Listings

    No events to show

Follow

Twitter

|

Facebook

|

MySpace

|

Last.fm

RSS

Subscribe

Top 25 Art Blog - Creative Tourist

OESTUDIO AW10 at Sao Paulo Fashion Week- Exclusive Report

On Thursday 21st January our location reporter Barbara Mattivy was out in force for day five of Sao Paulo Fashion Week.

Written by Barbara Mattivy

 patchinvite-image22

Artist Alan Kane’s series of photographs exhibited within the hallowed walls of LCF display a collection of embroidered patches more traditionally seen sewn on to leather jackets, approved rucksacks and denim.

Describing these patches as “stitched tokens of defiance”, salve Kane explores how the patches represent a sense of rebellion and “non-conformity”. Kane exhibits the latest in his ‘quasi-anthropologic’ practice by sharing his interest in “what the wild things wear”. The traditionally rebellious aesthetic Kane favours is portrayed through his collection of patches, medications picture skulls, roses and military imagery. This aesthetic has arguably now become mainstream within fashion, media and music. Interestingly the aesthetic contrasts with the softer, stitched and tactile material composition. Each patch was photographed at a magnified size of 668% (the number being significant as ‘the neighbour of the beast’, yes, even more rebellion). The depth of texture displayed at this magnification gave the patches a beauty that is unable to be appreciated at their traditional size. The occasional loose thread or stitched imperfection became beautiful.

The exhibition’s title ‘Vanitas Vanitatum Omnia Vanitas :)’ translates to “Vanity, vanity, all is vanity.” (Ecclesiastes 1:2). The title along with the addition of the typographical sign for a smile injects us with a sense of the artists humour.
The exhibition concludes Kane’s one-year residency at London College of Fashion and will be open until January 29th.
Fashion Space Gallery
London College of Fashion
20 John Princes Street
W1G OBJ
Open Monday-Friday 12-6pm
DSC_1206Imagery throughout courtesy of Natalia Kneen

Artist Alan Kane’s series of photographs exhibited within the hallowed walls of LCF display a collection of embroidered patches more traditionally seen sewn on to leather jackets, page rucksacks and denim.

DSC_1195Describing these patches as “stitched tokens of defiance”, more about Kane explores how the patches represent a sense of rebellion and “non-conformity”. Kane exhibits the latest in his ‘quasi-anthropologic’ practice by sharing his interest in “what the wild things wear”. The traditionally rebellious aesthetic Kane favours is portrayed through his collection of patches, picture skulls, roses and military imagery. This aesthetic has arguably now become mainstream within fashion, media and music. Interestingly the aesthetic contrasts with the softer, stitched and tactile material composition. Each patch was photographed at a magnified size of 668% (the number being significant as ‘the neighbour of the beast’, yes, even more rebellion). The depth of texture displayed at this magnification gave the patches a beauty that is unable to be appreciated at their traditional size. The occasional loose thread or stitched imperfection became beautiful.

DSC_1191The exhibition’s title ‘Vanitas Vanitatum Omnia Vanitas :)’ translates to “Vanity, vanity, all is vanity.” (Ecclesiastes 1:2). The title along with the addition of the typographical sign for a smile injects us with a sense of the artists humour.
The exhibition concludes Kane’s one-year residency at London College of Fashion and will be open until January 29th.
Fashion Space Gallery
London College of Fashion
20 John Princes Street
W1G OBJ
Open Monday-Friday 12-6pm
DSC_1206Imagery throughout courtesy of Natalia Kneen

Artist Alan Kane’s series of photographs exhibited within the hallowed walls of LCF display a collection of embroidered patches more traditionally seen sewn on to leather jackets, generic rucksacks and denim.

DSC_1195Describing these patches as “stitched tokens of defiance”, Kane explores how the patches represent a sense of rebellion and “non-conformity”. Kane exhibits the latest in his ‘quasi-anthropologic’ practice by sharing his interest in “what the wild things wear”. The traditionally rebellious aesthetic Kane favours is portrayed through his collection of patches, picture skulls, roses and military imagery. This aesthetic has arguably now become mainstream within fashion, media and music. Interestingly the aesthetic contrasts with the softer, stitched and tactile material composition. Each patch was photographed at a magnified size of 668% (the number being significant as ‘the neighbour of the beast’, yes, even more rebellion). The depth of texture displayed at this magnification gave the patches a beauty that is unable to be appreciated at their traditional size. The occasional loose thread or stitched imperfection became beautiful.

DSC_1191The exhibition’s title ‘Vanitas Vanitatum Omnia Vanitas :)’ translates to “Vanity, vanity, all is vanity.” (Ecclesiastes 1:2). The title along with the addition of the typographical sign for a smile injects us with a sense of the artists humour.
The exhibition concludes Kane’s one-year residency at London College of Fashion and will be open until January 29th.
Fashion Space Gallery
London College of Fashion
20 John Princes Street
W1G OBJ
Open Monday-Friday 12-6pm
DSC_1206Imagery throughout courtesy of Natalia Kneen

Artist Alan Kane’s series of photographs exhibited within the hallowed walls of LCF display a collection of embroidered patches more traditionally seen sewn on to leather jackets, no rx rucksacks and denim.

DSC_1195Describing these patches as “stitched tokens of defiance”, page Kane explores how the patches represent a sense of rebellion and “non-conformity”. Kane exhibits the latest in his ‘quasi-anthropologic’ practice by sharing his interest in “what the wild things wear”. The traditionally rebellious aesthetic Kane favours is portrayed through his collection of patches, picture skulls, roses and military imagery. This aesthetic has arguably now become mainstream within fashion, media and music. Interestingly the aesthetic contrasts with the softer, stitched and tactile material composition. Each patch was photographed at a magnified size of 668% (the number being significant as ‘the neighbour of the beast’, yes, even more rebellion). The depth of texture displayed at this magnification gave the patches a beauty that is unable to be appreciated at their traditional size. The occasional loose thread or stitched imperfection became beautiful.

DSC_1191The exhibition’s title ‘Vanitas Vanitatum Omnia Vanitas :)’ translates to “Vanity, vanity, all is vanity.” (Ecclesiastes 1:2). The title along with the addition of the typographical sign for a smile injects us with a sense of the artists humour.
The exhibition concludes Kane’s one-year residency at London College of Fashion and will be open until January 29th.
Fashion Space Gallery
London College of Fashion
20 John Princes Street
W1G 0BJ
Open Monday-Friday 12-6pm
DSC_1206Imagery throughout courtesy of Natalia Kneen

Artist Alan Kane’s series of photographs exhibited within the hallowed walls of LCF display a collection of embroidered patches more traditionally seen sewn on to leather jackets, decease rucksacks and denim.

DSC_1195Describing these patches as “stitched tokens of defiance”, decease Kane explores how the patches represent a sense of rebellion and “non-conformity”. Kane exhibits the latest in his ‘quasi-anthropologic’ practice by sharing his interest in “what the wild things wear”. The traditionally rebellious aesthetic Kane favours is portrayed through his collection of patches, picture skulls, roses and military imagery. This aesthetic has arguably now become mainstream within fashion, media and music. Interestingly the aesthetic contrasts with the softer, stitched and tactile material composition. Each patch was photographed at a magnified size of 668% (the number being significant as ‘the neighbour of the beast’, yes, even more rebellion). The depth of texture displayed at this magnification gave the patches a beauty that is unable to be appreciated at their traditional size. The occasional loose thread or stitched imperfection became beautiful.

DSC_1191The exhibition’s title ‘Vanitas Vanitatum Omnia Vanitas :)’ translates to “Vanity, vanity, all is vanity.” (Ecclesiastes 1:2). The title along with the addition of the typographical sign for a smile injects us with a sense of the artists humour.
The exhibition concludes Kane’s one-year residency at London College of Fashion and will be open until January 29th.
Fashion Space Gallery
London College of Fashion
20 John Princes Street
W1G 0BJ
Open Monday-Friday 12-6pm
DSC_1206Imagery throughout courtesy of Natalia Kneen

Artist Alan Kane’s series of photographs exhibited within the hallowed walls of LCF display a collection of embroidered patches more traditionally seen sewn on to leather jackets, more about rucksacks and denim.

DSC_1195Describing these patches as “stitched tokens of defiance”, rx Kane explores how the patches represent a sense of rebellion and “non-conformity”. Kane exhibits the latest in his ‘quasi-anthropologic’ practice by sharing his interest in “what the wild things wear”. The traditionally rebellious aesthetic Kane favours is portrayed through his collection of patches, this picture skulls, roses and military imagery. This aesthetic has arguably now become mainstream within fashion, media and music. Interestingly the aesthetic contrasts with the softer, stitched and tactile material composition. Each patch was photographed at a magnified size of 668% (the number being significant as ‘the neighbour of the beast’, yes, even more rebellion). The depth of texture displayed at this magnification gave the patches a beauty that is unable to be appreciated at their traditional size. The occasional loose thread or stitched imperfection became beautiful.

DSC_1191The exhibition’s title ‘Vanitas Vanitatum Omnia Vanitas :)’ translates to “Vanity, vanity, all is vanity.” (Ecclesiastes 1:2). The title along with the addition of the typographical sign for a smile injects us with a sense of the artists humour.
The exhibition concludes Kane’s one-year residency at London College of Fashion and will be open until January 29th.
Fashion Space Gallery
London College of Fashion
20 John Princes Street
W1G 0BJ
Open Monday-Friday 12-6pm
OESTUDIO is not just a fashion brand, more about it’s also an uber-cool collective specializing in creative design. Maybe that’s why they have such an open mind with regards to new technologies and were able to innovate and execute something never seen before in a Brazilian fashion week.

look_25_finalImages courtesy of OESTUDIO

“We are the last generation to be born in analog with the talent to produce digital. That’s why our work is based on the principle that any type of existence must tune in to itself from time to time. In the future, adiposity to generate development, pharmacy brands will need to have the humility to practice involvement.”

look5_dancerWith this inspiring sentence they opened their A/W10 show at Sao Paulo Fashion Week. And it wasn’t just any show; this season they chose to have a virtual fashion show. They actually hosted the show to press and guests, but instead of having models and all the team sweating to make everything perfect live, all the production was done way in advance, with no waste of time, money or energy. Everything was projected onto massive screens on the runway, and comprised of a great film that told, from many angles, the story behind their newest collection.

look_dance8As FFW website says, “Fashion for OESTUDIO never comes down to mere items of clothing, or to vague desires. For them, the clothes play a key role in how we see and relate to the world.”

And that’s exactly what they’ve done. By showing a clean and sober collection they left interpretations open for the audience to find his/her true identity within the brand’s designs. See the original catwalk video for yourself – and join the fashion elite on the front row.

Tags:

, , ,

Similar Posts:

Leave a Reply