes and the wearer. Fast Fashion means you can be one look tomorrow and another look tomorrow, the result at the moment is the constant plundering of the 70′s aesthetic. Perhaps, in these straightened times, the loss of ‘simpler’ times are being mourned?

Illustration by Katie Harnett

This post is being written nine days after Kinder Aggugini’s Africa inspired show. There was a lot of this lazy naming of inspiration being bandied around the press releases this season – it appears the majority of designers forget that Africa is not simply Africa but a complex continent subdivided via colonial rule and consisting of multiple languages and cultures. But for the purposes of Fashion Africa it has been relegated to Tiger skins and “super fantastic” Safari outfits. For a supposedly fashion forward industry; fashion is (un)surprisingly chained to particular ideas of wealth and escapism.

Illustration by Gemma Randall

It was not ‘Africa’ which inspired Kinder but a European idea of Africa, physician an idea which often fills the pages of Vogue’s distasteful summer fashion shoots of caucasian models in ‘Colonial Explorer’ inspired outfits striding the Safari. In a twist for a Spring Summer collection inspired by Africa, more about the catwalk featured Linen Jackets with trousers to match alongside simple shift dresses. The most exciting thing that appeared on the catwalk were the cardboard hats made by the fantastic Stephen Jones.

Fashion survives and feeds on escapist desires, Dior encapsulated a sense of jubilance with his “New Look” after years of rationing. Whether you want to or not we buy into the idea that what we wear is a projection of our opinions. As a result an entire industry (the High Street,the Ateliers and the Fashion Press) has developed to transform ideas created on the catwalk into the trends currently seen dominating shop window displays. Suddenly have an urge to feel like a pre-Second World War pilot? Then why not buy the Burberry inspired aviator jacket?

Since Kinder’s show, London has finished, Milan began and ended and Paris is in the process of starting. The month of Spring Summer Fashion is drawing to a close. Trend spotters and bloggers waiting eagle eyed for a clue to what we will all be wearing next season, will have already produced trend forecasted. The main problem, lies not with the designers such as Kinder Aggugini who are transcribing their inspiration into garments, but with the increasing dislocation between clothes and the wearer. Fast Fashion means you can be one look tomorrow and another look tomorrow, the result at the moment is the constant plundering of the 70′s aesthetic. Perhaps, in these straightened times, the loss of ‘simpler’ times are being mourned?

Illustration by Katie Harnett

This post is being written nine days after Kinder Aggugini’s ‘Africa’ inspired show. This season there was a lot of this lazy naming of inspiration being bandied around the press releases – it appears designers forget Africa is not simply ‘Africa’ but a complex continent subdivided via colonial rule and consisting of multiple languages and cultures. But for the purposes of Fashion Africa it has been relegated to Tiger skins and “super fantastic” Safari outfits. For a supposedly fashion forward industry; fashion is (un)surprisingly chained to particular ideas of wealth and escapism.

Illustration by Gemma Randall

It was not ‘Africa’ which inspired Kinder but a European idea of Africa, prescription an idea which often fills the pages of Vogue’s distasteful summer fashion shoots of caucasian models in ‘Colonial Explorer’ inspired outfits striding the Safari. In a twist for a Spring Summer collection inspired by Africa, try the catwalk featured Linen Jackets with trousers to match alongside simple shift dresses. The most exciting thing that appeared on the catwalk were the cardboard hats made by the fantastic Stephen Jones.

Fashion survives and feeds on escapist desires, pills Dior encapsulated a sense of jubilance with his “New Look” after years of rationing. Whether you want to or not we buy into the idea that what we wear is a projection of our opinions. As a result an entire industry (the High Street,the Ateliers and the Fashion Press) has developed to transform ideas created on the catwalk into the trends currently seen dominating shop window displays. Suddenly have an urge to feel like a pre-Second World War pilot? Then why not buy the Burberry inspired aviator jacket?

Since Kinder’s show, London has finished, Milan began and ended and Paris is in the process of starting. The month of Spring Summer Fashion is drawing to a close. Trend spotters and bloggers waiting eagle eyed for a clue to what we will all be wearing next season, will have already produced trend forecasted. The main problem, lies not with the designers such as Kinder Aggugini who are transcribing their inspiration into garments, but with the increasing dislocation between clothes and the wearer. Fast Fashion means you can be one look tomorrow and another look tomorrow, the result at the moment is the constant plundering of the 70′s aesthetic. Perhaps, in these straightened times, the loss of ‘simpler’ times are being mourned?


Illustration by Joana Faria

On Tuesday night Amelia, approved myself and Zandra Rhodes met at the Freemason’s Hall to attend the FAD Junior Fashion Awards. Well, advice Zandra was there, adiposity across the catwalk, she didn’t technically ARRIVE with us. We’d been invited by email: an email that was gushing in gratitude for the work we had done to support this charity. I am ashamed to admit that I didn’t have a clue what this lovely lady was talking about – there’s so much good stuff on here that I occasionally miss the odd article. But Fran from FAD was happy, and I was to attend!

The usual beginning ensued – I quiverred in the background having forgotten my ticket while Amelia dragged me by the arm, kicking and screaming, onto the front row. I have to say that I am finally starting to get used to all this and by the A/W 2012 shows I’ll be poised at the front of the queues, shoulders back, sunglasses on, marching to the front.

The Freemason’s was absolutely boiling as always (please sort some air conditioning out for next year, VFS!). In fact, somebody should have supplied fans in goodie bags. Imagine! You could show bin bags covered in sh*t and people would say nice things if you kept them cool.

Fashion Awareness Direct (FAD) are a charity who work with young people to give them the confidence to get into fashion. Where do I sign up?! One of last year’s students, Prash Muraleetharan, delivered the most inspirational speech that I was almost in tears, and the show hadn’t even started. Amelia and I scrambled to write down what he had said. All this before we’d seen a single badly made dressed or batiked skirt (as I imagined).


Illustration by Aniela Murphy

Amelia and I continually remarked throughout the show about how young these budding designers were. I can honestly say that there was very little difference between this show and those on the BFC catwalk (you know, the on-schedule one that is supposedly the creme-de-la-creme of current British fashion).

You can read Amelia’s full report here. I couldn’t make head nor tail of who was who – the looks appeared, the names changed so quickly, and the running order was in the wrong order. AND, to top it off, it was impossible to take pictures because a certain somebody kept telling me off for getting in the way. Tehe.

This year’s theme had been inspired by the Medieval and Renaissance Galleries at the V&A, which was evident on the catwalk, but not in a typically student way by any means. When the theme was announced, before the show, I thought ‘Oh hear we go – cue silly headgear and bucket top boots’. No such thing – the inspiration had been handled with such sophistication that it acted as a discrete point of reference rather than a fancy dress theme.

So to the winners. The winning collection was David Short’s medieval emerald number, crowning him the first boy ever to scoop the coveted prize.


Illustration by Aniela Murphy

My favourite was Andre Augusto’s body-con number with exaggerated sleeves and strap detail – an Alexander McQueen in the making.

Sarah Kilkenny’s simple a-line dress with rope detail scooped the Award for Research.

Karmen-Marie Parker burst into tears when Zandra Rhodes (my Zandra) presented her with the award for Commercial Innovation – her sports-luxe denim creation had real style.

A totally inspirational show, which reduced me to tears and left me reeling. In amongst all the ridiculous ludicrousness of fashion week, this was the perfect antidote.

Oh do pop over to Amelia’s review because she’s far more diligent than I am and has listed all the other fabulous youngsters and their creations – and has more gratuitous shots of MY Zandra for your delectation. Oh and here’s a video, in which you can probably see me blubbing somewhere on the left…

Photography by Amelia Gregory and Matt Bramford

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One Response to “London Fashion Week S/S 2011: The FAD Junior Awards (again)”

  1. [...] Check out whole article on Amelia’s Magazine. [...]

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