Amelia’s Magazine | SpeedArting: the art of seduction

Thumb
The Cinematic Orchestra were playing on the laptop. With the rain petering down outside, erectile the tarmac awash with its newfound uninhabitable river, viagra I opened the enormous wooden door and peered outside. I didn’t want to go and rush away with the stream of no return. I wanted to stay here, treat with him. His jeans were baggy and beautiful, his carpet pulled at the soles of my tights. I left. To Build A Home faded.

Cinematic Orchestra by Matilde Sazio

Man With A Movie Camera Illustration by Matilde Sazio

Walking back along the slippery treadmill of road I made no effort to shelter from the swiping blankets of droplets. My brow furrowed and my eyes looked up as I stood at the top of the hill and looked at the sea from left to right, my heart taking my breath away. Unquestionably gluttonous for punishment I fell into my room and To Build A Home was alive again. I was confused. I was in love.

Dawn by The Cinematic Orchestra is on and i’m walking to the beach, with a cider and baguette in my backpack. It’s a beautiful sunny day and the strings mix with the birds as I feel my eyes glint in the harmony of the simplicity of now. Of this love sitting against the wall.

The Royal Albert Hall Karina Yarv

The Royal Albert Hall Illustration by Karina Yarv

I’m at The Royal Albert Hall, Breathe by The Cinematic Orchestra is playing live. The London Metropolitan Orchestra are stationed and moving with fierce precision. The circle envelops me, I look and he smiles. I peer the miles down from our sectioned box and I see Heidi Vogel is about to unleash and pour her voice over the hall again. She does it slowly and blends with the instruments before together they gallop and circulate the grand hall, swirling us up in a haze of stunning sound.

Heidi Vogel by Matilde Sazio

Heidi Vogel, Illustration by Matilde Sazio

The Cinematic Orchestra in their live form are impressive and encapsulating. Like tablets of emotion, they use their prowess to orchestrate and leave impressions upon the many. They were formed in 1999 by Jason Swinscoe. A Ninja Tune employee, he arrived in South London from Scotland, via Yorkshire and Cardiff. With a love of jazz bass players, rhythm sections and film soundtracks he worked on The Cinematic Orchestra in his own time. After getting together a group of jazz players, he delivered the debut album, ‘Motion’, on the Ninja Tune. It was considered the perfect soundtrack to the dangerous bar, the femme fatale, the hero and the dead, with throbbing riffs, repeated loops and instrumental phrases. It’s music on tenterhooks, awaiting the next explosion of this, that and everything.

HelsLights

The Cinematic Orchestra tracks certainly sound as though they have been lifted from a gorgeous, very visual film, yet of course these films do not exist. That is, they didn’t until their first film soundtrack came along in the shape of ‘Man With A Movie Camera’. In 1999. Swinscoe was asked by the organisers of the Porto European City of Culture 2000 if the band wanted to score a silent movie to open the celebrations. The film was Dziga Vertov’s ‘Man With A Movie Camera’, a 1929 early documentary cinema film from the Soviet Union, focusing on the daily life of an average worker. The work made the band think about unwrapping musical narratives slowly, combing sounds and textures. Influencing ‘Every Day’, the ‘Man With A Movie Camera’ album was released in 2003, on Ninja Tune. ‘Every Day’ was The Cinematic Orchestra’s second album, released again on Ninja Tune. With ten minute tunes, like ‘All Things to All Men’, they experimented with softly, softly orchestra mixed with moody deep notes. Swinscoe worked with bass player, Phil France on this album and enlisted the talents of Roots Manuva and modern Jazz legend, Luke Flowers.

‘Ma Fleur’ on Ninja Tune, is the band’s latest album, released in 2007, and features To Build A Home, as well as Breathe and Child Song. It feels very refined and yet sporadic in its waterfall outbursts of music. Adding to their film credentials, The Cinematic Orchestra also recorded the soundtrack to the Disneynature film The Crimson Wing: Mystery of the Flamingos in 2008. They also released; Live At The Royal Albert Hall in 2008, on Ninja Tune, after their last performance at the prestigious Hall.

stage1

Listening to their music in such a venue can only be described as very special. It is one of those ‘nothing and yet everything matters right now’ moments. You are right there with every note, engulfed in a hall, reverberating in the clarity the sounds produce. It is difficult not to be moved by the rising and falling emotions, the burst of the strings, the flowing piano. The serene and yet momentous feeling. So what an earth can it be like to actually be on that stage, and play at The Royal Albert Hall, so steeped in grandeur, beauty and respect? I asked Heidi Vogel some questions about this after her incredible performance.

What was it like performing at The Royal Albert Hall last night?
It was a night I will never forget.  Performing at the Albert Hall,  on that beautiful stage,  and in such a beautiful space,  looking out to a sea of people filling the entire hall to its fullest capacity, is an experience unlike anything else.

Helsrah

What was the best moment for you?
Standing at the side of the stage waiting to come onto the stage for my first vocal of the evening, which was on ‘Burn Out’. I was so excited to come onto the stage and join in with the Orchestra, to be part of the music that was being made. I was standing there, all ready and the Orchestra had come in for the beginning of Ivo’s piano solo. It was such a moving moment in the music, and I felt my hairs standing up hearing it being played like that with The London Metropolitan Orchestra. It was really something so special.

How does the RAH compare to other venues around the world? Where in the world have you loved performing?
Well RAH can’t be compared to anywhere in the world,  it is so completely special and unique. I have played on many wonderful stages that I loved, and RAH is unique among them all. We have played in Sete in France in the open air Roman Amphitheatre on the sea, and lovely outdoor stages such as in Toronto Harbourfront, or Milan Jazz Festival, The Big Chill, Fuji Rock,  and many beautiful theatres, festivals and countries that we loved.

roof

This night was Ninja Tune’s 20th birthday, Ninja Tune XX. They celebrated with the band that produces real and imaginary film soundtracks, formed in the minds of people whose lives they have run beside. Without an actual film, the music lends itself to whatever narrative you bestow upon it. To me obviously, this has allowed me to wallow in my own sadness and skip in ecstasy (ha!) But to see The Cinematic Orchestra live was to feel the elation of an evening comprising of a huge range of talented musicians, performing beautifully. It was a night to rejoice in the achievement of humans producing descriptive and emotive sound that mirrors and acknowledges life in all its forms and idiosyncrasies.

The Cinematic Orchestra were playing on the laptop. With the rain petering down outside, physician the tarmac awash with its newfound uninhabitable river, I opened the enormous wooden door and peered outside. I didn’t want to go and rush away with the stream of no return. I wanted to stay here, with him. His jeans were baggy and beautiful, his carpet pulled at the soles of my tights. I left. To Build A Home faded.

Cinematic Orchestra by Matilde Sazio

Man With A Movie Camera Illustration by Matilde Sazio

Walking back along the slippery treadmill of road I made no effort to shelter from the swiping blankets of droplets. My brow furrowed and my eyes looked up as I stood at the top of the hill and looked at the sea from left to right, my heart taking my breath away. Unquestionably gluttonous for punishment I fell into my room and To Build A Home was alive again. I was confused. I was in love.

Dawn by The Cinematic Orchestra is on and i’m walking to the beach, with a cider and baguette in my backpack. It’s a beautiful sunny day and the strings mix with the birds as I feel my eyes glint in the harmony of the simplicity of now. Of this love sitting against the wall.

The Royal Albert Hall Karina Yarv

The Royal Albert Hall Illustration by Karina Yarv

I’m at The Royal Albert Hall, Breathe by The Cinematic Orchestra is playing live. The London Metropolitan Orchestra are stationed and moving with fierce precision. The circle envelops me, I look and he smiles. I peer the miles down from our sectioned box and I see Heidi Vogel is about to unleash and pour her voice over the hall again. She does it slowly and blends with the instruments before together they gallop and circulate the grand hall, swirling us up in a haze of stunning sound.

Heidi Vogel by Matilde Sazio

Heidi Vogel, Illustration by Matilde Sazio

The Cinematic Orchestra in their live form are impressive and encapsulating. Like tablets of emotion, they use their prowess to orchestrate and leave impressions upon the many. They were formed in 1999 by Jason Swinscoe. A Ninja Tune employee, he arrived in South London from Scotland, via Yorkshire and Cardiff. With a love of jazz bass players, rhythm sections and film soundtracks he worked on The Cinematic Orchestra in his own time. After getting together a group of jazz players, he delivered the debut album, ‘Motion’, on the Ninja Tune. It was considered the perfect soundtrack to the dangerous bar, the femme fatale, the hero and the dead, with throbbing riffs, repeated loops and instrumental phrases. It’s music on tenterhooks, awaiting the next explosion of this, that and everything.

HelsLights

The Cinematic Orchestra tracks certainly sound as though they have been lifted from a gorgeous, very visual film, yet of course these films do not exist. That is, they didn’t until their first film soundtrack came along in the shape of ‘Man With A Movie Camera’. In 1999. Swinscoe was asked by the organisers of the Porto European City of Culture 2000 if the band wanted to score a silent movie to open the celebrations. The film was Dziga Vertov’s ‘Man With A Movie Camera’, a 1929 early documentary cinema film from the Soviet Union, focusing on the daily life of an average worker. The work made the band think about unwrapping musical narratives slowly, combing sounds and textures. Influencing ‘Every Day’, the ‘Man With A Movie Camera’ album was released in 2003, on Ninja Tune. ‘Every Day’ was The Cinematic Orchestra’s second album, released again on Ninja Tune. With ten minute tunes, like ‘All Things to All Men’, they experimented with softly, softly orchestra mixed with moody deep notes. Swinscoe worked with bass player, Phil France on this album and enlisted the talents of Roots Manuva and modern Jazz legend, Luke Flowers.

‘Ma Fleur’ on Ninja Tune, is the band’s latest album, released in 2007, and features To Build A Home, as well as Breathe and Child Song. It feels very refined and yet sporadic in its waterfall outbursts of music. Adding to their film credentials, The Cinematic Orchestra also recorded the soundtrack to the Disneynature film The Crimson Wing: Mystery of the Flamingos in 2008. They also released; Live At The Royal Albert Hall in 2008, on Ninja Tune, after their last performance at the prestigious Hall.

stage1

Listening to their music in such a venue can only be described as very special. It is one of those ‘nothing and yet everything matters right now’ moments. You are right there with every note, engulfed in a hall, reverberating in the clarity the sounds produce. It is difficult not to be moved by the rising and falling emotions, the burst of the strings, the flowing piano. The serene and yet momentous feeling. So what an earth can it be like to actually be on that stage, and play at The Royal Albert Hall, so steeped in grandeur, beauty and respect? I asked Heidi Vogel some questions about this after her incredible performance.

What was it like performing at The Royal Albert Hall last night?
It was a night I will never forget.  Performing at the Albert Hall,  on that beautiful stage,  and in such a beautiful space,  looking out to a sea of people filling the entire hall to its fullest capacity, is an experience unlike anything else.

Helsrah

What was the best moment for you?
Standing at the side of the stage waiting to come onto the stage for my first vocal of the evening, which was on ‘Burn Out’. I was so excited to come onto the stage and join in with the Orchestra, to be part of the music that was being made. I was standing there, all ready and the Orchestra had come in for the beginning of Ivo’s piano solo. It was such a moving moment in the music, and I felt my hairs standing up hearing it being played like that with The London Metropolitan Orchestra. It was really something so special.

How does the RAH compare to other venues around the world? Where in the world have you loved performing?
Well RAH can’t be compared to anywhere in the world,  it is so completely special and unique. I have played on many wonderful stages that I loved, and RAH is unique among them all. We have played in Sete in France in the open air Roman Amphitheatre on the sea, and lovely outdoor stages such as in Toronto Harbourfront, or Milan Jazz Festival, The Big Chill, Fuji Rock,  and many beautiful theatres, festivals and countries that we loved.

roof

This night was Ninja Tune’s 20th birthday, Ninja Tune XX. They celebrated with the band that produces real and imaginary film soundtracks, formed in the minds of people whose lives they have run beside. Without an actual film, the music lends itself to whatever narrative you bestow upon it. To me obviously, this has allowed me to wallow in my own sadness and skip in ecstasy (ha!) But to see The Cinematic Orchestra live was to feel the elation of an evening comprising of a huge range of talented musicians, performing beautifully. It was a night to rejoice in the achievement of humans producing descriptive and emotive sound that mirrors and acknowledges life in all its forms and idiosyncrasies.

Thumb

The Cinematic Orchestra were playing on the laptop. With the rain petering down outside, approved the tarmac awash with its newfound uninhabitable river, I opened the enormous wooden door and peered outside. I didn’t want to go and rush away with the stream of no return. I wanted to stay here, with him. His jeans were baggy and beautiful, his carpet pulled at the soles of my tights. I left. To Build A Home faded.

Cinematic Orchestra by Matilde Sazio

Man With A Movie Camera Illustration by Matilde Sazio

Walking back along the slippery treadmill of road I made no effort to shelter from the swiping blankets of droplets. My brow furrowed and my eyes looked up as I stood at the top of the hill and looked at the sea from left to right, my heart taking my breath away. Unquestionably gluttonous for punishment I fell into my room and To Build A Home was alive again. I was confused. I was in love.

Dawn by The Cinematic Orchestra is on and i’m walking to the beach, with a cider and baguette in my backpack. It’s a beautiful sunny day and the strings mix with the birds as I feel my eyes glint in the harmony of the simplicity of now. Of this love sitting against the wall.

The Royal Albert Hall Karina Yarv

The Royal Albert Hall Illustration by Karina Yarv

I’m at The Royal Albert Hall, Breathe by The Cinematic Orchestra is playing live. The London Metropolitan Orchestra are stationed and moving with fierce precision. The circle envelops me, I look and he smiles. I peer the miles down from our sectioned box and I see Heidi Vogel is about to unleash and pour her voice over the hall again. She does it slowly and blends with the instruments before together they gallop and circulate the grand hall, swirling us up in a haze of stunning sound.

Heidi Vogel by Matilde Sazio

Heidi Vogel, Illustration by Matilde Sazio

The Cinematic Orchestra in their live form are impressive and encapsulating. Like tablets of emotion, they use their prowess to orchestrate and leave impressions upon the many. They were formed in 1999 by Jason Swinscoe. A Ninja Tune employee, he arrived in South London from Scotland, via Yorkshire and Cardiff. With a love of jazz bass players, rhythm sections and film soundtracks he worked on The Cinematic Orchestra in his own time. After getting together a group of jazz players, he delivered the debut album, ‘Motion’, on the Ninja Tune. It was considered the perfect soundtrack to the dangerous bar, the femme fatale, the hero and the dead, with throbbing riffs, repeated loops and instrumental phrases. It’s music on tenterhooks, awaiting the next explosion of this, that and everything.

HelsLights

The Cinematic Orchestra tracks certainly sound as though they have been lifted from a gorgeous, very visual film, yet of course these films do not exist. That is, they didn’t until their first film soundtrack came along in the shape of ‘Man With A Movie Camera’. In 1999. Swinscoe was asked by the organisers of the Porto European City of Culture 2000 if the band wanted to score a silent movie to open the celebrations. The film was Dziga Vertov’s ‘Man With A Movie Camera’, a 1929 early documentary cinema film from the Soviet Union, focusing on the daily life of an average worker. The work made the band think about unwrapping musical narratives slowly, combing sounds and textures. Influencing ‘Every Day’, the ‘Man With A Movie Camera’ album was released in 2003, on Ninja Tune. ‘Every Day’ was The Cinematic Orchestra’s second album, released again on Ninja Tune. With ten minute tunes, like ‘All Things to All Men’, they experimented with softly, softly orchestra mixed with moody deep notes. Swinscoe worked with bass player, Phil France on this album and enlisted the talents of Roots Manuva and modern Jazz legend, Luke Flowers.

‘Ma Fleur’ on Ninja Tune, is the band’s latest album, released in 2007, and features To Build A Home, as well as Breathe and Child Song. It feels very refined and yet sporadic in its waterfall outbursts of music. Adding to their film credentials, The Cinematic Orchestra also recorded the soundtrack to the Disneynature film The Crimson Wing: Mystery of the Flamingos in 2008. They also released; Live At The Royal Albert Hall in 2008, on Ninja Tune, after their last performance at the prestigious Hall.

stage1

Listening to their music in such a venue can only be described as very special. It is one of those ‘nothing and yet everything matters right now’ moments. You are right there with every note, engulfed in a hall, reverberating in the clarity the sounds produce. It is difficult not to be moved by the rising and falling emotions, the burst of the strings, the flowing piano. The serene and yet momentous feeling. So what an earth can it be like to actually be on that stage, and play at The Royal Albert Hall, so steeped in grandeur, beauty and respect? I asked Heidi Vogel some questions about this after her incredible performance.

What was it like performing at The Royal Albert Hall last night?
It was a night I will never forget.  Performing at the Albert Hall,  on that beautiful stage,  and in such a beautiful space,  looking out to a sea of people filling the entire hall to its fullest capacity, is an experience unlike anything else.

Helsrah

What was the best moment for you?
Standing at the side of the stage waiting to come onto the stage for my first vocal of the evening, which was on ‘Burn Out’. I was so excited to come onto the stage and join in with the Orchestra, to be part of the music that was being made. I was standing there, all ready and the Orchestra had come in for the beginning of Ivo’s piano solo. It was such a moving moment in the music, and I felt my hairs standing up hearing it being played like that with The London Metropolitan Orchestra. It was really something so special.

How does the RAH compare to other venues around the world? Where in the world have you loved performing?
Well RAH can’t be compared to anywhere in the world,  it is so completely special and unique. I have played on many wonderful stages that I loved, and RAH is unique among them all. We have played in Sete in France in the open air Roman Amphitheatre on the sea, and lovely outdoor stages such as in Toronto Harbourfront, or Milan Jazz Festival, The Big Chill, Fuji Rock,  and many beautiful theatres, festivals and countries that we loved.

roof

This night was Ninja Tune’s 20th birthday, Ninja Tune XX. They celebrated with the band that produces real and imaginary film soundtracks, formed in the minds of people whose lives they have run beside. Without an actual film, the music lends itself to whatever narrative you bestow upon it. To me obviously, this has allowed me to wallow in my own sadness and skip in ecstasy (ha!) But to see The Cinematic Orchestra live was to feel the elation of an evening comprising of a huge range of talented musicians, performing beautifully. It was a night to rejoice in the achievement of humans producing descriptive and emotive sound that mirrors and acknowledges life in all its forms and idiosyncrasies.

The Cinematic Orchestra were playing on the laptop. With the rain petering down outside, help the tarmac awash with its newfound uninhabitable river, cialis 40mg I opened the enormous wooden door and peered outside. I didn’t want to go and rush away with the stream of no return. I wanted to stay here, pilule with him. His jeans were baggy and beautiful, his carpet pulled at the soles of my tights. I left. To Build A Home faded.

Cinematic Orchestra by Matilde Sazio

Man With A Movie Camera Illustration by Matilde Sazio

Walking back along the slippery treadmill of road I made no effort to shelter from the swiping blankets of droplets. My brow furrowed and my eyes looked up as I stood at the top of the hill and looked at the sea from left to right, my heart taking my breath away. Unquestionably gluttonous for punishment I fell into my room and To Build A Home was alive again. I was confused. I was in love.

Dawn by The Cinematic Orchestra is on and i’m walking to the beach, with a cider and baguette in my backpack. It’s a beautiful sunny day and the strings mix with the birds as I feel my eyes glint in the harmony of the simplicity of now. Of this love sitting against the wall.

The Royal Albert Hall Karina Yarv

The Royal Albert Hall Illustration by Karina Yarv

I’m at The Royal Albert Hall, Breathe by The Cinematic Orchestra is playing live. The London Metropolitan Orchestra are stationed and moving with fierce precision. The circle envelops me, I look and he smiles. I peer the miles down from our sectioned box and I see Heidi Vogel is about to unleash and pour her voice over the hall again. She does it slowly and blends with the instruments before together they gallop and circulate the grand hall, swirling us up in a haze of stunning sound.

Heidi Vogel by Matilde Sazio

Heidi Vogel, Illustration by Matilde Sazio

The Cinematic Orchestra in their live form are impressive and encapsulating. Like tablets of emotion, they use their prowess to orchestrate and leave impressions upon the many. They were formed in 1999 by Jason Swinscoe. A Ninja Tune employee, he arrived in South London from Scotland, via Yorkshire and Cardiff. With a love of jazz bass players, rhythm sections and film soundtracks he worked on The Cinematic Orchestra in his own time. After getting together a group of jazz players, he delivered the debut album, ‘Motion’, on the Ninja Tune. It was considered the perfect soundtrack to the dangerous bar, the femme fatale, the hero and the dead, with throbbing riffs, repeated loops and instrumental phrases. It’s music on tenterhooks, awaiting the next explosion of this, that and everything.

HelsLights

The Cinematic Orchestra tracks certainly sound as though they have been lifted from a gorgeous, very visual film, yet of course these films do not exist. That is, they didn’t until their first film soundtrack came along in the shape of ‘Man With A Movie Camera’. In 1999. Swinscoe was asked by the organisers of the Porto European City of Culture 2000 if the band wanted to score a silent movie to open the celebrations. The film was Dziga Vertov’s ‘Man With A Movie Camera’, a 1929 early documentary cinema film from the Soviet Union, focusing on the daily life of an average worker. The work made the band think about unwrapping musical narratives slowly, combing sounds and textures. Influencing ‘Every Day’, the ‘Man With A Movie Camera’ album was released in 2003, on Ninja Tune. ‘Every Day’ was The Cinematic Orchestra’s second album, released again on Ninja Tune. With ten minute tunes, like ‘All Things to All Men’, they experimented with softly, softly orchestra mixed with moody deep notes. Swinscoe worked with bass player, Phil France on this album and enlisted the talents of Roots Manuva and modern Jazz legend, Luke Flowers.

‘Ma Fleur’ on Ninja Tune, is the band’s latest album, released in 2007, and features To Build A Home, as well as Breathe and Child Song. It feels very refined and yet sporadic in its waterfall outbursts of music. Adding to their film credentials, The Cinematic Orchestra also recorded the soundtrack to the Disneynature film The Crimson Wing: Mystery of the Flamingos in 2008. They also released; Live At The Royal Albert Hall in 2008, on Ninja Tune, after their last performance at the prestigious Hall.

stage1

Listening to their music in such a venue can only be described as very special. It is one of those ‘nothing and yet everything matters right now’ moments. You are right there with every note, engulfed in a hall, reverberating in the clarity the sounds produce. It is difficult not to be moved by the rising and falling emotions, the burst of the strings, the flowing piano. The serene and yet momentous feeling. So what an earth can it be like to actually be on that stage, and play at The Royal Albert Hall, so steeped in grandeur, beauty and respect? I asked Heidi Vogel some questions about this after her incredible performance.

What was it like performing at The Royal Albert Hall last night?
It was a night I will never forget.  Performing at the Albert Hall,  on that beautiful stage,  and in such a beautiful space,  looking out to a sea of people filling the entire hall to its fullest capacity, is an experience unlike anything else.

Helsrah

What was the best moment for you?
Standing at the side of the stage waiting to come onto the stage for my first vocal of the evening, which was on ‘Burn Out’. I was so excited to come onto the stage and join in with the Orchestra, to be part of the music that was being made. I was standing there, all ready and the Orchestra had come in for the beginning of Ivo’s piano solo. It was such a moving moment in the music, and I felt my hairs standing up hearing it being played like that with The London Metropolitan Orchestra. It was really something so special.

How does the RAH compare to other venues around the world? Where in the world have you loved performing?
Well RAH can’t be compared to anywhere in the world,  it is so completely special and unique. I have played on many wonderful stages that I loved, and RAH is unique among them all. We have played in Sete in France in the open air Roman Amphitheatre on the sea, and lovely outdoor stages such as in Toronto Harbourfront, or Milan Jazz Festival, The Big Chill, Fuji Rock,  and many beautiful theatres, festivals and countries that we loved.

roof

This night was Ninja Tune’s 20th birthday, Ninja Tune XX. They celebrated with the band that produces real and imaginary film soundtracks, formed in the minds of people whose lives they have run beside. Without an actual film, the music lends itself to whatever narrative you bestow upon it. To me obviously, this has allowed me to wallow in my own sadness and skip in ecstasy (ha!) But to see The Cinematic Orchestra live was to feel the elation of an evening comprising of a huge range of talented musicians, performing beautifully. It was a night to rejoice in the achievement of humans producing descriptive and emotive sound that mirrors and acknowledges life in all its forms and idiosyncrasies.


All illustrations by Sean Lennon and Charlotte Kemp Muhl

The Ghost of a Saber Tooth Tiger is very much the sonic embodiment of its band members. Sean Lennon and Charlotte Kemp Muhl are intrigued by everything around them and distill this into the music that they make, diagnosis like two wide-eyed innocents, holding each others hands and trying to make sense of the wonders and absurdities of life with the aide of a couple of mics and a multitude of instruments. Their recently released new album Acoustic Sessions (which can be brought here) acts as the perfect showcase for their union as both musical and romantic collaborators. Sean and Charlotte duet together on every track; her voice is as delicate as a thimble and rings clear as a bell, a perfect addition to Sean’s deeper timbre (which interestingly, has the slightest trace of a Liverpudlian burr to it when he sings). The songs are whimsical without being twee, and while they pay homage to 60′s folk-pop, there is no element of pastiche.

My hour spent with Sean and Charlotte on their whistle-stop touchdown in London was an illuminating peek into the high-octane lifestyle of two very in-demand individuals. While most of our music interviews take place in make-shift back stage areas, this interview is conducted 22 floors up at the William Morris Agency housed in London’s Centre Point Building. The plush meeting room offers sweeping views across Central London. Managers and PR’s field incoming emails and update schedules on ever buzzing Blackberries, but thankfully Sean and Charlotte seem unaffected by the surrounding melee. The first surprise of the morning comes when they reveal that the print version of Amelia’s Magazine was one of their favourite publications. “We’ve read almost every single issue!” exclaims Sean as Charlotte explains that their sound engineer on Acoustic Sessions introduced them to us and subsequently, the Amelia’s Magazine issues were the go-to reading material as the album was recorded.

As abstract as one of their self-designed illustrations, the interview takes the form of a free flowing stream of consciousness with Sean and Charlotte finishing off one another’s sentences and thoughts. (Their website wasn’t wrong when it wrote that The GOASTT work from one heart despite having two separate minds). While it wasn’t the typical Q+A that I was anticipating, it was way more fun – and fascinating – to touch on topics such as geodesic domes, Bauhaus, Buckminster Fuller, synesthesia, the phallic stature of city buildings, and what this represents in society – over to Sean on this one: “Joseph Campbell says if you look at the history of architecture you can see what the value system of society was like. The idea is that whatever the biggest object in your city is, is what you care about the most. In the beginning of civilization it was your hut i.e your home; in the middle ages we had churches as our spiritual centers and now the biggest buildings are banks, so it shows that we worship money now.” As seemingly random as the threads of conversation were at the time, looking back over my notes I could see that it’s all part of Sean and Charlottes conviction that everything is connected; art, music, culture; so why not question and draw inspiration from what’s around us?

While Sean has had both a solo career and been involved in other bands, The GOASTT seems like his most personal endeavor to date. “It’s the work that I’m most excited about having done since I’ve met Charlotte” he says. Sean’s musical lineage is well documented, but Charlotte is somewhat of an unknown force. I asked her about her background. “I had written a lot of folk music”, she explained, “but it wasn’t for commercial purposes. I was travelling a lot when I was younger doing modelling and at that point my only companion was a guitar.” With no firm musical direction, she abandoned her music, but when she met Sean she found her inspiration, and received a crash course in Sean’s prolific record collection. “Folk and classical music was my only background, and Sean was a rolodex of so many different musical genres; he played me so much music that I had never heard of and it just blew my mind.” Sean reminisces about the first time he heard Charlotte’s music; “She kept it a secret that she played at all and I found it very mysterious. She had written all these songs and didn’t tell me till we had been dating for a year, and then she played them to me and I was like: ‘wow’…….. ” Joining forces, they embarked on an outpouring of work. “We wrote, like, 50 songs quickly. There was a lot of chemistry, not just in our relationship but creatively.” Charlotte is quick to praise Sean’s musical versatility: “I think Sean is so schizophrenic musically because he’s so talented. I’ve heard him playing so many styles, from folk, to funk, to..” “To flunk”, chimes in Sean helpfully, “that’s funk and folk combined”. (Is it? I need to do some research on this).

We talk about the nature of the album, and the fact that it’s entirely acoustic (the clue’s in the title). “It’s funny”, says Sean, “because someone asked us if this record was a concept album, and it’s not per se, except that there is one concept which is that we wanted to do everything on the record by just the two of us – no one else plays on it – and all the instruments are non electrical.” I remark that all of their performances feature a lot of instruments being used; guitars, cymbals, melodicas and xylophones are laid around Sean’s and Charlotte’s feet, ready to be picked up and played. “The record that you hear is very much live” confirms Sean, “and in order to recreate that live we had to figure out how to multi-task with our instruments which makes the show a lot more exciting for us – although I don’t know if it does for the audience!” (FYI, their set at The Roundhouse Studio on the following night was seamless and very well received).

Their days are currently filled up with gigs around the globe, most of the time performing strictly as The GOASTT, or occasionally pulling in musical friends of theirs. If that doesn’t keep them busy enough, the band is housed by their own record label, Chimera Music which they run from their home in New York. Also signed to Chimera is his mother Yoko’s group; The Plastic Ono Band, of which Sean is musical director. (Sean and Charlotte had come to London by way of Iceland, where he was overseeing the Plastic Ono Band gig, held in honour of what would have been John Lennon’s 70th birthday). All in all, it’s been an incredibly busy and productive year for Sean and Charlotte, and while their schedule seems to verge on the absurd, they are keeping a cool head. “It’s a good time, an inspiring time for us”, Sean assures me, and on the basis of Acoustic Sessions, I can believe this.


By Daniel Williams

Maybe theres something in the air, more about maybe its my age or maybe its the season but it seems everybody around me has suddenly spawned. Friends have started to have babies, viagra approved and family members are producing them faster than I can count them.


By Michelle Urvall Nyren

I am also a little south of skint, so my meagre craft skills have come in pretty handy. I recently made a baby mobile out of stuff lying around my flat. It was easy, free and convenient , so I thought I’d show you how to make one.

You’ll need:

Wire coat hanger
Fabric (I used an old running t shirt, denim cut offs, and some other fabric I had lying around)
Ribbon, if you have any
Scissors
Glue
Buttons (Optional)

Firstly, bend a wire coat hanger into a circle. Easier said than done. I found that laying it on the table and beating it into submission with a hard object worked best. Wrap some thin strips of fabric around the wire coat hanger, using a dab of glue every few wraps to secure it.

To make the part that will attach to the ceiling, plait 3 strips of fabric 3 times. Then attach the three plaited strips evenly around the fabric covered wire frame, using glue or a staple or a few stitches.

Cut your strips of ribbon and fabric to the same width and length, then fold the top of each strip of fabric around the fabric covered wire frame, using a dab of glue to secure each strip.
To make sure none of the lengths of ribbon fall from the frame, you could also add a few stitches to each strip too.

Baby Mobile Finished
Baby Mobile Finished

This is easy enough to encourage little hands to help you do it, as I did with my creation above. I fashioned the wire and plaited the three strips that attach to the ceiling, and my little assistent attached the individual strips to the frame. You could neaten it by hemming the fabric, or using only ribbon, or keep it rough and ready. Parents will appreciate the time you put into it and babies will love the colours and the way it moves. And, more importantly, it doesn’t add to the inevitable pile of growing tacky plastic crap, either. Winner.

This column attempts to provide lovely ways to recycle junk into useful and beautiful things. If you have a genius recycling idea or if you are stuck with something you don’t want to chuck away, leave a comment and let me know! I may feature your idea or I will try and come up with a solution to your recycling conundrum.

Illustration by Daria Hlazatova

Fashion illustration. You may have noticed we get pretty excited about the genre, nurse particularly with Amelia’s new book on the way. Drawing Fashion at the Design Museum has been hotly anticipated and it doesn’t let down. Put together by Joelle Chariau of Galerie Bartsch & Chariau over 30 years, viagra the show covers fashion illustration from the early 20th century forward. The present installment at the Design Museum is the first time the collection has been shown together.

The quick overview: the show captures the power of illustration to reflect not only the fashion but also the tone of the times, for sale in a way unique to other media forms such as photography. It proves that although photography has become the predominant media from the 1930s, illustration still holds a valid and special place in fashion. 


George Lepape

The longer version: split into five eras, the exhibit focuses the viewer to the changing role of fashion illustration and its connection to the culture it is a part of. The first, From Gold to Silver 1910-29, captures the optimism and new worldviews of the early 20th century with bold use of colours, a new vibrancy and a focus on lifestyle in the illustrations. The single figures of Erté, the Vogue and La Gazette du Bon Ton George Lepape covers bring out the new silhoette of the 1920s. Stylised illustrations celebrate the lifestyles that few could afford, but which encapsulate post war enthusiasm. The highlight here: George Lepape’s Chapeaux D’Hiver for Le Bon Ton in pen, ink and watercolour, showing both the original and use in editorial. 

Moving forward to 1930-46, the tone of Time & Decay reflects the changing times: the depression, the movement of focus from Paris to America during the war years, the popularity of the cinema and a focus on leisure and sportswear in fashion. This more casual tone is brought through the illustration, with looser strokes, more muted colours and more introspective compositions. This section highlights the talent of Bernard Blossac and René Bouché


René Gruau

Enthusiasm returns in New Rhythms, New Rules 1947-59, introducing Dior‘s ‘New Look‘ in 1947. The illustrations of Réne Gruau perfectly capture the ‘exagerated elegance’ of Dior’s bold new style. His bold use of colour and line, with a predominance of red, white, back and orchre shine through this section of the exhibit. The timelessness of the illustrations is highlighted by a Vogue Paris cover illustration, first published in the 1950s, republished for the Juin/Juillet 1985 edition, that would look equally contemporary today. Another highlight is a single pink glove, showing a movement from full figure to individual detail and objects of the body. 


Antonio Lopez

The true star of the show is Antonio (Lopez), the sole focus of Liberty & Licence, taking the viewer through 1960-89. Anotonio’s bold graphics in pencil and watercolour celebrate the dynamic feminism of the 1970s and especially the 1980s. This is power illustration to the max, matching the era’s power dressing with big shoulders, tight waists and attitudes to match. Hitting the mood of each decade, Antonio’s style adapts through the 1960s-80s, with a focus on form and art. 


François Berthoud

The exhibit concludes with The Tradition Continues 1990-2010 and Fashion Drawing for the Future. The illustrations chosen in this section react against ‘the cult of the individual’ and big budget commerciality of fashion and advertising. Matts Gustafson and François Berthoud show new paths forward in terms of form and technique. Berthoud’s Allure de Chanel for Rebel, France (enamel on paper) reduces the figure to positive and negative forms.


Mats Gustafson

Overall, illustrations are more moody and suggestive and are often simplified to form, colour and movement. An Aurore de la Morinere for Christian Lacroix published in Süddeutsche Zeitung Magazine loses the form of figure and clothes to a shimmer of colours, becoming etherial and fantasy rather than any depiction of the body. A dark illustration for Alexander McQueen with the figure walking away from the viewer and displayed alone poignently reminds of the loss of this fashion great. 

There is currently a resurgence of interest in fashion illustration and Drawing Fashion celebrates this. With any retrospective, it’s difficult to cover everything and there are a few illustrators missing – notably David Downton who we interviewed recently. The exhibition, however, demonstrates illustration’s power to take the viewer beyond the simple display of clothes and connecting what we wear with the mood, ideologies and changing tides of the 20th century.

Get all the information you need, including the line up of talks associated with the exhibition, in our listings section.
Gemma Milly Speedarting

SpeedArting by Gemma Milly.

So I’ve spent an hour getting ready. I’ve gone for a little black dress, viagra 40mg bird necklace and black shu-boos, for sale and am heading out to Stone Horse Paper Cow on Bishopsgate. As I draw nearer the anticipation rises and I can feel my heart beating faster. Why does this always happen when you’re about to meet some potential totty?

But this is no ordinary date, oh no, I’m about to arrive at an altogether more intriguing rendez-vous. Tonight, with my best-friend at my side, I am going SpeedArting. There is every possibility that I will still meet a dark and handsome stranger, the only difference is that he’ll be hanging on my wall rather than off my every word (as I’m sure they always do). And none of the ‘I’m not ready to have a relationship’ after a few dates to put up with. Hurrah!

Victoria Topping - Illustrator

‘Gesamtkunstwerk’ by Victoria Topping.

Brainchild of Jody Kingzett, Photographer who has snapped the likes of Dame Helen Mirren and Naomi Campbell, and who I met two years ago on a photoshoot in the freezing cold in Southwark, the concept is so simple that I’m surprised no-one has thought of it before. In a nutshell, it’s all about matchmaking you, the public ,with affordable art, in quirky locations – think Sketch Parlour not Slug and Lettuce (thank the lord!). So hats off to Jody for spotting a niche and hop, skip and jumping right into it.

Illustration by Darren Cranmer

Illustration by Darren Cranmer.

Amongst the artists that will be exhibiting and selling their wares this Wednesday are Neha Mojaria, who produces street-art style canvasses with a fashion twist, Illustrator Victoria Topping who creates surreal music-based illustrations, and Darren Cranmer who’s illustration style is sublimely delicate and atmospheric. Not to mention the man himself – Jody Kingzett.

Meha Mojaria - Artist

Painting by artist Meha Mojaria.

The next SpeedArting event is this Wednesday November 24th at Stone Horse Paper Cow, and promises to be a festive one. What better antidote to a tiring day in the office than to grab your friends and head out for a spot of high-brow Christmas shopping, with a free drink thrown in? So if you fancy being part of the newest big thing to hit the London art scene, make sure www.speedarting.com is firmly at the top of your bookmarks, and follow SpeedArting on Facebook or twitter. Who knows, you might bag yourself a nice little bit of eye candy.

Categories ,Affordable, ,Bishopsgate, ,Christmas Presents, ,Dame Helen Mirren, ,Darren Cranmer, ,fashion, ,Gemma Milly, ,illustration, ,Jody Kingzett, ,Naomi Campbell, ,Neha Mojaria, ,painting, ,photography, ,Sketch Parlour, ,Speed Dating, ,Speedarting, ,Stone Horse Paper Cow, ,street art, ,Victoria Topping

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Amelia’s Magazine | Supershorts International Film Festival 08

The supershorts film festival has been running for five years, and celebrates both the art of short films and those who make them. I’ve always been a bit of a geek about shorts, mainly because I’ve been making them for three years. Although I studied journalism, I have the secret desire to work in film and was a bit of a ‘groupie’ at uni, volunteering to be on almost every shoot, ever. So it’s always a treat to watch new shorts and spot the upcoming talent. I only managed to catch one night of the festival, but it was a brilliant and inspiring night of screenings at the Odeon in Shaftsbury Avenue, Covent Garden. Here are a few highlights:

A Difference in Shadow by Michael Mier was a beautifully shot and emotional piece with a nice little twist in the tale. Great performances from both Sakib Salama and Georgia Baines, which brought a shiver to the spine and brought to the surface how easy it is to assume.

michael%20mier.jpg

Broken by Vicky Psarias – a great little narrative piece which began more like a feature than a short, and felt as if it could, and perhaps should, go on. The story shows a Cypriot family immigrating to London to join their father who has already been preparing for a better life for them. But it turns out he doesn’t seem to have their best interests at heart. It had potential, but lacked punch in the final blow.

broken%20vicky%20psarias.jpg

Eric’s Secrets by Lucia Ashmore is a poignant documentary based solely on character on not much else -and that’s why it works. Eric, in his nineties, talks about his life with beautiful humour and wisdom, and this film went on to win the Lightning Media Best Documentary Award.

eric%27s%20secrets%20film.jpg

For the Love of God by Joe Tucker provided some light relief – and also a change in format, as it’s a stop-motion animation. Main character Graham lives in a Christian bookshop with his overbearing mother and pet jackdaw. We follow him as his quest for faith takes on a macabre spin. Featuring the voices of Steve Coogan and Sir Ian McKellan, it’s a fantastic piece with just the right dose of humour and shock tactics.

For%20Love%20of%20God.jpg

Joystick by Kevin Richards, another animation, is a thoughtful and beautifully drawn piece showing two joined beings ‘The Joystick’ whirl and twist through life, eventually split apart by conflict. Without each other, they perish in a tragic ending.

joystick.jpg

‘Flushed‘ by Martin Stirling is a brilliantly funny piece about a boy caught short in the loos. Great characters and great production values, it’s the Director’s first funded short and he’s one to watch.

flushed.jpg

The final, and most captivating of all, was Smafulgar (Two Birds) by Runar Runarrson. A short that made waves at Cannes was awarded both the Anthony Mingella Best Director Award and Sasusfaction Best Drama Award at Super Shorts. Shot on 35mm, it’s a gripping story of a shy teenager who loses his innocence overnight. Stunning cinematography, and with the perfect mix of narrative and intimacy on camera, it has also that all-important feature of a short – the catching of breath as the credits begin to roll.

Here’s to next year’s supershorts!



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Categories art

Amelia’s Magazine | Tent London 2011 Review: Best Lighting Design

Tent London 2012 review -Curiousa & Curiousa
Hand blown glass lighting by Curiousa & Curiousa.

I have been collecting fabulous lamps since I first started to scavenge second hand stores as a teenager. Here’s what caught my eye at Tent London this year.

Tent London 2012 review -Curiousa & Curiousa
Tent London 2012 review -Curiousa & Curiousa
Tent London 2012 review -Curiousa & Curiousa
I adored these jewel-like blown glass lamps by Curiousa & Curiousa from the Derbyshire town of Wirksworth. Each lampshade is traditionally blown without moulds so that any shape, check size or colour can be achieved according to a client’s wishes.

Tent London 2012 review -Kaspa REthinkthings
I was immediately attracted to the Kaspa glow-in-the-dark lamp by REthinkthings on the 5ml stand. What fun, viagra and a great xmas present for kids, both small and slightly larger… The 5ml Design Collective is a partnership between Ilsa Parry, Michael Cloke and Tom Sutton that aims so support and nurture up and coming design.

Tent London 2012 review -Rachel Powell
I first spotted Rachel Powell‘s clever wood veneer lampshades at the New Designers graduate showcase this summer. Since then her business has been growing at such a rate that she was able to take part in this much more professional industry showcase.

Take a peek at my review of the ceramic design at Tent London, the surface design at Tent London and the best furniture at Tent London too.

Categories ,2011, ,5ml Design Collective, ,Curiousa & Curiousa, ,Derbyshire, ,Ghost, ,Glow-in-the-Dark, ,Ilsa Parry, ,Kaspa, ,Lamp, ,Lampshades, ,Laser Etched, ,Lighting, ,London Design Festival, ,Michael Cloke, ,New Designers, ,Rachel Powell, ,REthinkthings, ,review, ,Tent London, ,Tom Sutton, ,Wirksworth, ,Wood Veneer

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Amelia’s Magazine | The ACOFI Book Tour: the first night at Tatty Devine, Covent Garden

ACOFI Book Tour Tatty Devine Covent Garden

On Tuesday evening The ACOFI Book Tour got off to a flying start at the Tatty Devine store in Covent Garden. As people started to arrive Rosie, Sonja and I laid out fragrant pots of Lahloo Tea to be drunk from beautiful retro china mugs and placed the gorgeous Cute as a Cupcake miniature cupcakes on a Tatty Devine laser cut doily: adorable in pink with butterflies on top.

ACOFI Book Tour Tatty Devine Covent Garden Lahloo Tea
ACOFI Book Tour Tatty Devine Covent Garden Lahloo Tea
Sonja serves up some delicious Lahloo Tea.

ACOFI Book Tour Tatty Devine Covent Garden Cute as a Cupcake
ACOFI Book Tour Tatty Devine Covent Garden Cute as a Cupcake
Cute as a Cupcake. Indeed.

One of the first to arrive was Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration contributor Gemma Milly, who was unable to come to my first launch party because she swanned off to Canada for several months, so it was really wonderful to finally meet her. She wasted no time in grabbing a pen and settling in to some wonderful window painting.

ACOFI Book Tour Tatty Devine Covent Garden-Gemma Milly
Gemma Milly gets down to some serious window painting.

Soon she was joined by ACOFI illustrators Jo Cheung and June Chanpoomidole, also known as June Sees. Both of whom studied at Westminster and are known for their very different but equally colourful illustrations.

ACOFI Book Tour Tatty Devine Covent Garden-June Chanpoomidole
June Chanpoomidole with cupcake.

ACOFI Book Tour Tatty Devine Covent Garden-Jo Cheung
Jo Cheung painting one of her inimitable feathered friends. Here’s her round up.

ACOFI Book Tour Tatty Devine Covent Garden-Jo Cheung, June and Gemma Milly
ACOFI illustrators – Jo Cheung, June and Gemma Milly.

ACOFI Book Tour Tatty Devine Ester Kneen
I finally got the chance to meet Esther Kneen, who has been a long term contributor to Amelia’s Magazine. Just check out that stunning sewing machine tattoo! So marvellous. And she’s also written a nice little blog about the event.

ACOFI Book Tour Tatty Devine Covent Garden-Maria Papadimitriou Juiceology
Maria Papadimitriou wearing some of her Plastic Seconds.

Also present was Maria Papadimitriou, who – as well as creating illustrations for Amelia’s Magazine – makes stunning and unusual jewellery from upcycled objects under the name Plastic Seconds, available in the ICA shop. I particularly like her deodorant lid necklace which was hanging from her neck like a giant brightly coloured egg. I’m going to start saving my lids so she can make me something! She’s currently planning a wall for Supermarket Sarah: expect big things from this talented girl.

ACOFI Book Tour Tatty Devine Covent Garden-Juiceology
ACOFI Book Tour Tatty Devine Covent Garden 2011-Juiceology
ACOFI Book Tour Tatty Devine Covent Garden 2011-Juiceology
I found it most entertaining that so many people were brightly dressed to match the wonderful Juiceology drinks.

Juiceology have kindly offered to donate juice for every single one of my book tour events, so please do come down and take the opportunity to try one of their stunningly flavoured natural juices, Apple, Lime & Mint, Lychee, Berry & Basil or Mandarin, Citrus & Cardamom. Each juice has been created according to the fine art of mixology, most often used to conjure up cocktails: it should therefore come as no surprise that Juiceology juices are so very special. I particularly love the Mojito-like kick of Apple, Lime and Mint, but it’s hard to choose a favourite out of the three. The Lychee, Berry and Basil is a stunning purple colour which in my mind can only mean good things, and all the juices contain a nice dose of very healthy Milk Thistle extract, renowned as a liver detoxicant.

ACOFI Book Tour Tatty Devine Covent Garden michalis christodoulou
Also present was new fashion illustration contributor Michalis Christodoulou

ACOFI Book Tour Tatty Devine Covent Garden-Ursula Gregory
My mother became most enamoured of a wonderful Tatty Devine fireworks necklace, so we persuaded her to buy it, isn’t it amazeballs?

ACOFI Book Tour Tatty Devine Covent Garden-Emma Crosby Sara Darling Imogen Belfield
Emma Crosby, Sara Darling and Imogen Belfield.

PR and Tribaspace representative Emma Crosby came along with jewellery designer extraordinaire Imogen Belfield and fashion stylist Sara Darling (who I’ve known for over ten years! She was on reception at The Face when I was an intern.)

ACOFI Book Tour Tatty Devine Covent Garden-Veronica Crespi
It was also a delight to see Veronica Crespi of Rewardrobe, London’s first slow wear consultancy, who I introduced to some new eco fashion friends.

ACOFI Book Tour Tatty Devine Covent Garden-Amelia Rosie
Myself with Rosie of Tatty Devine.

ACOFI Book Tour Tatty Devine Covent Garden Gemma Milly
ACOFI Book Tour Tatty Devine Covent Garden Gemma Milly June sees
ACOFI Book Tour Tatty Devine Covent Garden
ACOFI Book Tour Tatty Devine Covent Garden

At about 7pm everyone gathered in the store and sat down to listen to the talk, which was a bit strange for me to do in such a relaxed setting as this: I am more used to lecturing at universities. But I tried to keep it as informal as possible and encouraged everyone to ask questions. I talked a little bit about the history of Amelia’s Magazine, how I put together my two books, eco fashion and the importance of social networking for creatives.

ACOFI Book Tour Tatty Devine Covent Garden-window painting
ACOFI Book Tour Tatty Devine Covent Garden-window painting
ACOFI Book Tour Tatty Devine Covent Garden-window painting
ACOFI Book Tour Tatty Devine Covent Garden-window painting
Windows painted!

Afterwards everyone carried on networking and chatting and at the end of the night the atmosphere was so relaxed that no one really wanted to leave. I take this as a good sign! Especially without alcohol! Everyone commented on how nice it was to have a booze free event: a mild sugar high being the only consequence of so much cupcake consumption.

ACOFI Book Tour Tatty Devine Covent Garden Dr.Hauschka
Dr.Hauschka once again donated some lovely freebie skincare samples for attendees to take away with them. Some of the boys were particularly intrigued to try out the Firming and Rejuvenating Masks, so I look forward to some photos of hairy faces sporting creamy masks very soon.

ACOFI Book Tour Tatty Devine Covent Garden
ACOFI Book Tour Tatty Devine Covent Garden-Jeremy Scott sunglasses, Love them
Jeremy Scott sunglasses available at Tatty Devine, love them. My necklace is also Tatty Devine.

ACOFI Book Tour Tatty Devine Covent Garden
ACOFI Book Tour Tatty Devine Covent Garden-Emma Crosby
ACOFI Book Tour Tatty Devine Covent Garden

In the meantime if you would like to join The ACOFI Book Tour please do make sure you check in with the various places I will be visiting, and book where necessary so we can anticipate numbers. Read all about my future destinations here. I will be back at Tatty Devine in Brick Lane on the last date of my tour on Tuesday 7th June. I look forward to seeing you very soon!

ACOFI Book Tour Tatty Devine Covent Garden
ACOFI Book Tour Tatty Devine Covent Garden
ACOFI Book Tour Tatty Devine Covent Garden Sara Darling

Our paintings will remain on the window of the Tatty Devine Covent Garden store at 44 Monmouth Street for the next few weeks, and you can buy ACOFI online here. Read Tatty Devine’s blog about the event and Maria Papadimitriou’s lovely blog from the night. Jo Cheung even wrote a synopsis of what I spoke about!

ACOFI Book Tour Tatty Devine Covent Garden Cute as a Cupcake
Oh go on then, just one more Cute as a Cupcake

Categories ,ACOFI, ,ACOFI Book Tour, ,Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration, ,Apple, ,Apple Lime & Mint, ,cupcakes, ,Cute as a Cupcake, ,Dr.Hauschka, ,Eco fashion, ,Emma Crosby, ,Ester Kneen, ,Gemma Milly, ,ica, ,Imogen Belfield, ,Jeremy Scott, ,jewellery, ,Jo Cheung, ,Juiceology, ,June Chanpoomidole, ,June Sees, ,Lahloo, ,Lahloo Tea, ,Lychee, ,Lychee Berry & Basil, ,Mandarin Citrus & Cardamom, ,Maria Papadimitriou, ,Michalis Christodoulou, ,Milk Thistle, ,Mojito, ,Plastic Seconds, ,Rewardrobe, ,Sara Darling, ,Slowly the Eggs, ,Sunglasses, ,Tatty Devine, ,Tribaspace, ,Veronica Crespi, ,Westminster

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Amelia’s Magazine | The House of Books Has No Windows

You know those rainy afternoons when you sit indoors, dosage information pills flicking through the pages of any number of trashy magazines and getting suddenly, order inexplicably excited at the idea of fashion? Or, try more accurately, at the idea of brilliant style. It’s enough to make you want to plunge head first into the glossy pages and never return. That’s the effect it has on me, anyway. I trace my fingers around the outline of a beautiful silk bolero, sigh wistfully over the idea of a chunky knotted belt and a chiffon dress. ‘If only,’ I think ‘if only I could own all of these things, perhaps then my life would be complete’ (did I mention that I also have a mild tendency towards hyperbolic exaggeration?)

In the cold light of day, of course, I would not be more complete with these things, what I would actually be is more like everybody else. It is so rare that I find something that isn’t run-of-the-mill, that when I do I feel it my duty to shout about it from the rooftops. Only I heard rooftops were dangerous, so I decided to use Amelia’s blog instead.

Projects Design Wear is a perfect little gem nestled in the heart of Nottingham city centre among the style-seekers and just left of the cool kids. For years this little boutique has been charming all and it’s not just because of the effervescent mixture of clothing. Walking into Projects is like being folded into an enormous bear-hug by a large and much-loved Uncle. Their staff are friendly, remember who you are and are always on hand to personal-shop for you until one of you drops.

projects%203.jpg

Settled in amongst the dark wood furnishings and lashings of vibrant paint is a sartorial feast for men and women alike. The first floor houses menswear. If you like bright colours and bold statements, ask for House of Gods and !Solid t-shirts. If casual with a twist is more your style, then you’ll be happy to pore over the offerings from Raygun. And an absolute must is their selection of denim. Now, I’m not a man, but I know some, and I have been shopping with a few. I know how maddening guys find it searching for individual jeans. Made out of proper denim, and in proper denim washes, Projects’ selection is perfect for boys who don’t want a tag on their arse, but still want their togs durable and fashionable. What more could you ask?

projects%20jeans.jpg

Well, you could ask for another floor, laden with women’s clothing so pretty you could cry. Lovely changing rooms with real curtains (none of this fabric-not-quite-meeting-cubicle tosh) are waited on by lovely ladies. Stock ranges from cute cardigans to chic evening wear and takes in everything in between as well. There are printed t-shirts and slouchy knits from Numph and high-end gloss from Naughty (check out the black sheen dress). There are these things sitting happily alongside the sort of effortlessly elegant dresses that you always see on other people and can never actually find for yourself. I found them, and I am bequeathing them to you.

Not only this, but there is (be still my beating heart) a glorious range of jewellery. Not just any jewellery mind, but pieces from none other than her majesty; Vivienne Westwood. A rare find indeed among the usual gaggle of costume pieces, and a fine way to top an otherwise genius little store. Ladies must also be sure to check out the selection of men’s scarves downstairs. I have several, and I love them all, equally.

Projects
is not only a clothes shop, it is also a platform for new talent, happily selling for local designers, like Bantum (the I Love Notts t-shirts continue to fly of the shelves). It is this commitment to innovation and this willingness to give a leg-up to emerging new talent that has planted the shop firmly in the hard hearts of all of us Midlanders. I offer wild applause to Projects for its unique take on fashion and for delivering what we all secretly want: simple, affordable, wonderful clothes that not everybody else will have. And when recession looms, it’s ever-more important to invest in the interesting, independent places.

Images courtesy of Projects Design Wear
Have a greener Christmas!

Thursday 20th – Sunday 23rd November

side effects +Bargehouse+Street%E2%80%A8+South+Bank, malady +%E2%80%A8London, this +SE1+9PH&sll=37.0625,-95.677068&sspn=44.60973,74.794922&ie=UTF8&z=16″target=”_blank”>Bargehouse, ?Oxo Tower Wharf?, Bargehouse Street? South Bank, ?London, SE1 9PH

11am – 7pm
?Entry £1: Kids go free!

ethical_christmas_emporium1.jpg

Not feeling particularly Christmassy just yet? A visit to the Bargehouse this weekend may change all that…With three floors boasting over forty stalls, the Ethical Christmas Emporium will include the likes of Divine Chocolate, RSPB, Shared Earth, Zaytoun, The World Music Network, Malika, Jump 4 Timbuktu, Earthscan Publishing, Pants to Poverty, Planet Silver Chilli, Manumit and The Hemp Trading Company. The event will bring together the very best in Fairtrade, ethical, sustainable and environmental gift ideas around!

Enjoying this magical time of year can be wonderfully eco-friendly; Shopping here not only provides an escape from the busy high streets, but the secure knowledge that every stall is working under a Fairtrade ethos, making sure producers around the world all have something to celebrate this Christmas.
The atmosphere is lovely, and everyone seems to be smiling as the event opens on the Thursday. Discounts are available as many stalls have cut their prices specially for this event.

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Shopping is not the only thing on the agenda at this event, a local Youth Club Choir from Ghana will be entertaining the crowds via live satellite link-up. Kids entry is free and while there they can enjoy lots of specially created activities- Green Santa will be there too to spread some ethical Christmas joy! Grown ups will also be able to delight in food tasting, films, informative talks, music and much more…

The Ethical Christmas Emporium is being hosted by Hand Up Media , the ethical publishing & media company which promotes Fair Trade and ethical lifestyle issues in a positive, stylish and empowering way to consumers across the UK and beyond.

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The Oxo Tower Wharf

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Monday 24th November
Anything that makes the art world seem a little more accessible is always nice, cure and an open-submission painting competition is one such an opportunity. The Marmite Prize for Painting is a biannual exhibition at Studio 1.1 in East London. Perhaps you’ve entered yourself, or you’d like to get a glance at some of the entries before the winners are selected. The exhibition opens today and runs until the end of the week.
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Tuesday 25th November
There will be dancing, there will be porcelain deer skulls, and there will be bird houses, a hundred of them in fact. The Wapping Project, a Hydraulic Power Station turned multi-purpose exhibition space that now hosts an exploration on the social and cultural phenomenon of the British Season. Turning the Season will run until the 28th of February, and it’s free.


Wednesday 26th November

You know how there’s always a kid in a film who’s Lego creations far out-strip the usual tower blocks of most children, well James Johnson-Perkins was certainly one such child, “I spent my whole life building imaginary universes with children’s building blocks”. At EXHIBIT until the 28th of December, he presents his solo show, 50 Robots. Come and see what one man can do with 2,800 construction blocks. Free.
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Thursday 27th November
Starting today, a group show put together by Stella Dore begins in their new gallery space at 42 Rivington Street, featuring the artists on their roster. It’s between 6 and 9 pm, and it’s called ‘Make-Over”.
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Friday 28th November

The Guardian has named him “Britain’s greatest cultural asset”, and after some 12 years of “painting on the doll”, amongst many other things, there’s no end to the volume work to show for this artist/author/poet/film-maker/singer and guitarist, phew! If you haven’t guessed, we’re talking about Billy Childish. Heroes of the British Art Resistance runs until the 23rd of December at the Aquarium L-13.
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Saturday 29th November

The You Me Bum Bum Train – like nothing you’ve experienced!
If you try to describe this to someone (which you shouldn’t, don’t give anything away), you will sound like you are drawing from memory a nonsensical and fantastical dream, not something remotely tangible that could have actually happened in a 25 minute journey through a Shorditch warehouse. Reality is turned upside down as you are wheeled (as the sole participant) through fifteen distinct interactive scenarios, where over 70 artists act out micro-performances, leaving you to get as involved as you much as feel compelled to. “Designed to mentally and visually astound”, check, “leaving you overwhelmed and exhilarated” check, and check, and finishing the ride “in a totally different emotional state from the one you were in when you embarked on the journey”, most definitely true. It’s fifteen pound price is money well spent, and it runs every Saturday until the 20th of December. Go!
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Sunday 30th November

Behind the Shutters – muTATE Britain
The Shutters were lifted this Thursday to the three story disused warehouse that is the largest non-corporate exhibition space in London. With Mutoid Waste taking the ground floor, I got my first whiff of nostalgia for muddy fields (Trash City at Glastonbury), a sentiment of bubbling creativity that runs through the entire event. It’s a multi-media circus, lots of interactive art, and it’s set to change every week through it’s lifespan. This weekend the theme is “Deface Value”, featuring the likes of Tracy Emin and David Cameron alike (yup, the Conservative leader). It opens Friday, Saturday and Sunday between 1.30 and 10 pm.
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‘The House of Books Has No Windows’, this site a touring exhibition by Canadian artists Janet Cardiff and George Bures Miller kicked off at the Fruitmarket Gallery in Edinburgh- now on at Modern Art Oxford– is an apt title for a show in this most literary of cities. The eponymous installation is a wendy house made from an array of books, this from novels to travel guides. Climbing inside feels safe, like entering a childhood den, and evocatively musty yet also claustrophobic and imposing.

The other six installations in the show see the pair entwine sound and movement. ‘The Dark Pool’, the couple’s first project together back in 1995, is a ramshackle room of seemingly disparate objects and speakers pouring out snatches of conversation. From this wellspring of vintage clothes, tattered books, old records, tea leaves and wax hands, a creeping sense of tension emanates; a pregnancy in the air as if something has happened or is about to. The pivot of the piece is a leather trunk, in which a scene has been constructed with miniature plastic model figures. They stand looking into a dark pool, a car lies abandoned while miniature lights twinkle overhead.

‘The Dark Pool’ anaesthetises you from looking for concrete connections between the objects and sounds in the room. Strands of meaning do coalesce and emerge, nudged along by snatches of conversation and the physical ephemera but, like an abstract poem, the whole hangs together without needing to be fully explained.

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The Killing Machine
Partly this stems from duo’s ability to make the viewer suspend disbelief. This is repeated, most devastatingly, in ‘The Killing Machine’ (2007); a Kafka-inspired, kitschly sinister torture chamber, where robotic arms move as elegantly as long-necked birds, prodding and poking a dentists chair covered in pink fur, all sound tracked by screeching electric guitars. Again this bizarre scenario hangs together completely. The audience (mostly…) seemed to accept it on its own terms, becoming compelled by a murky narrative that so easily could have just baffled.

The less successful installations are the more explained ones. The slide show ‘Road Trip’(2004) for example, rambles without the sense of magic or theatre of other scenarios.
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Opera for Small Room
One installation on its own justifies a visit. ‘Opera for a Small Room’(2008), a shed piled high with records and lights that synchronise to a chopped up soundtrack which covers everything from wolves howling to a full blown rock opera. It is the couple’s most recent work and sees them continue to generate the mysterious wonder that characterises the best of their earlier work.

Written by Priya Umachandran

Categories ,Art, ,exhibition, ,George Bures Miller, ,Installation, ,Janet Cardiff, ,Modern Art Oxford, ,The House of Books Has No Windows

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Amelia’s Magazine | THE NANCYBOY DECADE 1999-2009

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Emit Bloch - Dictaphones Vol 1

Creaturemag’s Matt Witt and Emma Tucker recently spent the afternoon talking to lo-fi folk songwriter Emit Bloch. They were kindly invited to his house for a friendly chat about his new album, information pills his influences and his past.

Emit Bloch has recently released an album, viagra 60mgDictaphones Vol 1”. An endearing and off kilter selection of country songs recorded entirely on dictaphone cassette and released by One Little Indian. The album is raw, ampoule uncluttered and accessible, full of inventive lyrical content that contrasts the vintage sound produced by the dictaphone with more modern day references.

Emit grew up on a ranch in Utah before heading to Berkeley, California then more recently making his home in North London. The following interview includes discussion on, amongst other things, Emit’s Dictaphone mash-ups, (rough recordings of well known songs mashed together), his new album, his views on song writing, evolution and a little delve into his past.

That is enough from us, this wonderful encounter is to be discovered in the following videos.

View the rest of this interview on You tube using the following links:

Emit Bloch interview – pt2 – Dictaphones Vol1
Emit Bloch interview – pt3 – Emit on songwriting
Emit Bloch interview – pt4 – Emit on evolution
Emit Bloch interview – pt5 – Emit on his past

Or check it out on Creaturemag… www.creaturemag.com

We hope you enjoy the show!

I’ve never been to the Book Club before, information pills it’s a nice place you know; high ceilings, visit this exposed brickwork, viagra buy excitingly erratic cone shaped lampshades.
On your left as you come in there’s a load of pot plants stuck to the wall like they are hovering there. Opposite and tucked away behind the door currently is Nancyboy aka Stuart Semple’s self portrait bearing the legend:

CONCRETE FOR THE BOYS
PILLOWS FOR THE GIRLS
THIS IS THE REAL WORLD
NOTHING IS TRUE

Somewhere in the territory between Banksy and Basquiat, the Nancyboy paintings collected here say everything about nothing, or nothing about everything, depending on which way you prefer it.
The paintings are a mashup of cultural and personal references, littered with bittersweet cynical catchphrases and copywrite symbols; cartoon characters, collage, self deprecating and esoteric test. Also, a pair of wonder pants. In a perfect reflection of the high end cultural recycling aesthetic of the work, curator Liat Chen was wearing a fabulous dress previously owned by Lady Gaga.
The tagline to the exhibition is “a retrospective of early works by a leading cultural phenomenon” and I think that says it really, it’s the story behind these paintings that’s really on show. Klaus Bruecker, who I met at the Pop up Pirates launch last month (after Amelia went home) was one of the earliest collectors of Nancyboy paintings on ebay way back in the heady nineties. More recently imagine his surprise when he realised the artist was in fact living in the same building as him!

Stuart Semple has done a lot of things as an artist, in the real life artworld that is, like sneak a painting into Saatchi Gallery, and be a real artist who’s critically acclaimed and stuff. But I think this show is more about his presence in the less artworld world, if that makes sense. “He got me into collecting, he got a lot of different people from lots of different backgrounds collecting.” Says Klaus. Because in the early noughties everything seemed possible and local on the internet, we were more aware of the smallness of the new connected world. Nancyboy launched his e-art career in 2000, and went on to sell over 3000 works exclusively on ebay. His work attracted much attention, celebrity collectors and spawned many imitators, combining his pop and urban decay aesthetic to express their own cultural angst in what has been called a pre-emptive movement to ‘Urban Art’.

These days every sensible artist on the make works hard on their web presence, and anyone looking to buy some great value beautiful art barely has to stretch their mousclicking finger beyond the front page of websites like etsy and society6. But even now it’s still possible to make amazing connections and to grow chance encounters into new interests and audiences. Like in the real world I guess.

The paintings here are not that different from the blog output of a witty teenager. They remind me quite a lot of the work I used to love on www.themanwhofellasleep.com when I was doing my A-levels, and also of Athena posters. Those are my circular cultural references, real pop art should do that I think; remind us infinitely of ourselves. Being an institution is not easy though. It takes love and it takes A LOT of work. The works brought together at The Book Club by the Nancyboy community are obviously loved and valued. These are not the high-profile works that have been in the big shows. These are the ebay artworks, from the homes of real humans.
And I hope what it means is that high flying pop artists don’t have to lose their roots. That all the little little art communities all over the world in small towns and small webspaces that no-one else knows about matter, and are all a part of the bigger dialogue of art forever. And at the same time are nothing, and your life work is just your hobby. One of Nancyboy’s paintings calls his standing into question:
FRANKLY, I Question it’s Honesty + Doubt it’s Art.

In September I’m going back to school to qualify as an art teacher. I think I will tell my students about Nancyboy. Because it’s important, not that anyone can make it, because that’s obviously not true. And not that they can do the same, because they never can. Each artist makes their own new path. The Nancyboy
decade saw the world change forever, and he was there watching, and commenting, and selling his paintings on Ebay. That’s what’s important.

Categories ,banksy, ,Basquiat, ,exhibition, ,Lady Gaga, ,nancyboy, ,Pop Up Pirates, ,Stuart Semple, ,The Book Club

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Amelia’s Magazine | The Treehouse Gallery: Tree’s Company

Featuring competitions in the already overly competitive world that is Art may seem somewhat crude to say the least. But in fact it’s through these well supported and sponsored prizes that new and underexposed artists and creative mediums gain a platform and a voice, information pills page and a fairly fair and just route for career progression out of the studios and into the spotlight. It’s also a darn good excuse to curate a fine exhibition of very talented folk, hospital and in a collaborative sense get together with a common thread, clinic be it the format, subject matter or genre, and share opinions, ideas and approaches. I call to the stand Foto8 and their annual Photographic Prize an exhibition of which opens with a right knees up of a party this weekend in London.

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Joerg Brueggermann (2009 Entry)

Foto8, in their own words, is ‘a space to share, comment and debate photography. The site exists to bridge the divide between photographers, authors and their audience through interactive displays and a constant stream of new works and resources’. Based on the belief that documentary photography has a vital role to play in contemporary society, Foto8′s ethos firmly pushes the medium as a valued tool for communication and self education about the world around us and the lesser understood worlds of others.

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Abbie Traylor-Smith (2009 Entry)

The London based website has regular postings of reviews, commentaries, interviews and picture stories as well as photographic events and news items, and serves as an outlet for the biannually published 8 magazine, which can be previewed, ordered and subscribed to from there. Now up to issue 25 the magazine blurs and tests the boundaries between photography, journalism and art and represents ‘the very best in design and print, following a graphic format that uses the medium of the printed page to its fullest.’

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Robert Hackman (2009 Entry)

The Gallery that will house this spectacular show was established by director of Foto8 Jon Levy along with Adrian Evans, the director of Panos Pictures, and celebrates it’s fourth birthday this year. HOST is dedicated to the specialised promotion and exploration of photojournalism and documentary photography, ‘from classical black and white reportage to contemporary mixed media’. They pioneer both new and traditional methods of manipulating the gallery setting with innovation and passion. The gallery proudly boasts a highly-respected exhibition schedule, complimented by an on-going program of face-to-face encounters with photography and film, including screenings, talks and regular book club meetings.

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Clemence de Limburg (2009 Entry)

From around 2300 images submitted from 44 different countries from as far afield as Thailand and Turkey, just over 100 carefully selected images will make up the final display at this year’s Foto 8 Summer Show at London’s HOST Gallery. As well as each entry appearing in the show’s published book, each photograph will be for sale to the public from the opening night and throughout the exhibition, and of course each and every exhibit will be in with the chance to win either the ‘Best in Show’ category or the ‘People’s Choice’, both highly sort after and respected prizes in the industry.

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Dougie Wallace (2008 Winner of ‘Best in Show’)

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Guido Castagnoli (2008 Winner of ‘People’s Choice’)

Whereas the Best in Show is awarded by an elite team of experts in the field, including The Times’ Director of Photography Graham Wood and the V&A’s Head of Images Andrea Stern, and entails a £1500 reward, the People’s Choice will be determined by public visitors to the show and in many respects is a more coveted title, given that each exhibitor’s work must speak to those with perhaps a less trained eye for artistic and technical merit, and must rely on more personal and emotional responses from the everyday spectator.

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Domenico Pugliese (2009 Entry)

The brief for prospective entrants was simple. They seek images that challenge and engage, convey stories and raise questions. They state that they ‘encourage free expression’ and ‘new ways of seeing and telling’, also adding that they value photography ‘that conveys feeling as much as fact.’ The entry requirements allow for up to three submitted images per person, and the submissions look set to be as diverse and varied as 2008′s collections were.

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Rachel Bevis (2009 Entry)

Being the biased art appreciators that we are, there is already a winner of an entry in our opinion, an image that stands out for us and will be certainly receiving the ‘Amelia’s Choice’ award at the opening on Friday evening. ‘Marie’ by semi-professional London based photographer Rachel Bevis commands our attention and holds our gaze. At first seeming to be a mono-chrome image of a lone figure at night, on second appreciation is actually a wintery street scene in which a female is immersed in falling snow. Mysterious, evocative and powerful this photograph is one we cannot tire of looking at. Best of luck Miss Bevis.

Who will you be exercising your democratic rights and voting for?

Foto8 Summer Show
HOST Gallery
1 Honduras Street
London, EC1Y 0TH

24th July: Opening Night Party
6:30pm – 11:30pm

Tickets: £5 in advance, £8 on the door
Tickets available to buy here

24th July – 5th September
Opening times:
Mon-Fri 10am-6pm
Sat 11am-4pm

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Kurt Tong (2009 Entry)
One of the organisations we’ve been following of late at Amelia’s Magazine is the Ethical Fashion Forum. Springing up in 2004 following the concerns made famous in the international press during the 1990s – sweatshop working, information pills terrible wages and mass environmental damage – a group of designers decided to do something about it by raising awareness. Liasing with over 400 designers, fashion brands and other fashion businesses, the EFF connects people who want to promote a sustainable future for the fashion industry; this includes creating safe working environments and increasing wages in oft-exploited third world countries, as well as encouraging minimal environmental damage. Closely tied to this venture is the Fair Trade Foundation – pinpointing exactly how topical a sustainable fashion industry has become in recent years alongside the massive interest in Fair Trade products.

Earlier in the year EFF launched it’s biannual “Innovation” competition for designers, the first being PURE, rewarding and recognising those who have shown innovation (!) and initiative regarding the greater good of the fashion world. The shortlist of competitors was announced last month, and gave publicity to an assortment of passionate designers who are keen to support a sustainable and ethical fashion future through their business strategies and design work. The competition hopes to raise awareness of the EFF’s goals and views by rewarding those who have shown similar ethical principles to itself, whilst at the same time inspiring this generation of designers to work together for a better future. The overused cliché of “green is the new black” really seems to be ringing true at EFF!

This years shortlist of 12 included designers from all over the world, all excited to promote the EFF message; those from or working in South Africa, Malawi, India, China and North America were all on show, with a good percentage of designers working in poverty-stricken Third World countries. The designers largely sourced their materials from traditional industries all over the world, and particularly in struggling areas, as shown by this quick survey of the territories they work within. Others are supporting local industries within the UK, such as crofting in the Scottish Highlands. Each were judged on their collection’s overall design and finish, their brand ethics, and their sale-ability, by a panel including Anna Orsini, head of London Fashion Week, Donna Wallace of ELLE magazine, alongside other senior fashion journalists and lecturers.

So who came up trumps in the end? Being selected to show at the PURE trade show, the winners were Cape Town brand Lalesso, and MIA, another African working in Malawi. Lalesso was a clear box-ticker: initially set up to provide a “socially responsible method of manufacturing”.

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Designing clothes based on East African traditions and current trends, the label aids struggling unemployment by providing well-paid work for several different groups, from the unskilled ‘beach boys’ to the traditionally skilled Masaai tradesmen. The clothes are vibrant, fun and youthful, including patterned prom dresses and casual beach wear, showcasing typical laidback African style tailored for a fashion-conscious audience who care.

MIA was an equally obvious winner. Recycling vintage pieces is no new idea; however MIA has taken this to new lengths with her remade clothing. Using second- hand streetwear combined with traditional Malawian dress, she has created designs that are thoroughly modern, embracing the current fascination with all things retro and uniquely individual.

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MIA’s message is to embrace our wardrobes and recycle them in order to prevent such widespread textile waste in the way that we recycle food packaging and other products in the new millennium. She’s another designer interested in the capacities of upcycled clothing, and is keen to promote change with her range of smock style mini dresses combining different materials in their zig-zag skirts.

Some of the other candidates we were keen on included Henrietta Ludgate, a Central Saint Martins graduate and Scottish designer hailing from the Highlands.

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Embracing her Highland roots, this designer used crofting techniques in her collections in a way that has not been seen in recent years, supporting local industries with her work. Crofting involves reusing excess waste material from mills as part of a small community of workers who all support each other.

A similar idea can be seen with Outsider, who support the oft-abused textile industries in China and India through sourcing organic fabrics and providing fair labour conditions and wages, true to the EFF message. Stating that “we believe ethical fashion should just look like fashion” these designers are certainly up there with the best of the bunch.

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Their latest collection featured reworked classic shapes with pleat detailing and simple lines, all in sophisticated black, with the main focus of the design work being on the use of sustainable fabrics to inspire confidence in what we’re wearing and how it is sustaining the fashion industry globally.

Coming up in September will be the Esethetica awards when more winners will be announced – what did you make of the shortlist and did you agree with the winners? Let us know!

Monday 27th July
Coco Electrik- Pure Groove, help London

On it as we generally are, hospital we included Coco Electrik in our magazine a while back. Fun poppy danceable electro with a surreal twist.

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Tuesday 28th
First Aid Kit – The Lexington, London

We love First Aid Kit and their oddball folk complete with tinkling harmonies, and they carried of their set at Climate Camp Glastonbury with aplomb I hear. Support comes from Blue Roses, whom I’ve known of for a while under her “day-to-day” name Laura Groves, her music is achingly delicate and beautiful.

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Wednesday 29th July
Simian Mobile Disco- Roundhouse, London

Simian Mobile Disco have been shimmying their way into our hearts and minds for a while now. Funky and exuberant, their latest release features vocals from Alexis Taylor and Beth Ditto

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Thursday 30th July
Maps – Hoxton Bar and Grill, London

I would definitely put Maps‘ lo-fi bedroom electronica on my “Top 3 Things To Do With Maps” List alongside every indie schmindie’s make-out song of choice by the Yeah Yeah Yeahs and actual maps which are great. A must for fans of Low and My Bloody Valentine.

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Friday 31st July
Left With PicturesBush Hall, London

Left With Pictures is a whirling mix of vocal harmonising, melodicas, violins…the whole shebang. It’s quite exciting and suprising to listen to and more than a little bit evocative of another era. Lovely stuff!

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Saturday 1st August
Field Day– Victoria Park, London

Ahh London’s favourite festival returns, highlights include the mighty Mogwai, Final Fanatsy, Four Tet and Fanfarlo.

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Sometimes, discount the maxim that “two heads are better than one”, page certainly rings true. Well, check never has this been more appropriate than with dynamic design partners in crime, Siamese duo, Fanny and Jessy, the East London pair causing a stir on the design scene at the moment. Having recently graduated from the London College of Fashion, these young designers have set about refusing to pigeonhole their collections into trends or even genders, preferring to leave it all unisex. How Judith Butler would have approved!

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The new collection, cheekily named “I hope you die soon”, features designs that are something of a cross between Donnie Darko and Topshop Unique. Think fringing, fraying, and rippling, pod shapes, skinny fit leggings and rock star fur. Imagine Aerosmith‘s Steven Tyler raiding David Bowie‘s wardrobe; its rock’n’roll mixed with futuristic meets minimalistic; it’s a bit special indeed! Inspired in their own words, by music, art, film and life, the collection is something of an exception to trends of the moment. There’s no hint of these clothes fitting into a Vogue run-down of current catwalk trends emergent this season.

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Featuring cut out, holey leggings paired with cocoon-like tops with shoulder padding, shape and volume are a clear focus of the collection. Pod- like hoods and wide wide wide, sharp, triangular shoulder pads sculpt the tops, or only collars are left with no top to speak of! One constant is the shock or avant garde factor, alongside of course the extreme precision and talent that has gone in to combining so many different shapes and effects in a way that isn’t garish or over the top. The collection is very balanced in a Gemini like way. Must be the dual influence.

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The different photo shoots capturing the collection also serve to capture its different facets. Mark Cant‘s photography delineates the beautiful precision of the pieces with his optical illusions of blurring motion in black and white – whereas Christopher James’ pictures evoke the Hoxton art student feel, which was clearly a subconscious influence on the designers as students of East London.

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The models ride bicycles and lean against Brick Lane-esque graffiti scenes to give the clothes a really modern ‘James Dean‘ rebel feel. Ellie Scott too focuses on the youthful vibrancy of the pieces combined with an urban backdrop featuring railway arches and garages, even including a matching mottled car. The designers clearly knew when working with these photographers that the ideas behind their clothing would not be lost.

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The pair have unsurprisingly gathered something of a cult following, largely as a result of their collaborations with other artistic projects (as seen with their impeccable taste in fashion photographers). ‘Collaboration’ is a key word for these designers, it seems. Having worked with artist/film maker Danny Sangra on the logo of the label, the duo set about making a short film of the new collection released this month. The film perfectly captures the ethos of “I hope you die soon”. Featuring flashing torch light and heavy drum and bass, the jilting camera follows models stepping in and out of the spot light before beginning to dance. The underground, dirty basement setting adds scare factor, whilst also appealing to that underworld art student vibe of the collection, like a secret drum and bass rave.

Stepping back, you can see that Fanny and Jessy’s combined talents manifest themselves in a holistic sense, since they can be seen throughout not just the collection but also the promotional artwork surrounding it. I can’t wait to see what they come up with next.

Hackey Wicked Festival

Various Locations in Hackney Wick
1st August – 2nd August
Free Entry

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Photo by Margaret Stone

Hackney has for a while now been a hub of new exciting art activity. In celebration of the localised talent Hackey Wicked is back this year and according to NY Arts Magazine is ‘the most vital art event of the Summer’. Covering all bases of creativity there will be a live Graffiti Jam, order outdoor film screenings, sildenafil workshops, flash mob punk choir, a raffle even a floating gallery, as well as open studios around the E9 area, details of which can be found on their site here.

Saturday 1 August
12.00pm – 10.00pm
Famous artist will cut the ribbon at noon

Hackney WickED’s OFFICIAL Art Fete with Artist-run Stalls, Live Art, Infatigable Decima Travelling Shop, Bribery Stall, Dog Races, Mobile Galleries, Games and Prizes, Raffle, Vintage Fashion, Bric-a-brac, Books and Records Food Stalls, Credit Crunch ‘n’ Fun and Hackney WickED Live Music Stage.

Sunday 2 August
12.30pm – 10.00pm
Closing Party along the Canal, Wallis Road, E9

The festival will be closing with a massive soiree and BBQ during Harry Meadow’s Coracle Regatta at 2pm, Watercolour Challenge, projections on the Olympic Fence, boat rides and Burning of the Wicker Man at dusk.

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Vauxhall Skate

Secret Shoreditch Location
July 29th
8pm – late

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“Vauxhall will be pushing the conventions of roller disco to another level this summer with their Vauxhall Skate event, which promises to take us on a journey through a 21st century vision of the future where 70s disco meets Knight Rider on roller skates. If the time travelling journey fails, at the very least, guests will get to enjoy the skating joys of their truly weird but wonderful Vauxhall Corsa roller skates.

DJs Remi Nicole, Alfie Allen, Carl Barat, Sophie Ellis Bextor and Smash and Grab’s DJ duo Queens of Noize will be manning the decks for the night. The Queens will also be bringing in Florence Welch from Florence and The Machine (who they manage and art direct) for a guest DJ spot. Other than the vehicle skates, there will be distractions a-plenty involving cakes, dressing up and hair styling. Jonny Woo will be hosting a ‘car-aroke’ complete with dressing-up props. A car pit-stop hair salon with free styling from Lyndell Mansfield, who’s currently working with The Gossip. Skaters can make energy pit stops at the hot dogs and cup cakes stands and Kate Moross has also been working on a special four-wheeled piece of art that will be on display.

Dazed and Vauxhall have partnered up to give away 35 pairs of free tickets for the roller skate extravaganza. Just click here to enter your email address to enter.”

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Rankin Live

Truman Brewery
91 Brick Lane
E1 6QL
London E1 6QL

31st July – 18th September
Daily 10am-8pm
Thursday until 10pm
Tickets: £10/£7

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You may have seen the huge black and white posters around in the last couple of weeks asking innocent passersby whether they ‘fancy a quick Rank?’ Well, the answer is a very definite ‘yes’ from us. The week is the opening of the hotly awaited Rankin Live exhibition, the first ever retrospective of the world renowned photographer Ian Rankin’s work covering an impressive 22 year career. To add a participatory element to the show, ‘Shoot Me, Rankin!’ is offering 1000 member of the public the chance to be captured by the man himself and for their portraits to instantly become part of the exhibition.

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Association of Illustrators: Images 33

London College of Communication
Elephant & Castle
London SE1 6SB

29th July – 12th August

Weekdays: 10 – 5pm
Saturdays: 10 – 4pm
Closed Sundays
Free Entry

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Image: Daniel Pudles’s dramatic editorial image Latitude, Leonard And The Mob

“The Association of Illustrators (AOI) are proud to present Images 33 – the best of British contemporary illustration 2009, the most prestigious and comprehensive illustration awards and exhibition in the UK today. On display are over 300 artworks showcasing the incredible talents of illustrators who have made a significant contribution to their industry over the last year.”

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Iconography of Masks

Resistance Gallery
265 Poyser Street
Bethnal Green
London E2 9RF

30th July – 2nd August
All Events Weekender Ticket: £15

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From festish, to death, to superheroes and tribes, masks are widely used and interpreted by all sorts of cultures and communities. This weekend you are invited to join the Iconography Of Mask folks and the likes of Bonnie Baker, Charles of London, Suckadelic and Pam Glew in celebrating all things mask, including workshops in mask making and a masked fashion show with DJs and live music.

Thurs 30th July Art Opening Exhibition: 7pm. Free (donation to IOM trust)

Friday 31st July Live Art, Bands, Dj’s & Masked Fashion Shows: 9pm-2am. £5

Saturday 1st August Mask Making Workshops and Seminars: 2pm-7pm. £5

Saturday 1st August Hoodlovers Ball, Dj’s & Performances: 10pm-late am. £10

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Elizabeth Peyton: Live Forever

Whitechapel Gallery
77-82 Whitechapel High Street
London E1 7QX

Until 10th September
Tuesday–Sunday:11am–6pm
Thursday: 11am–9pm
Free Entry

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New York resident Elizabeth Peyton is showcasing 70 or so paintings, including depictions of historical figures such as Bonaparte, iconic figures she has been inspired by such as Frida Kahlo, and artists from her own generation such as Matthew Barney. Oil paint, watercolour, ink or pencil, Peyton’s small but perfectly formed portraits using a combination of ‘realism, luminous palette and a rhythmic energy of line’.

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Craftwerk

St Aloysius Social Club
21 Phoenix Rd
London
NW1 1TA

Saturday August 1st
1pm – 5pm
Free

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Craftwerk is a sale of affordable handmade goods including clothing, homewares and toys from London-based artists and craftspeople. There are Funky Finds swag bags for the first 50 arrivals; also cakes and sweets stalls, a bar and a raffle.’

Thumbnail by Nishant Choski
Monday 27th July

Agrofuels: The Miracle of Creative Carbon Accounting

Deepak Rugani explains the problems with simply replacing a fossil fuel economy with an agrofuels one. Agrofuels promise to cut carbon emissions, malady burning plant oils not fossil fuels. In fact, this is wrong – according to Friends of the Earth, they ‘often deliver poor greenhouse gas savings and some of them pose a threat to ecosystems that act as vital carbon sinks.’

6.30 pm – venue to be announced (more info : Campaign against Climate Change)

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Illustrations by Sergio Membrillas

Tuesday 28th July

Workshops for Community Hydro Power

Water Power Enterprises, who specialise in community hydro power projects, are running some free workshops for community groups interested in setting up their own community-owned hydro schemes.

Friends of the Earth have previously worked with Water Power Enterprises to create their case study page for hydro power. They’ve also been involved with the Settle hydro project.

They’ve just won a national award with the Co-op for the ‘best’ collaborative venture regarding community hydro schemes. They’re looking to recuit more people to their workshops and I thought this worthwhile promoting. The workshops take place in Manchester and are scheduled for : July 28th, Sept 29th, Oct 29th, Nov 24th.

More information can be found at www.h2ope.org.uk or call Steve Welsh on 01706 813663

Wednesday 29th July

The Big Green Gathering

The Big Green Gathering is a five day family camping event which concentrates on all aspects of sustainable living. It combines entertainment with environmental awareness. Various fields are devoted to different aspects of sustainable and alternative lifestyles. Children are well catered for.

Contact: Big Green Gathering P.O. Box 3423 Glastonbury BA6 9ZN – 01458 834629 – info@big-green-gathering.com midday Wednesday to midnight Sunday – Fernhill Farm, Compton Martin, Somerset

Teddy Bear’s Picnic at RSPB Rainham Marshes

A special day at the Rainham marshes for the under 6′s. Bring your teddy and a picnic for a wondrous woodland adventure. Booking Essential. WEX members: £3.50, child non members: £5, adult members:
£1, adult non members: £3.50

Contact: Rainham.marshes@rspb.org.uk – 01708 899840
11 am-1 pm – RSPB Rainham Marshes Nature Reserve, New Tank Hill Road, Purfleet. RM19 1SZ

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Thursday 30th July

An Introduction to Transmission Meditation

Share International invite you to a simple group meditation providing both a dynamic service to the world and powerful, personal spiritual development.

Contact: 020 7482 1113
7-9pm – admission free – Friends House, 173 Euston Road, London NW1

Friday 31st July

Living roofs

This course will look at the why, how and what of living roofs and living roof installation. There is growing interest in the use of green roofs on buildings, and also a growing number of people who wish to do part or all of the installation themselves, with the least possible impact on the environment (in terms of materials) and of course on the pocket.

The course will be run by John Little of The Grass Roof Company, and Dusty Gedge of livingroofs.org and the Green Roof Consultancy.

Contact: Taryn 01296 714184
Friday 31st July to Sunday 2nd August

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Saturday 1st August

Green Economics Institute Conference

The clash between ecology and economy. Transformation at a time of economic crisis. Women’s unequal pay and poverty stream. Intra-generational equity. And an international range of speakers from 20 countries including Prof Graciela Chichilnisky, Columbia University and Dr Joseph Halevi, University de Nice, Sydney University. This conference on Green Economics must be pre-registered, pre-paid (£89 per day, concessions £39).

Contact: Miriam Kennet, 01189 841 026 – events@greeneconomicsinstitute.eu
Mansfield College – Friday and Saturday

Sunday 2nd August

Green Sunday @ The Dalston Mill

A family day out this Green Sunday in partnership with the Barbican Art Gallery. All welcome, drop in anytime.

3pm – 5pm : Workshops and Activities – ecoACTIVE sculpture workshop for kids of all ages – creating natural forms out of unnatural materials. Bike MOT check, SwapShop, Homemade Toiletries and Cake Decorating workshops

5pm – 7.30pm : Evening Entertainment – Afro-Brazilian percussion and Capoeira – Angola-Kabula performance and workshop. VoiCE – a young, female a cappella trio.

Contact: Owen Calvert-Lyons – owen@arcolatheatre.com
Entrance to The Dalston Mill by the Peace Mural on Dalston Lane, between Ashwin Street and Hartwell Street, E8
For the past few years now since the release of Verses of Comfort and Reassurance, cheapest I’ve been biding my time until I’m invited to join Au Revoir Simone, generic I’ve practised looking fey at a keyboard and I’ve got the fringe and floaty dresses sorted. Having not yet received the invite I satiated my lustily illustrious day-dreams of touring the world, sick dinners with David Lynch (number 1 Au Revoir Simone fan and a reoccurring odd but loveable sort of uncle figure in the dreams) and having tea together in striped t-shirts; by going to Proud Galleries on Saturday to see them play. So if you’re reading Au Revoir Simone: Call Me!

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First up though were Those Dancing Days, who simmered last summer with their single ‘Hitten’, a year on and now pushing the grand old age of 19, they have honed and matured their style a lot whilst retaining the fun exuberance of last year.

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The mix of Linnea Jonsson’s strong voice, the swirling Hammond organs and heady keyboards show a homage to Northern Soul and a talent beyond their years. Add to that mix some hooky bass and excellent drumming and KA-BLAM you’ve got yourself a unique take on the average girl with guitar set-up and a totally enjoyable live act. The song ‘Those Dancing Days’ was standout, spinning into a dizzying crescendo as the show’s finale.

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Au Revoir Simone quietly appear on stage, looking like the Lisbon sisters from the Virgin Suicides and assuming a rather Kraftwerk-ian set-up behind a line of keyboards.

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This mix sort of sets a format for their show; an ethereal aesthetic grounded by musical ability and lots of gadgets.

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Dressed in white, there is something rather ghostly and transparent about the girls, as a stream of surreal and dreamy images are projected onto them. They mostly play songs from their latest offering ‘Still Night, Still Light’ which is more synth heavy and creepy than their previous two albums.

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The new material translates well live with songs like ‘Knight of Wands’ and ‘All or Nothing’ having a danceable crunchiness and thumping bass to them which was an exciting departure from their space-y mellowness of their studio work.

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Unlike the dreamy spontaneity I had imagined; there was a definite structure to their arrangement as they bounce and refract of each other in a triangle of music, which was particularly lovely on old favourite ‘Sad Song’.

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They were charming, surprising and entrancing in equal measure and if David Lynch is a fan then so am I!

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London has more galleries and art spaces than I’ve had hot dinners. New exhibition territories crop up on a seemingly regular basis, discount from the smart addresses in Mayfair to the warehouse lofts of the East End. But none have been more fantasy fulfilling than Regent Park’s new Treehouse Gallery, sale based down by the banks of the Boating Lake and acting as a hub for some inspiring and ethically sound creativity throughout July and August, in the form of workshops, talks, events, performances and events. Such attractions will include flower clocks and floating gardens; a walk in camera obscura; weaving and basketry classes; live painting and shadow puppetry; a solar powered tea station; a medicine garden; a delicious tree-flavoured ice cream parlour; recycled puppetry and shadow play; tree-top dancing and live instrument installations.

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Photo by Henry Adams

Self sufficient, self funded and carefully designed to work in harmony with it’s surroundings, the site is as environmentally thumbs up as it gets. The groups involved in the project are predominantly concerned with promoting a respect for the natural environment and with accordance with The Royal Park’s Tree Officer and the RoSPA, they have ensured that the venture leaves no damage in it’s wake once it is disassembled in September. The trees supporting the ‘rooms’ are specifically selected for their durability and strength; even the time of year has been considered carefully for minimal wildlife disruption. Independent organisations participating include HighLife TreeHouses, specialists in tree house design; Monkey-Do, tree-climbing and rigging experts; BASH, nature sensitive events organisors; Arcadiam Associates, structural engineers; Bosky Trees, arboricultural and ecology experts; Ob:Lab, social networking through suspended structures and the Area10 project space. There is an established charity presence too, with the gallery collaborating with a range of well-known charities such as D-Art (Shape), St Mungos and School Friend Etc. Artists and organisations including the likes of Space Studios, Temporary School of Thought, Bicycology, The House of Fairytales and The School of Everything will punctuate the site with evolving and spontaneous curatorial programmes.

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Photograph by Joseph Bloor

The structures are predominantly built from naturally sourced materials and reclaimed city waste. All timber and building materials are being donated to the project and are guaranteed lightweight, un-pressure treated and free from chemicals that corrupt the soil. The gallery will be fuelled by onsite renewable energy and transport will be kept to a minimum, where possible taking the form of bicycle and other alternative modes of transportation. Furthermore marketing materials and waste produced on site are being reused through specific art workshops and installations that reinvent the discarded. grass roots city dwelling initiatives, willow weaving, carpentry, protest site techniques, contemporary construction practices, tree netting and creative methods of re-using; a reflection of the various alternative narratives that inform our cultural resources and practices.

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Photo by Sarah Bush

The brains behind the collaboration are Claudia Moseley and Steph Smith, who between them have experience in revamping dis-used spaces, tree protesting and woodland protection, light installations and projects with DA! and The Temporary School of Thought. They name their inspirations to be an ‘ongoing dialogue with nature and experiences of innovation’, which rings true for and has attracted the support and skills of emerging as well as established artists, crafty folk, activists, specialists in architecture and permaculture to mention a few. Additional participators and co-conspirators include Sarah Bush and Anshu Asthana, who work under the name ‘The Art is in the Tea’ producing delicious elderflower champagne and nettle ale. Others include Theo Brown, Franni Donnohoe, Will Lasslett, Jude Lamb, Kieran Metcalf, Edward Shuster, Mike Shuster, Oliver Shuster, and Miriam Waltz.

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‘Franni Donnohoe and the Birds’ Photo by Sarah Bush

The main viewing platform is a trio of ‘growths’ nestled high up in a triangular series of trees. Bridges and walkways link these pods, which have been especially created by architects Henry Adams and Oliver Ogilvie. Consideration for the less able bodied as well as those who are auditorily and visually impaired has remain a top priority for the designers, and the activities have been planned with their needs in mind. The Budding Hub Gallery is the epicentre of the goings on, resembling a germinating bulb and built from donated end-of-season hazel and willow wood. Next up is the Box Galleries, stacked cube-shaped spaces which can be explored via a network of staircases. Netted walkways lead off these exhibits to playful hanging pods and the more contemplative Spherical Reading Gallery, which as the name might suggest is a ‘circular space that houses hundreds of bark bound books’ which rather smartly form ‘part of the inverted trunk’ when slotted back into the shelf. Titles covering all kinds of topics from ways to living, alternate worlds, philosphies and mythologies can be found here and are unique to the project.

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‘The Art is in the Tea’ Photo by Sarah Bush

There is a strong social element to the initiative. What is clever about the whole concept is that while aesthetically The TreeHouse Gallery will be a piece of art in it’s own right, the space will also become a metaphor for the collective learning and growing of it’s visitors and contributors. The project aims to act as a type of socially cohesive glue, bringing together and joining up sections of society and community that wouldn’t ordinarily cross paths. As way of a manifesto the Treehouse Gallery state “The project will embrace socially inclusive art practices and a wide reaching approach to community engagement; highlighting social and cultural diversity and varied access needs.”

Like all good things that must come to an end, the Treehouse Gallery has a shelf life and will be reinvented and recycled come the end of August. So I urge to go and catch this collaboration while you can, for such well principled and innovatively executed projects are few and far between.

Gallery opening times: 10am – 4pm Weekdays
10am – 8pm Fridays and Saturdays and Sundays

Categories ,Environmental Art, ,London, ,Regent’s Park, ,Treehouse Gallery

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Amelia’s Magazine | Turn Le Page onto a New Vision of Femininity: Catherine Le Page.

The eponymous release from New York based The Pains of Being Pure at Heart has everything you could want from a summer album. A certain been-in-the-sun-too-long hazy-headyness without the too-much-ice-cream sugariness of many indie-pop summer albums. No-No! I’m rallying for The Pains of Being Pure at Heart being trail-blazers for a new genre we shall call ‘Sandalgaze” aka Shoegaze for when it’s not raining out.

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From the rip-roaring opener ‘Contender’, buy more about the album manages to be catchy without being twee, shop noise without being dreary, imagine My Bloody Valentine on a beach doo-wopping and you’re halfway there.
Whilst treading this line The Pains of Being Pure at Heart consistently avoid being schmaltzy. The track; Young Adult Friction is danceable, its lyrics of a whimsy worthy of Stuart Murdoch yet reflect on themes like first love with a sort of yearning nostalgia, again souring the sweetness. Here the oft-overdone boy/girl singing duo is slightly off-kilter and the effect is more reminiscent of early Yo La Tengo or Jesus and Mary Chain than Belle & Sebastian.

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The Pains of Being Pure of Heart is definitely tinged with nods towards the 80s and early 90s,yet it is perhaps too easy to criticise the album for this. The band manage to utilise certain stylistic tropes without being too retrospective or shallow.
In fact The Pains of Being Pure at Heart is refreshing in it’s redefinition of certain preconceptions: summer isn’t all about whistling and tambourine jangling anymore and Shoegaze is reinterpreted with a sunny touch rather like enjoying a 99 flake with Kevin Shields!

The album ‘The Pains of Being Pure at Heart’ is available now and the single ‘Young Adult Friction’ is released on 18th May (Fortuna Pop!)
They play The Lexington, London on 15th May

Kitsuné has really got its groove on this time. Left eyebrows are often tilted to a 74-degree angle at the mention of a Parisian fashion boutique that puts out compilation CDs, symptoms amongst other music releases. At first, tadalafil you kind of expect endless Dimitri From Paris types churning out catwalk-flavoured lint, but Kitsuné really knows what it is getting, and won’t be holding onto the receipt. With utter confidence and bravado, you see, it was Kitsuné that released Wolfmother’s ball-busting old-metal limited edition EP. Benetton scratches its head in confusion.
For all that, Compilation 7 is a danceable disc, with lots of European disco-beats, and plenty of fruity basslines in the Frenchified Electro style. But it’s not the kind of thoughtless, juvenile poppy end of it. You won’t hear anything approaching “Lady, give me tonight, cos my feeling is just so right”, since the Maison-people (Maisonettes?) are clued up. They listen to Tangerine Dream and Elvis Costello, and anything they select from the here and now is selected with a certainty that reminds me of the chap who picks the leaves for PG Tips: He just knows where the good stuff’s at.
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Highpoints include Chateau Marmont’s Beagle, filled with synths fresh from Tomorrow’s World demonstrations, sidewinding through arpeggiated chords, with the occasional crash-bang with a wooden spoon by the stove, and Beni’s Fringe Element, which popcorns along with hi-hats before going to a thoroughly spiffing hiatus of slap bass with one of the squidgiest, wiggly-wormiest synth solos since Mr.Scruff’s Shrimp. Probably the most exciting track here is Crystal Fighters’ (above) Xtatic Truth, a journey involving Epic-Ragga-Happy-Hardcore, hints of Chinese Folk, and a choir of the ether.
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But it’s a plentiful CD. There are nineteen songs, in all, and although everything chugs along to the metronomic pulse of cubase, there is pacing and variety to the beast overall. Gentle relief comes best of all in This Sweet Love by James Yuill (above), as remixed by Prins Thomas, a ponderous chillscape based on the warmest fingerpicking, and an embrace of vocals. You will feel truly hugged. And once you’ve digested it all, you can take that lovely warm glow on the Eurostar with you, and buy yourself the bestest clothes (I’m not a fashion writer, actually) in all Pareeee!

You can buy the Maison’s goodies at www.kitsune.fr or at their myspace.
If you are a university student, online what do you make of your schools environmental policies? Do they even have green policies to speak of? This week, the students of the University of Arts London have been bringing environmental issues to the forefront, and discussing the various ways that both themselves, their campuses and the courses themselves can be more environmentally aware.

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The Go Green Week, also known as Green: The New Black has been running for the last few days and culminates in talks and workshops on Friday, that include Fashion Forward: Creating an Ethical Label between 4pm-6pm RHS East Space, LCF, John Princes Street
which asks: “How can you create a label that looks good, but is also good to the environment?” ECCA and the Centre for Sustainable Fashion present fashion design businesses that are sustainable throughout from their manufacturing processes and materials, to marketing methods that aim communicate and promote their ethical processes to their customers.
Also on Friday afternoon at LCC is the meeting “Students Going Green” –top of the agenda are the following points “Fed up with the lack of recycling at your College? … Want sustainability on the curriculum? … Think Arts London should GO GREEN?” Speaking with the Press Officers of the Student Union, I learnt that a large number of students have voiced their concerns over this topic. The recycling issue specifically has been on ongoing and much debated subject. Many students feel that not enough is being done to provide facilities to recycle. The Green Charter laid out by the Student Union demands that “Sufficient recycling facilities should be available at all Arts London Sites and all Halls of Residence, with consideration also given to specialist recycling e.g. textiles, wood at relevant sites.”

Also on the agenda is for the issues of sustainability to feature more heavily in the Universities curriculum, either in the form of specific modules, or integrated as a whole, and for the campuses to switch to a green energy provider. The student union also explained that they are setting up an “Ethical and Environmental assembly” that will set future Go Green Assembly’s. They have also been encouraging students to sign a petition that is campaigning for a greener Arts London. Realising that strong visuals are the best way to get the point across, the students were asked to be photographed with the green charter and upload their pictures to the blog. An example would be these brave folks.

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Learning about the concerted efforts to raise environmental awareness amongst students started me wondering how other universities and student bodies broach this subject. As this is a topic that is dear to our heart, we would love your input on whether your schools and universities are committed to the environmental cause, and if so, do you feel that they are doing enough? . Tell us more at hello@ameliasmagazine.com and maybe we can help to highlight the issue.
Be featured in this limited edition anthology of the best new illustrators engaged in environmental thinking. Read on to find out more…

***Please note that this brief is now closed: you can now order a copy of this book online by clicking here***

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an illustration by Laura-Maria Arola from issue 9 of Amelia’s Magazine

Now, malady anyone who is following me on Twitter – my new favourite thing in the whole world – will know that I asked my dad to do the research for this book. I know what he’s like – apart from being a typical male who loves nothing more than “disappearing down the rabbit-hole” as my mum calls it (also known as busying himself in new projects) – he also loves a challenge. So I asked him to dig up some info on all the most obscure new alternative technologies currently being explored, sale so that I could put together a brief for Amelia’s Anthology of Illustration.

He rose to the challenge and then some… almost immediately I started receiving email updates on strange new ways of producing energy. But not only that… it seems I have been the unwitting catalyst for a whole new venture – or a whole new rabbit warren to explore, depending on your point of view. A trained if somewhat out of practice scientist, Bruce (that’s my dad, I know, wierd, I call him by his first name)- gleefully told me on Bank Holiday Monday that he’s just designed the best new wave power technology not yet invented. Having read nearly 2000 patents for various wave power technologies he has, in his inimitable way, decided that his idea is quite clearly the best (my dad ALWAYS knows best). Except he won’t share it with me, cos I might, like, post it on the internet or something, before he’s applied for a patent.

Still, exciting stuff, and just the kind of thing I hope to do more of with both this open brief and the resulting book that comes out of it. Amelia’s Magazine in print may be no more, but I could never leave print entirely, and so the idea for this book has been mulling around in my head for sometime now. What we need right now is a whole heap of imagination, because humans need to make a big leap forward if we want to get out of the mess we currently find ourselves in. And whilst the scientists and boffins of this world busy themselves with the minutae of complicated chemical reactions and intricate moving parts, we also need the skills of artists to make these technologies a concrete reality. Without both visions together we will continue to move at a snail’s slither, so my aim is to help quicken that pace. If I can inspire designers and illustrators to better consider the way their energy is produced by drawing alternatives, then maybe they will make better choices about where their own energy comes from. Of course I don’t believe that technology alone is a cure all for all our ills, but it’s a move in the right direction, and I aim to produce a book that provides a comprehensive resource of all the best new illustrators capable of engaging with environmental issues and envisaging future alternative energy sources.

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an illustration by Allan Deas for issue 9 of Amelia’s Magazine

What will be in Amelia’s Anthology of Illustration ?
The book will be a compendium of profiles on the best illustrators who submit to this brief. Anyone is eligible to submit work, from anywhere in the world. I would particularly encourage new illustrators; those who are still at college, just graduating, or new to the field. Amelia’s Magazine is used by many influential creatives looking for new talent to employ, and this will be an even better way of getting your work noticed globally.

What will the book look like?
The book will be the same dimensions as Amelia’s Magazine, thereby sitting nicely on the shelf with any copies of the magazine that purchasers might already possess! It will be designed in a similar fashion but also expect some new ideas.

When will it be published and where will it be sold?
Amelia’s Anthology of Illustration will be self-published (again!!!!) The lead-times are just too long with the big publishers, plus they would want more design control than I am prepared to give to them. The ones I have spoken to also insist on producing all their books in the Far East, something I am very uncomfortable with given the dodgy environmental credentials of many industrial operations in that part of the world. It will be produced in the UK by Principal Colour as a limited edition hardback towards the end of 2009, in time for Christmas. Advance orders should be available to purchase on my website by the end of the summer, and will be much appreciated in order to finance the production process as it is going to cost me much more to keep production in the UK. The book will be sold worldwide at specialist art book shops such as those that already stock the magazine. I will aim to produce a second (possibly softback) edition the following year to be made much more widely available.

What can I do to contribute?
I need a number of different artworks from aspiring contributors, so please read the following information carefully and make sure that your submissions meet the criteria before you send them in to me.

Submission criteria

EXCLUSIVE WORK: produced specifically for AMELIA’S ANTHOLOGY OF ILLUSTRATION

1. Most importantly:
ONE EXCLUSIVE LARGE PIECE done specifically for this anthology and not featured anywhere else.

This should feature an alternative technology that has not yet been built or mass-produced in any great scale. NO RUN-OF-THE-MILL WINDMILLS AND SOLAR PANELS PLEASE!

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an intriguing design for a line of windmills on a bouncing rod

This is a challenging theme, but thanks to my dad there are dozens of links below that will lead you off in the right direction. You will need to disappear down the rabbit hole for awhile for this brief requires time and thought to complete. It also requires huge amounts of imagination, which is what illustrators specialise in! And my dad! I’ve always held a belief that the scientific mind and the artistic mind are not really so different from each other. How else do you explain me? The child of two scientists?! but rubbish at science….

Anyway, I digress. In this illustration I want to see ways that a new technology would be integrated into our future lives… so interaction with the surroundings or people will be good. This is not a technical illustration, it’s an aspirational one, but you should imagine this technology in some detail, however fantastical it may be. You could even look back at technologies that were patented as far ago as the 1800s, but that have never become part of the mainstream. Your chosen technology should be the main focus of your whole picture, but don’t forget to add detail.
This should be accompanied by a short written piece describing why you picked this particular technology and what the illustration means to you. This should be no more than 300 words.

A word to the wise: the more obscure your choice of technology the better, since I will probably choose different technologies for each illustrator that I choose to profile.
You can choose to work in two sizes:
Double page (as was used in Amelia’s Magazine)
SIZE: page size: 400mm wide x 245mm high, with a bleed of 3mm all around; ie. final size of your artwork: 406mm x 251mm.
or
Single page
SIZE: page size: 200mm wide x 245mm high, with a bleed of 3mm all around; ie. final size of your artwork: 206mm x 251mm.
NOTE: Don’t put important stuff in the 3mm bleed zone (but do continue your image into it) as this is where the printers may cut bits off when the magazine is cut and bound.
RESOLUTION: 300dpi, as a photoshop file in CYMK mode, using Photoshop print profile: euro standard swap coated 20% (or euroscale V2)
GUTTER: please also note that the book will have a very deep gutter in the middle so it is good to keep important parts of your illustration away from the centre of the spread in double page images.
MY STYLE: if you want to know about my taste in illustration you should check out the current issue of the mag, or buy a back issue here!

2. A exclusive PICTORIAL LOGO on an environmental theme

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Logo designed by Adrian Fleet for Climate Camp in the City at the G20 protests

If you have submitted something for the Climate Camp logo open brief then you would be able to resubmit it for this brief, irrespective of whether it was used or not. The logo could be for an event or a company or a product or anything at all, but it must be promoting environmental themes and ideas. I will be looking for colourful and engaging logos. Consider the work of Adrian Fleet for the G20 Climate Camp in the City logo when thinking about what to enter for this. My style tends to be maximalist, but the words must always be a bold and easy part of the logo to read. It could be work that you have already created and has already been used by a brand (though please check with them before sending it to me) or you could create a new piece of work for a real or fictional brand. It should encompass a creative use of typography with illustration. There will be plenty of food for thought amongst the alternative technologies you will already have researched.
This should be accompanied by a short written piece describing what the logo has or would be used for. 50 words max.
It can be any size, but please create work at 300 dpi to a largish size.

3. Typography: YOUR NAME!
Please create your name in the most imaginative way possible. This could be done by hand, or on a computer, but you should really go to town! Amelia’s Magazine is well known for the use of creative typography, and for Amelia’s Anthology of Illustration the floor is open to you to create your own type for your own name (or how you would like to be known professionally) Don’t think of it as branding, but as something to go to town with. If your work is chosen it will be used to head your page, and it should therefore be really creative and fun. Think of this as your chance to really grab the reader’s attention!
For this reason please work to these dimensions and no smaller. (it could be bigger)
SIZE: 200-400mm wide x 40mm high
RESOLUTION: 300dpi, as a photoshop file in CYMK mode, using Photoshop print profile: euro standard swap coated 20% (or euroscale V2)

4. A Border
Again this should fit a single page and reflect an environmental theme. Be sure to work with 3mm bleed and no more than 25mm in from the edge.
SIZE: page size: 200mm wide x 245mm high, with a bleed of 3mm all around; ie. final size of your artwork: 206mm x 251mm.
NOTE: Don’t put important stuff in the 3mm bleed zone (but do continue your border into it) as this is where the printers may cut bits off when the magazine is cut and bound.
RESOLUTION: 300dpi, as a photoshop file in CYMK mode, using Photoshop print profile: euro standard swap coated 20% (or euroscale V2)

NON EXCLUSIVE work:
4. Two other bits of illustration.

These should be your best recent work. They do not necessarily need to be on an environmental theme but should showcase as wide a range of imagery as possible, eg. people, things, places, typography etc. If you have created artwork for any of my previous open briefs this could form part of your submission although I would prefer to see new work. Be sure to stick to one style though – illustrators with a strong style of their own will always make the biggest mark, and I am unlikely to pick anyone who does not show a strong style throughout their submissions.
These can be any size, but please label each illustration clearly with a name and date of creation.
SIZE: as big as possible to fit the book’s page sizes.
RESOLUTION: 300dpi, as a photoshop file in CYMK mode, using Photoshop print profile: euro standard swap coated 20% (or euroscale V2)

CLOSING DATE: Monday 3rd August, by midnight please.
Please send lo res versions of your images (saved for web) to info@ameliasmagazine.com in an email clearly marked ANTHOLOGY OF ILLUSTRATION so that I don’t lose sight of it in my inbox if I am rushing through things on the day it arrives.
(This should be 6 pieces of work altogether. PLEASE DON’T SEND MORE THAN THIS)

If you are chosen for inclusion in Amelia’s Anthology of Illustration then you will be notified shortly after this date, once I have made my decisions. I have yet to decide how I will put together the profiles, but I may well need a photo from you and a short interview. If this is the case you will be notified later on in the summer.
And if you have any questions that are not answered above then please email me for clarification.
Join the facebook event here to ensure you get updates as they happen.

Best wishes and happy drawing!

Links
Below is a very long list of links, courtesy of Bruce: this is by no means conclusive, and the technologies may never work, but they are all being explored and would be valid ideas to illustrate. Youtube and Google Images are both a great source of innovative technologies, and I am sure you can find more. Feel free to go off and google you heart out – but you must illustrate something real and possible, and not a fantasy idea of your own. (unless you are also a scientist of course)

Wind turbines

Wikipedia wind power info

Magenn’s revolutionary wind power system on youtube

Magenn Air Rotar system

Magenn’s home page

The Floating Balloon Wind Generator

Motorwind Camping Set Wind Turbine

Knex wind turbine

Magnetically Levitated wind turbine

Great pic of huge Maglev wind turbine

Wikipedia entry about Maglev wind turbines

Maglev wind turbines homepage

Mag-Wind Vertical Axis Turbine

A Flying Wind Machine!

Floating Wind Turbines

A great blog about lots of different alternative energy projects including wierd and fantastical wind turbines

Huge Kites

Optiwind accelerating turbine

Selsam superturbines

Rotating wind power towers

Broadstar’s Aerocam

FloDesign wind turbines

Wikipedia definition of airborne wind turbines

downloadable PDF containing interesting info about different types of airborne wind turbines

Wikipedia definition of Kitegen

Kitegen website – plans for a huge airborne wind farm!

Great picture of how kites could generate electricity

Guardian article about kite power

Video showing how a kite ladder would work

Makani Power high altitude wind kites

Google have put money into the Makani vision

Makani “wind dam” picture

Great article about Saul Griffith — wind energy entrepeneur, and president of Makani

Tom Van Sant makes amazing kite ladders as sculpture

Wind Harvesting farms

Helix Wind

More Helix Wind porn

Google search results for wind power technologies

Mariah Power wind turbines

Google videos about wind power

The huge offshore aerogenerator

Quiet Revolution wind turbines

Wave power

Oscillating water columns

Anaconda wave technology

SIE-CAT wave energy accumulator

A list of wave power patents going back to the 1800s

Danish Wave Energy Society

the Wave Dragon

Wave Star Energy

Wave Energy Centre

CWave Power

the Aegir Dynamo

CETO

Columbia Power

Float wave electric power station

the Manchester Bobber

Orecon oscillating water column

OE Buoy

Aquamarine power

Sperboy wave energy converter

SSG Concept

The Seadog Pump

Buoys technology

Floating power plant

Surf Power

Power Buoy

the Wave Roller

Langlee Wave Power

the WRASPA

video about Harnessing the Gulf Stream! (is this a good idea?)

Wikipedia entry about wave power

Pelamis on wikipedia

Pelamis wave power

Pelamis being tested in Portugal

Google videos on wave power

Biowave power system

video showing Biowave power working

Video – giant rubber snakes!

SRI wave powered generator

Ocean Power Technologies

video – Aqua Buoys

Aqua Buoy movie

Oyster wave power

Tidal power

Wikipedia on tidal power

Video – tidal wave energy

youtube – idea for tidal energy barrage in florida

Sea Gen

google video links for Sea Gen

Marine Current Turbines

video of Biostream tidal power system

Gorlov helical water turbine on wikipedia

Gorlov Helical Turbine

3D interactive model that shows blades of Gorlov turbine

Severn Barrage

Solar Energy

Wikipedia on solar energy

Thermal

wikipedia on thermal solar energy

wikipedia on solar energy generating systems

wikipedia on solar power tower

BBC news report on solar power stations

Solar Power tower in Spain

image of Solar Power tower

more images of solar power tower in spain

Bright Source solar power on wikipedia

Bright Source Energy

Solar Reserve

youtube on solar tower energy

solar tower energy in spain on youtube

Enviromission solar tower

Suncatchers

Dual axis solar tower structure

Voltaic

photovoltaic energy

youtube on israeli solar energy

First Solar free field power plants

youtube about plastic solar cells producing solar power

Konarka power plastic

Standard geothermal

Geothermal power on wikipedia

youtube geothermal energy vid

Enhanced geothermal

Wikipedia – enhanced geothermal systems

youtube video on enhanced geothermal systems

Hot Rock Technology

Alta Rock Energy

Petratherm

Geodynamics
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The Reluctant Photojournalist

Features a variety of vintage and modern prints from Werner Bischof’s well known humanitarian photography including the Bihar famine, more about Europe post WWII and the South Korean war. Alongside these sit Bischof’s equally beautiful but perhaps lesser known early experiments with abstracts and nudes.

Photographic co-op Magnum Photos Ground Floor, 63 Gee Street, London EC1V 3RS, 0207 490 1771
Free Entry
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re.orient.ate

Reorienting common notions of contemporary Arab art and lifestyle and debunking ‘Orientalist’ depictions. Arab artists Marianne Catzaras, Dora Dhouib and Wael Shawky explore themes of mass media, Diaspora and religion via film and photography.

Selma Feriani Gallery, 23 Maddox Street, Mayfair, London W1S 2QN
7th Apr – 13th May 2009
Free entry
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The Abyss

A new joint exhibition by former Wimbledon College of Art students, Nicola Stead and Dan Jupp.

The Outside World, 44 Redchurch Street, London E2 7DP
7th May – 13th May By appointment Thursday to Saturday
Free entry
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The Hiding Place

Lewis Chamberlain
Exquisitely rendered pencil drawings whisk the viewer away into muted landscapes
which toy with scale, suburbia and the surreal.

James Hyman Gallery Savile Row, London W1S 3PD, 020 7494 3857
30th April – 30th May
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Crafted
Contemporary Craft and Fine Art

An exhibition celebrating the materials, processes and techniques involved in making extraordinary objects, the exhibition will feature nine artists from different arts and craft and design fields.

Oriel Myrddin Gallery, Church Lane, Carmarthen SA31 1LH
4th Apr – 16th May 09, 10 – 5 Mon – Sat
Free entry
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Monday 11 May

Telepathe are a too-cool-for-school three piece from Brooklyn. They’re playing 93 Feet East. They get obtuse Krautronica and make it go “POP!” – maybe they’ll be the next Animal Collective… Supported by Ou Est Le Swimming Pool.
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Tuesday 12 May

Dan Mangan plays The Electroacoustic Club, salve housed at The Slaughtered Lamb, viagra Clerkenwell. He’s a heartfelt songwriting kind of guy, information pills sings like he means it, and he’s much better than that Elbow record. Support comes from Deer Park.
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Wednesday 13 May

Our new favourite boyfriend-girlfriend duettists, Young Paul, will be giving The Cobden Club, 107 Kensal road a taste of 80s electronic treats. get in touch with the band for hassle-free entry, as it’s a private members club. Not just a fine gig, then, but also a chance to see where the Old Etonians schmooze.

Thursday 14 May

Alice and The Cool Dudes at Barden’s Boudoir. This is the high point of our music week. Alice Grant of Fulborn Teversham, is leaving her jazzhead buddies to one side to unveil some pensive indie songs, delivered by a totally unique voice that totters across a tightrope of uncannily powerful and tearful exhaustion. Surely she won’t disappoint?????
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Friday 15 May

Up in Nottingham, North-East London’s finest jokeshop salesmen of parallel-universe, narrative ska will be testing out some new material where they think no one can hear them. If you can find a place called Demo, you must prove Hothead Show wrong. Prepare for shockingly tight wizardry of the jerky-jerky groove.
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Saturday 16 May

A night of so-angry-we-can-only-tell-you-very-very-slowly Metal, with some catatonically droning Grunge, and atonal noise that may cause loss of balance on all but the lowest of seating. Roll up at The Constitution and enjoy Dethscalator, Scul Hazzards and Batrider. If you don’t take earplugs, then take cotton wool to mop up you bleeding lugholes.

Sunday 17 May

Always a good bet for a sunday night is Cross Kings, 126 York Way, in King’s Cross. On the ground level, David Goo will jolly along an open mic, which always has a few very eccentric envelope-pushers pencilled in. The avant-gardishness couples nicely with the family warmth, houmous and pitta that makes this a great pub. It’s worth paying a few quid to be allowed into the basement also. Things are a bit more organized (sound-checks and everything) but happily, there’s still no obvious divide between the musicians and the audience. What sundays are for.

Tuesday 12th May

Climate (Mis)behaviour
7pm
Dana Center
The Science Museum’s Dana Centre, dosage
?165 Queen’s Gate?, sildenafil
South Kensington
?London?SW7 5HD
?talk@danacentre.org.uk
+0044 (0)207 942 4040

Rescuing the planet requires behavioural change on an unprecedented scale. From individual action to global politics, what are the different strategies attempting to achieve this? Social psychology, advertising, policy and direct action are all thrown into the mix in this debate. ??This event is trying out a new format called Policy Slam, which is funded by the Democratic Innovation Fund of the Ministry of Justice. With the help of the experts, you will discuss, present and vote on several different options.

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Illustration by Lea Jaffy

Wednesday 13th May
Morphic Resonance, Collective Memory and Habits of Nature – An evening with Rupert Sheldrake

6.30pm drinks & buffet at Gaia House, 
(18 Well Walk, Hampstead, NW3 1LD)

7.30pm Talk & discussion at Burgh House 
(Opposite Gaia House, New End Square, Hampstead, NW3 1LT)

When Rupert Sheldrake first put forward his idea of Morphic Resonance more than twenty years ago, it caused a great stir in the scientific community.  The Editor of Nature denounced it as “the best candidate for burning there has been for many years” and proclaimed that it was “heresy”.  In his recently published new edition, available on the evening, Rupert documents the evidence that has built up in support of this hypothesis.  He will reflect on the Human Genome Project and other reductionist ideas, where few of the grand claims have come to fruition, not unlike the economic bubble that has recently burst.
 
The paradigm shift that Morphic Resonance offers is coherent with the Gaia Hypothesis, where the cosmos is understood to be a developing organism, where nature is alive, interconnected and creative.  There is an inherent memory in nature, and evolution is an interplay of habit and creativity, like our own lives.  According to this way of seeing formative causation, all self-organising systems, including crystals, plants and animals contain an inherent memory, given by a process called morphic resonance from previous similar systems.  
 
These ideas also resonate with diverse indigenous traditions around the world, including those of European ancestry.  For much of our history humans have experienced our relationship with the Earth, and indeed the Universe, to be fluid and reciprocal.  Rupert has taken up the challenge of exploring this ancient wisdom thorough the modern scientific tradition.
You can reserve your place online at: www.gaiafoundation.org/learning/online.php
Or send  a cheque for £10, made payable to The Gaia Foundation.

For further details please contact Sarah at: sarahn@gaianet.org or 020 7428 0055.
 
Rupert Sheldrake is recognised as one of the world’s most innovative biologists.  He was a Fellow of Clare College, Cambridge, and a Research Fellow of the Royal Society, and is currently Director of the Perrott-Warrick Project.  He is author of more than 80 scientific papers in peer-reviewed journals and many books, including ‘The Presence of the Past’,  ‘The Sense of Being Stared At’, ‘Dogs That Know When Their Owners Are Coming Home’  and  ‘Chaos, Creativity and Cosmic Consciousness’. His web site is www.sheldrake.org

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llustration by Eco Labs

Thursday 14th May
TAKE BACK THE POWER!? THE IMPORTANCE OF DIRECT ACTION TODAY

6:30-9pm
?Amnesty International UK
Human Rights Action Centre?
17 – 25 New Inn Yard
London EC2A 3EA
Nearest tube: Old Street

Free entry, refreshments and snacks provided
RSVP: london@climatecamp.org.uk or call 07534 598 733 (Early booking recommended!)
Find out what YOU can DO to stop climate change.?Throughout history ordinary people have been responsible for all major social changes – women’s rights, civic rights and even democracy itself in many places can be said to be result of direct action. Taking action is the very first step in making big changes happen. Direct action is taken by people who feel that the political process is not working to address profoundly important issues.
Climate change is the most urgent challenge we’ve ever faced – and politicians are not showing the strength of character needed to actually address this problem. Instead of serious sustainable solutions we see new runways and new coal fired power stations- deals that benefit the bottom line of the big players and not the wider population. Climate Camp believes that people everywhere need to work out what they can do – and then do it. Taking action yourself to make the world you want to see is a logical response to a very serious situation.

Are you interested in doing more to highlight the urgency of climate change? Or the relevance of direct action to struggles for jobs, peace and justice? Are you intrigued but feel uncomfortable about going outside the mainstream political process? Would you consider getting involved but don’t know how? Are you nervous about the consequences?
‘Take Back the Power! The Importance of Direct Action Today’ will be unique opportunity to hear about direct action from people who have participated in different ways. Speakers will range from people on the front line to those helping in the background. This includes Deborah Grayson – one of the Parliament Climate Rush – who is on bail and will be speaking about Climate Rush (photgraphed below)
To reserve a place/s please RSVP to london@climatecamp.org.uk or call 07534 598 733.

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Photograph by Amelia Gregory

Saturday 16th May
Euroflashmob: Europe United Against Airport Expansion
Stop Airport Expansion

Saturday 16 May 2009. The day of the Eurovision Song Contest. 12 noon on the dot at Heathrow
Terminal 1 Departures. Join Heathrow Flashmobbers in a Europe-wide Flash Mob – taking place on the same day at 6 airports across Europe.
Flash Heathrow! Flash Paris! Flash Frankfurt! Flash Schipol! Flash Brussels! Flash Dublin!
Each flashmob will be singing Eurovision classics (song-sheets provided), so download your favourite eurovision song onto your ipod or phone and bring your friends, instruments, hats, wigs, and your dancing shoes and let’s party. Now for the serious bit: airport expansion is seriously bad for local people, increased noise, air pollution, and especially the climate. The aviation industry want to expand airports across the UK and Europe, but opposition is huge, and the scientists are telling us we have to drastically cut emissions if we are to beat climate change. Flashmobs are a fun way to highlight the real opposition there is to expansion at airports across Europe. Here’s another big chance to show our opposition to a 3rd runway at Heathrow.
See you in Heathrow Terminal 1 Departures at 12 noon on the dot!
Tell BAA to get in tune: No Third Runway.
www.euroflashmob.com

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Illustration by Sachiko

Green Wedge II
A major Green Party benefit gig, to aid the Euro Election campaign.

£5 entry.
Venue:
Pangea Project
72 Stamford Hill,
Stoke Newington,
N16 6XS

http://www.pangeaproject.co.uk/

The highly eclectic lineup includes:
The Refinements (Raucous Ska)
Sarah Ellen Hughes Duo (jazz singer)

Contacts:
Selim: 07853 725476
Come along and support the local bands by cheering loudly, the Green Party by giving us your money and support, and the Pangea Project by drinking copious amounts.
It’s all shaping up to be a fun night, ably facilitated by your host Matt Hanley (ahem), with comprehensive Eurovision updates throughout the evening!
You can buy advance tickets here:?http://www.skiddle.com/tickets/
I love good days. Days that unfold in a series of pleasant surprises that put a spring back in your step and remind you that the world can be a good place. Three such things occurred today, buy well, four if you include the free coffee I was given for no reason, and five if you take into account the particularly magnificent texture of the water in which I swam early this morning (a good start surely), breathing fresh and clean from the night’s rain, silk to the touch and causing my skin to tingle for hours after; but silk water aside, only one of these things is relevant to you Zach, can I call you Zach?

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There was a moment at tonight’s concert where you clasped your fingers behind your head, raised your eyes towards the ceiling, and sighed a private smile – do you sometimes not quite believe it? I couldn’t believe it. I’d given up the hope of seeing you (you the object of a little musical infatuation), play at the Forum tonight – a torment when that venue is within spitting distance of my home. I’d cycled past and seen the queues outside (one of the nicest looking crowds to gather outside the Forum, believe me I know), my head hung low and my pedal stilted, perhaps I could sneak in, how could I live here so long and not know a secret entrance? Just as I was reconciling myself to a night of listening to Gulag Orchestra within the confines of my bedroom and strumming Postcards from Italy alone on the roof, a good thing happened – buzz buzz in my back pocket.

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“Hey Luisa how are you?”
“I’ve been better, well actually it’s been a pretty good day, but – ”
“Yeah well listen, you like Beirut right?”
“Like them? I Love – I mean yeah, they’re ok. I guess they’re ok.”
“Well you couldn’t do me a favour. I know it’s late notice and you’ve probably got plans”
“Erm, yeah I’ve got plans”
“Well I’m supposed to be reviewing them tonight but they wouldn’t give me a plus one and I don’t want to go alone, you wouldn’t go instead would you?”
(I’ve pulled over and am silently raising my fists to the sky)
Hmm…I suppose I could, I mean I would like to see them but then I don’t know what I’d write, I’m sure I’ll think of something-”
“So you’ll go?”
“Yes, yes I’ll go.”
“Oh great, thanks, just say you’re me, get some pictures, you know the drill, thanks again,”
“No problem, really,” (jumping up and down a little bit),
“What’s that noise?”
“Oh, nothing, some kid, thanks a lot, have a good night,”
“You too, byeeeee.”

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So that’s how a good day found me watching you tonight, I can’t remember the last time I was this excited about a gig. You came out to rapturous applause, rewarding the audience kindly with Nantes, how does it feel to have a crowd sing your songs along with you? It was as though you were singing old folk songs of a collective homeland from which we’ve all strayed, not something created from a photograph and a few months in Eastern Europe and Paris. And now you’ve moved over to Mariachi influences? I was raised on Cumbia, and I’ve always thought the sound is very similar to that of Eastern Europe, accordions and trumpets and powerful melodies. Everyone around me was in hushed silence for the entirety of the performance, and you seemed so relaxed, demure, a sound like yours doesn’t require anything else – I did like the occasional hand conducting though. On behalf of the audience, not that anyone would make me spokesperson for anything, thank you, it was wonderful incredible; but then you know that, not everyone gets two encores. See you again soon I hope, and erm, if you ever need someone to tap a tambourine or a cowbell, or maybe an old foot pedal harmonium just rescued from cobwebs, then … hi.

Yours,

Lulu Lampshade

SM (small print): emotional content may have been exaggerated slightly for effect.
Will Morgan is an excellent photographer, store clever person and all round nice guy. His photographs are subtle and dream-like; intimate yet austere, information pills all of us here at Amelia’s Magazine are big fans of his beautiful and exciting work. I was lucky enough to catch up with Will to talk about his work and the politics of photography.

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Hi, patient Will, how are you today?

Hello Roisin, I’m very good today thanks , the sun’s out and things are pretty much perfect.

I really love your photographs especially your use of light and attention to details- what makes a good photograph for you?

Thank you, that always nice to hear. Images work for me when they inspire an emotional response or are successful at conveying a mood and atmosphere. It’s the same for me with any art work really, every discipline. When I was at college I was really interested in domestic photography, family albums and the like, I always felt that these images were incredibly powerful because they are loaded with so much meaning, they tie into notions of memory, loss, happiness, sadness and the passage of time. I’m sounding a bit pretentious here but never mind eh? I think that an image can stand on it’s own purely by being beautiful as well, ideally one would combine the beauty with an emotional response. I think photographs are a form of language so it’s nice if they say something.

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Can you tell me about your average working day?

I don’t really have an average working day, I shoot a lot of editorial so the jobs are varied and my personal work is even more so. If I’m on a commissioned job it’s usually an early start, double check the equipment as I have been known to leave vital bits behind. Drink some very strong coffee, try not to smoke (fail) and head to the location, be very nice to everybody and start to shoot. Obviously keep to the deadline, work in close conjunction with the art director and hope the client is happy! All my commissioned work is digital these days so there’s normally an hour at the end of the shoot to go through the images then I retouch and deliver. My personal work is far looser I identify a project I’m interested in and shoot on my own, with minimal equipment. I do get up a lot later on these days, probably smoke more cigarettes though.

Do you have a favourite camera?

I started off using a 1960′s Hassleblad and I still love it, but these days I mainly shoot with a 645 contax and a P30 back, with the advent of digital clients just won’t pay for film and now days they want to see everything immediately, plus you get used to the freedom of digital, you can shoot to your hearts content. I do like my contax but the Hassleblad is probably my favourite although I rarely shoot film these days, I used to have a Polaroid land camera which I throughly enjoyed but I lost it. Lets move on I’m getting a little emotional

What do you make of the whole film vs. digital photography debate? I mean do you view the advent of digital photography as a completely bad thing?

I’m not sure it’s even a debate anymore, digital photography is here and it’s a photographic tool, you just have to learn to use it and I think to deny it is a bit self defeating. I do believe that images shot on film look better than digital raw files but the technology is so good now and if you know a little about digital retouching I can’t really tell the difference. Digital has a huge amount of freedom, film is expensive with digital after the initial investment you shoot for free really, you can really experiment and as I’ve said all my commissions assume I’m shooting digital. I don’t think digital is a bad thing or a good thing really it’s just the way photography has evolved. Different jobs/projects lend themselves to different platforms/cameras and so on, whatever works for you is the best really. Even when I do shoot film I scan it and tweak it in photoshop so it becomes a digital image anyway.

I think that’s really interesting, it’s quite taboo I think to be positive about digital photography, it’s refreshing to hear that you’re pro-digital and proud; whilst film is beautiful, people can always become purist about things like that and I agree that digital technology can add something great to photography- as we can see in your work!

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Continuing with this foray into the ethics or politics of photgraphy, do you agree with the idea that a photograph is the truest form of representation?

I’m probably misinterpreting the question but umm, not really, I think a photograph captures how someone or something looked in that split second the shutter clicked, it’s a tricky one but as a photographer you’re imposing yourself on the scene, you crop in camera, use apertures and f-stops different focal lengths, different formats, you edit your images, decide how to present them, all of this creates a selective reality, I’m not even sure if reality is the right word, also now with the computer technology you can completely alter the original image . All of these things have a huge bearing on whatever you’re photographing and of course you want it to look good. I don’t think it’s a true representation of reality but it has the edge over painting I think.

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Can you tell me about your journey to where you are today (career-wise rather than transport-wise!)? Do you have any advice for aspiring photographers?

Well I went to India for a year when I was 20, I picked up a camera there for the first time and really enjoyed it, I’d stayed in India too long so I missed my University place to study English so i did a part time course in photography. I loved it so went the route of art foundation, photography BA at LCP (also this got me to London). I did well at LCP I won a few prizes and it gave me the confidence to believe I might actually be able to make a living from photography. After my degree I worked part time at the National Film Theatre and assisted various photographers as well as picking up a few commissions for my self. It’s only really been the last three years that I’ve made a reasonable living purely from my own photography but it’s always been fun and I’ve never wanted to stop. I think getting over the fear of the portfolio meetings was crucial! The only advice I would give is to keep at it, never be afraid of showing your work, shoot as much as you can and enjoy it, I think it’s the best job in the world (apart from rock star maybe)

Which photographers inspired you early on in your career?

I was always hugely impressed with Philip Lorca-di Corcia in particular his Hollywood Hustler series, I was and still am a big fan of Eva Vermendel and Martina Hoogland-Ivanow, Paolo Roversi’s work is always beautiful, Christian Boltanski, Stephen Gill, Bruce Davidson, Azim Haidaryan, Nadav Kander, there’s a lot of them but I’ll leave it there.


What projects are you working on at the moment?

I’m working on a few, I’m shooting a series of confessional boxes in Catholic churches, a series on cineastes based around the National Film Theatre and bus stops at night.

I can’t wait to see them!

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All photographs appear courtesy of Will Morgan
At first glance, mind you might have thought that activism, arts and permaculture would make the strangest of bedfellows, but don’t let any preconceived notions cloud your judgement. The imaginative people behind ArtsAdmin are laying on a fortnight of activities which will demonstrate how effortlessly these subjects can work together. Under the name of Two Degrees , and with the recent quote by George Monbiot acting as a kind of frame of reference – ‘We have to stop treating climate change as an urgent issue, we have to start treating it as an international emergency” – the week long series of performances, activities, exhibitions and installations will have one thing in common; our relationship with the environment and the impact of climate change.

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I chatted recently with ArtsAdmin, in their beautiful and unexpectedly peaceful surroundings (well, they are on Commercial Road!) of Toynbee Studios (also the setting of many of the forthcoming events). They explained that even the title of the festival is apposite. ‘Two Degrees’ is in reference to the reports that global temperatures are set to rise by that amount in around 40 years. A relatively ‘small’ rise such as this could lead to catastrophic changes on our planet.

While the message is serious, many performances will be light hearted, and all will be engaging. A case in point, the ‘set list’ reads thus;  
“A reconstructed airplane serves real airline food delivered from City Airport; permaculturists and artists lead a foraging exploration of the City; a crowd of Londoners, an artist and a water dowser trace the course of a great London river; radical temporary transformations of lunchtime London; an artist-activist family confess to past flights they have taken; climate change cabaret; an urban-rural walk to City Farm; a bicycle-powered DJ set (run by good friends of Amelia’s Magazine; Magnificent Revolution) and a filmed rural idyll accompanied by passenger jet noise form Two Degrees”

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Personally, I like the sound of the climate change cabaret. It’s about time that cabaret branched out a little, don’t you think? Speaking of avant-garde performances, a particular highlight of the week will be C.R.A.S.H. A Postcapitalist A-Z, a collaboration between ArtsAdmin and the fantastically named collective that is The Laboratory of Insurrectionary Imagination. While it is difficult to predict exactly what will occur, (it’s best just to come down to the City of London to watch), C.R.A.S.H will be creating a phantasmagorical world where “Eight postcapitalist commissions transform lunchtime in the City including the very last opportunity to purchase a real woman, a soup kitchen distributing bowls of gold soup to City workers, a lone cyclist pedalling a field kitchen around the Square Mile, a forum of bankers, ex-bankers, climate activists, artists and others confessing their capitalist tendencies, and a café of equivalence where a bowl of food costs the same as a banker’s daily salary in parallel with food costs in the developing world.” I believe it is safe to say; brace yourself!

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Elsewhere, the issue of airline travel is of course, a pertinent topic in an event that is engaging in dialogue about climate change. At Toynbee Studios, it will be dealt with in an unexpectedly humorous way. In an activity that Dada would be proud of, the artist Richard DeDomenici (and his cabin crew) will be serving out helpings of airplane food, in its airline style packaging. Just in case you didn’t think that this was authentic enough, your meal will be served as you sit in a recycled airplane interior, which Two Degrees hasten to add, also includes in flight entertainment. For any of you who would pitch up just because you like the taste of airline meals (someone has to…?) there is a deeper meaning behind this. DeDomenici is responding to a recent quote by chef Marcus Wareing about British pub food, which he declares being of poor quality, so much so that for a proper meal, “you would be better off getting on a plane”. Now, I would disagree with chef Wareing on both counts. Has he never eaten at The Eagle? Moreover, it is an irresponsible comment to make, one which highlights the ease in which we get on and off flights, almost as if they were trains. So, rather than getting on a plane, you can experience all the wonders of a flight (but without the guilt of actually flying). Hurrah!

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If you are anything like me; a bit of a hippy with a nerdish fondness for maps and discovering secret, ancient rivers, ( I’ll admit that there are very few of us around!) then you will especially enjoy the outing that Two Degrees have planned. The artist Amy Sharrock will be leading a walk which she describes as her response to global concerns. This will come in the form of an excursion from Islington to the Southbank, tracing the lines of the ancient, and lost Walbrook River. Not obscure enough for you? Did I mention that any participants will be dressed in blue and tied together to resemble water molecules?

All of the events can be booked online at www.artsadmin.co.uk. It promises to be a thought-provoking and engaging week. Knowing ArtsAdmin and the people behind this event, however out of left field the performances may be, the message will be central: we are running out of time in which to save the planet, and the time in which to act is now.

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Crochet, help shells and pipe cleaners…beasts banished forever to the chasmic closet of craft have broken free of the plastic furniture covers and dried flowers to be resurrected as one of the most entertaining young collections to have paraded down the catwalks in some time. Anna Plunkett and Luke Sales, the Australian born and bred design team behind Romance Was Born have glued-gunned themselves firmly in place as the merry pranksters of Sydney.

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No one would blame you for crinkling your nose at the idea of a fashion collection inspired by someone’s nana. But peeking through the kaleidoscopic vision of these wizards of Oz . Driven by textures, shapes and above all colors, Romance Was Born in the fertile imaginations of these two talented designers when they met while studying fashion at the East Sydney Technical College.

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After graduating in 2007 they were invited to attend the Fourth International Support Awards in Italy where they turned down internships with Galliano because “their fashion fairytale had another date with destiny”. These young (water)guns were intent on starting their own label with, and why not, the suitcase size booty of Galliano laces and silks they’d received as a prize from the competition.

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These two confectioners are just as much substance as they are style. Clever tailoring and feminine shapes pepper the opulent couture showpieces. Collaborations with Australian artist Del Kathryn Bartonproduced original digitally printed fabrics and a 12 piece collection entitled ‘Garden of Eden’, which was exhibited at Kaliman Gallery alongside Barton’s work.

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Romance Was Born has also found its way onto the figures of Debbie Harry, Lily Allen, MIA, Cyndi Lauper and Karen O (who opted for a red tulle dress with googly eyes) and rising star rockers Architecture in Helsinki, who wore their puppetry inspired glo-in-the-dark pieces for the filming of their band’s new clip. They must surely have tagged one particular Icelandic songbird for their next mark. we can’t wait to see what they pull out of their party hats next!

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When you first gaze upon the work of Accessory designer Fred Butler it’s all rather indigestible, case flying from one medium to the other with all the energy and flair of an excitable child. She is constantly adding more layers, no rx depth and colour to her pieces, help the result culminates in mind bogglingly colourful and decidedly hap hazard pieces.

With such gusto It’s hard to fathom how to predict her, one instance you could be presented with a outlandish mathematical headpiece rather reminiscent of a futurist rubix cube. Then next your met with a piñata style headdress (lets hope the model isn’t planning on attending any children’s parties, it may conclude in a rather unpleasant knock to the head) Each piece is as brilliant as it is unique, Butler is one of the few designers it’s hard to typecast, her work has been vaguely linked to that of fellow kitsch designers Peter Jensen and Alistair Carr but apart from these she seems a law unto herself.

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Her latest collection featured a hallucinogenic short film entitled “Conspicuous consumption” to which ethereal models clad in swarouski encrusted headpieces serenely sway in a rather hypnotic manner, its all rather like a trip back to Kate Bushes Wuthering Heights video, alas minus the haunting vocals!

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Fred Butler is an infamous character in the fashion sphere; regularly her work adorns the pages of the magazine elite from Elle, I-D, Vogue, Lula, and Hommes Japan to Wonderland. She even graced the pages Amelia’s Magazine to which she featured in issue 10, which is still up for grabs for the record, it’s worth taking a peak!

Her success is universal, making waves not merely within the fashion sphere but within Music also. She boasts eccentric followers from electro folk icon Patrick Wolf to the elegant Bishi. But she doesn’t just appeal to London’s Underground sphere, she has a whole host of high calibre clients from MTV, Selfridges to the V&A!

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Who knows what Fred Butler has hidden under her brightly coloured sleeve, I for one can’t wait to find out!
The Dø are Dan Levy and Olivia B. Merilahti, view who luckily for our ears found each other and started making pop music for fun whilst working on a soundtrack together.
They have already made it big outre-manche, site with their album A Mouthful got to Number 1. Their vibrant sound swings from the playground to the streets and back again, viagra making for an exciting album brimming to the rafters with curiosity, exuberance and passion. It’s strings sweep with cinematic drama over lullabies and hip-hop.
From their genre-switching music to their diverse cultural background; a mix of French (Dan) and Finnish (Olivia), their sound is more unique than any boy-girl duo to have come along for a while.

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Hello Olivia, how are you today?
I’m good thank you- trying to relax …it’s been a while since I’ve had a day off, and we’re getting ready for our crazy UK/Germany tour

Wow, it sounds like your super busy! Are you in Paris right now? I’m jealous, I used to live there and I miss it…
Yes- shall we swap? i’d rather live in London! I dont know why, I’ve always felt very close to England.

It’s a plan! I’ll pack my suitcase as soon as we’re done interviewing! :-)

So it’s probably the first thing most people want to ask about, but how did you guys decide on the name The Dø ? I read it means ‘death’ in Danish…

d+o=Dan+Olivia. Do=do-re-mi-fa-so-la-ti-do! “do(e), a deer, a female deer” (check The Sound of Music). In Denmark it means somthing about death, yeah but, the “ø” was mostly because it looks like the note as written in traditional music theory.

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I like it, The Dø is a big melting pot of languages and cultures; even Austrian with The Sound of Music! I suppose musically as well you mix up the languages with English and Finnish…but not French- was that a concious decision?
Yeah- French was never an option in music for me, my musical language is English, it’s always been, because it is also my musical culture, and pop music has always been in English

Also French in it’s nature for me anyway seems very structured and constrained linguistically- maybe thats hard to put into music?

Like Opera was mostly sung in Italian, German or French…but not in English, really.
It’s just like using the instrument that feels right.

What about singing in Finnish? Listening to your album A Mouthful- it really adds a ethereal touch when it’s used, it such a lovely sounding language!
Hum, I guess the song & the melody of “Unissasi Laulelet” just came up naturally in
Finnish. I didn’t really plan to write a song in Finnish, but I do sometimes need to change and use Finnish in my compositions.

Cool, it’s great to be able to use language like another instrument like you said. Do you think you both approach music with different views on art and music or do you have a lot of similar tastes?
On some stuff we don’t agree, but we’re usually extremely connected. Two people working together is a very intense activity…our musical backgrounds are different, but we’re so complementary…

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Talking about other experiences and influences- what are/were your personal inspirations musically?
I grew up on a lot of songs, in English or Finnish. My mum used to sing me a lot of lullabies in Finnsh, and I guess it is still an inspiration…Then I discovered Nirvana and Hole, then Bjork, Fiona Apple, Ella Fitzgerald, Goran Bregovic, The Wutang and Eminem.
Dan grew up on jazz and discovered classical music in his teens.Dan’s influences are John Coltrane (Dan played the saxophone for many many years), Bela Bartok, Zappa, etc. He was always sure he would become a composer, while I was singing in bands from age 14, but I was very shy about my own songs.

Wow, from 14! So music, even at a young age, was something you definitely wanted to do later in life? And what about for Dan?
Yes, but since I didn’t grow up in a family that was artistic in any way, I didn’t realise until quite late that it could actually become a job! Whereas there was no doubt for Dan.

So what does the future hold for The Dø ?
We’re gonna keep touring until august, in the UK and the rest of Europe, and then we record album 2…we’ve started recording a few songs already and it feels amazing!

I’m really excited to hear that! Thank you! :-)

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A Mouthful is out now.
Welcome to the weird, order wonderful world of Catherine Le Page. This Quebecoise knows how to draw and her illustrations are have a beautiful je-ne-sais-quoi about them. The most interesting pieces create a unique vision of femininity from childhood to womanhood. Brands, case diets, boys, careers and children appear throughout her work, highlighting the concerns of the modern feminine psyche whilst utilising a self-consciously girly whimsical aesthetic. The combination of the two give a deeply intimate view of womanhood.

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As we see below, she seems to condone a sort of universal sisterhood of happiness; the “for better” whilst marriage is perhaps implied as the “for worse”. She both embraces the feminine in her themes of nature, motherhood and celebrations of the female body whilst questioning its social implications.

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The colours and lines used by Le Page are delightfully naive, like the imaginings of a teenage girl; all crushes and crying carved in crayon on pages torn out of squared exercise books, taking us back to the days of secret notes passed in class and writing boys names in pen on our knickers.

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Her work is always mature in it’s treatment of subject matter; like her couple holding hands at the corner of a page faced with giant colourful block arrows, with Le Page‘s native Canada imprinted hauntingly in the background, like the big scary future looming. Or a couple coping with a long distance relationship. Le Page‘s illustrations manage to be both personal whilst universal whilst still maintaining a strong sense of narrative.

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Le Page tightropes the line between a twee femininity and these astute quasi- feminist observations, whilst being neither particularly approving nor politically critical in her work. Yet because she, as a female artist, is asserted as a subject of creativity and expression; it is men who become objects of desire, whilst female concerns take centre stage. Yet does being female and addressing issues of femininity in art always have to be a feminist matter? Opinions welcome…I’m off to burn my bra.

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Categories ,canada, ,crayon, ,featured artist, ,feminism, ,illustration, ,pastel

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Amelia’s Magazine | University of Brighton Graphic Design Graduate Show 2011 Review

Brighton University illustration graduate show 2011-Callum Walker
Installation by Callum Walker.

I am never as interested in Graphic Design at shows, dosage don’t ask me why, viagra order I just generally don’t find it as appealing as pure illustration even though there is often lots of crossover. And of course there was plenty to admire at the Brighton Graphic Design and Illustration Graduate Show. Here’s my round up of the work I liked best…

Elliot Denny graphic design
Elliot Denny graphic design
I was attracted to the installation that Elliott Denny used to display his colourful dreamy graphics.

Bryn Mackenzie birdsinlove
Bryn Mackenzie type
Bryn Mackenzie soundwaves
Bryn Mackenzie played with type and drifting swathes of computer bright colours on a Soundwaves poster.

Brighton University illustration graduate show 2011-James Jack
Brighton University illustration graduate show 2011-James Jack
James Jack overlaid old photos with glittery foiled silhouettes.

Brighton University illustration graduate show 2011-Jenny ShaylerBrighton University illustration graduate show 2011-jenny
Jenny Shayler worked with neon bright ampersands and letterpress text. Follow Jenny Shayler on Twitter.

Brighton University illustration graduate show 2011-Callum Walker
Callum Walker created planets in a petri dish – photographed to mimic the night skies with a macro lens. Oh look, sale there’s me. Normally try to avoid that!

Brighton University illustration graduate show 2011-Callum Walker
Brighton University illustration graduate show 2011-Callum Walker
Callum Walker also celebrated the 132nd birthday of the incandescent lightbulb with a wall of volunteers who were sat in a dark room, then surprised with a bright light as a photograph was taken. The installation sat blinking fitfully as the participants blinked painfully into the lens. Very clever.

Brighton University illustration graduate show 2011-George Sharp
Brighton University illustration graduate show 2011-George SharpGeorge sharp
George Sharp created eye catching typography and graphic designs using screen print techniques.

Brighton University illustration graduate show 2011-Manda Wilks
Manda Wilks had produced some interesting monochrome patterns and papercut typography. Follow Manda Wilks on Twitter.

Brighton University illustration graduate show 2011-Davy Evans Brighton University illustration graduate show 2011-Davy Evans Brighton University illustration graduate show 2011-Davy Evans
Davy Evans worked around ideas of our impending oil crisis, using different techniques to draw attention to the fact that we burn 81 million barrels of crude oil every 24 hours. Eek!

Brighton University illustration graduate show 2011-Louise Richardson
Brighton University illustration graduate show 2011-Louise Richardson
Brighton University illustration graduate show 2011-Louise Richardson
Louise Richardson carefully carved type out of a rainbow selection of coloured pencils for her Live Love Repair project, supporting a move away from our current throwaway culture. She also put together images of skilled workmen in a book. Follow Louise Richardson on Twitter.

Brighton University illustration graduate show 2011-Louise Richardson
Always a good idea to leave a toffee out too, with a little light encouragement to write in the visitor book (I did).

Categories ,2011, ,Brighton Graphic Design and Illustration Graduate Show, ,Bryn Mackenzie, ,Callum Walker, ,Davy Evans, ,Elliott Denny, ,George Sharp, ,Graduate Show, ,Graphic Design, ,James Jack, ,Jenny Shayler, ,Live Love Repair, ,Louise Richardson, ,Manda Wilks, ,review, ,Rochelle School, ,Soundwaves

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Amelia’s Magazine | Valentines Day 2013: Jewellery, Handmade Gifts & Discounts on Chocolates

I’ve given you some great ideas for unique handmade Valentines cards, and now I bring you a round up of beautiful and unusual gifts, including, of course, some delightful jewels.

dowse design anatomy brass pendant
Dowse Design don’t pander to the usual romantic image of Valentines, instead they have crafted an unusual gesture of love that is bound to turn heads: the Anatomy etched pendant comes in steel or brass and is made in England.

With Love Silver Necklace_Nicola Crawford_RRP £135
Jewellery designer Nicola Crawford has based her designs on the lost art of letter writing in a collection entitled With Love. These tumbling letters may well spell out your own feelings.

Georgia Wiseman Sirus Limited Edition pendant
For something more jewel encrusted, Georgia Wiseman has some glamourous earrings. I love the art deco influenced Capella design, but she has also created a special limited edition pendant for Valentines; Sirus, which looks like a modern day flint, is made with a smokey Swarovski crystal set in rose gold. She’s offering free P&P up until February 14th too.

EOTW designs Hand made Solid SIlver Earrings
We profiled Eye of The World Designs back in 2011, and since then designer Hope Von Joel has been busy building the brand, which bridges interior design and jewellery. I love these bold laminated wood and perspex earrings.

Made & Told heart ikat cushion
Moving on to other gift ideas, Made & Told are offering hand woven Ikat cushion covers with a heart pattern. They are handmade in Uzbekistan and come gift wrapped for £30 (including P&P) using the code SAINTVALENTINE. The company promotes traditional crafts from central Asia and you can watch a film about the making of the cushion on their website.

Nichollette Yardley-Moore vintage silk scarf Rose cushion
Designer Nichollette Yardley-Moore collects vintage fabrics, scarves and original flags which she then transforms into beautiful one-of-a-kind cushions. I like her romantic floral cushions, which are made up with vintage silk scarves from the 1960s

MrPS happy hearts Hankies
These pretty hankies by illustrator Robert Shadbolt are covered in smiling hearts. They are screen-printed by hand in the Mr.PS studio and come in double-packs of candy pink & sky blue, and plum & turquoise.

Chloe Cook painted teapot
If you find an overload of hearts a bit saccharine, how about this starry hand painted teapot by Chloe Cook?

M.Hulot Strapped howe red bag
Or how about a beautiful rich red hand made leather Howe clutch from M.Hulot?

London Kills Me Reclaimed slate Heart
Slate hearts from London Kills Me are hand cut from reclaimed roof slate, much of it from the nineteenth century, meaning that each one has a slightly different patina. They can be written on in chalk pen: making them an ideal alternative to a paper card.

sabina savage hummingbird scarf
This wool and silk mix scarf by Sabina Sauvage features four bold hummingbirds and comes with a lovely blood red border.

Charlotte Linton Cove_paisley scarf
There’s something a bit, I don’t know, meaty, about this unusual bright red Cove Paisley scarf by designer Charlotte Linton. It would make an unusual gift, the swirls reminiscent of hearts and body parts.

David Shillinglaw Double Heart painted bottle
Artist David Shillinglaw offers beautiful hand painted bottles, which come with a short personal message: perfect for a beer lover perhaps?

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And: for something a bit different, how about a personalised serenade over the phone from consummate karaoke professionals Hot Breath (above). ‘Intimate, passionate and 100% from the heart. All sung by a professional amateur to the best of their ability.’

To find exclusive handmade designs, go no further than the Love.Make Designs pop up shop at Craft Central’s Corner Shop in Farringdon, London from the 11-17th of February.

Luxury-Valentine-Gifts-My Voucher Codes Chocolates Hotel Chocolat
And don’t forget, chocolates will always go down a treat, so why not take advantage of some great discounts at My Voucher Codes? Get 10% off any purchase from Hotel Chocolat: how about their Sealed With a Kiss selection, which comes in a pretty heart shaped box?

Thorntons Be My Valentine chocolate selection my voucher codes
Or you could really make an impression with this Be My Valentine chocolates selection from Thorntons, with a bespoke message hand iced onto a chocolate tag. Take advantage of My Voucher Codes and get a free box of chocolates when you spend £20 with Thorntons, plus free delivery on orders of £25 or more.

To round off the blog, here’s a clever infographic describing spending patterns on Valentines Day, brought to you by the folks at My Voucher Codes.

Valentines Day spending patterns infographic
Fancy being featured in one of my regular round ups? Make sure you follow me on twitter @ameliagregory: most of these designers responded to open callouts for Valentines ideas.

Categories ,2013, ,anatomy, ,Be My Valentine, ,bespoke, ,Capella, ,Charlotte Linton, ,Chloe Cook, ,chocolate, ,Cove Paisley, ,Craft Central, ,cushions, ,David Shillinglaw, ,discounts, ,Dowse Design, ,Eye of The World Designs, ,Georgia Wiseman, ,gifts, ,handmade, ,Hope Von Joel, ,Hot Breath, ,Hotel Chocolat, ,Howe clutch, ,Infographic, ,jewellery, ,Karaoke, ,London Kills Me, ,Love.Make Designs, ,M.Hulot, ,Made & Told, ,Mr PS, ,My Voucher Codes, ,Nichollette Yardley-Moore, ,Nicola Crawford, ,Robert Shadbolt, ,Sabina Sauvage, ,Sealed With a Kiss, ,Sirus, ,Swarovski, ,The Corner Shop, ,Thorntons, ,Uzbekistan, ,Valentine’s Day, ,Valentines, ,Vouchers, ,With Love

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