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Top 25 Art Blog - Creative Tourist

DAT Politics : An Interview

Before their “step” over to play Mofofest DAT Politics talk to Amelia’s

Written by Rebecca Milne

Yellow and White mac 008Image courtesy of Christopher Raeburn

Christopher Raeburn
A designer whose name is never far from any eco fashion list is that of Christopher Raeburn, viagra sale who is famed for his high end, more about innovative and functional fashion created using re-appropriated military fabrics. Sourcing his material from de-commissioned military stock and hot-air balloon canvas among other materials Raeburn both redesigns and manufactures his groundbreaking garments ethically within the UK.

PB121954Image courtesy of Rachael Oku

Of his SS10 collection Christopher says: “This season presents a great opportunity to play with colour, page negative space and flowing lines; from its inception I wanted to create an upbeat, fresh and experimental collection.”
With the emphasis on rouching, contrasting geometric panels and colourful taped seams Raeburn utilises laser cutting techniques for the first time introducing repeat patterns of concentric circle cut-outs which are peppered throughout the collection cleverly hidden between panels and layered hoods and sleeves.

Parachute dress

Image courtesy of Christopher Raeburn

What is most striking about Raeburn’s new contemporary collection of dresses, ponchos, skirts and macs is how well his colour palette and themes work together with layer, light and silhouette being the main focuses. With the majority of fabric used being transparent it is Raeburn’s bright accents of colour and playful dots that really inject life into the garments, and are reminiscent of jellyfish.

Purple and White Jacket with matching bag 006

Image courtesy of Christopher Raeburn

Rather excitingly the new collection also features accessories for the first time, with Raeburn fusing woven netting with his trademark parachute fabric and cord to great effect adding to the high impact of this super functional range.

Lu Flux

PB121959Image courtesy of Rachael Oku

Another exciting designer who we’re predicting big things for next year is the lovely Lu Flux; who has just launched her debut collection after being named ‘London’s newest one to watch’ at Vauxhall Fashion Scout earlier in the year. What sets Lu’s designs apart is that her work is created using salvaged, vintage and organic fabrics, which she cleverly combines with traditional techniques such as knitting, pleating and patchwork.

PB121960Image courtesy of Rachael Oku

Lu’s witty and playful SS10 collection titled ‘The Eco Life of Riley’ is inspired by the ‘humble bluetit’ which is cleverly juxtaposed with bold jarring graphics throughout the collection. If developing her own eco brand wasn’t enough of a challenge Lu is also busy working on a project called Soko Kenya, which was conceived over two years ago when she visited the small coastal town of Ukunda in Kenya. The idea behind this project is to work in conjunction with local Kenyan tailors who attend the community owned Ukunda Youth Polytechnic, which offers basic vocational training to local residents at a low cost.

PB121962Image courtesy of Rachael Oku

This collaboration will see Soko invest a minimum of 5% gross earnings into the Polytechnic annually in addition to year-round fundraising to help acquire sewing machines and other essential equipment for the students. Additionally Soko are committed to providing support in the design and running of the Polytechnic’s existing tailoring department and syllabus according to international fair-trade and eco production standards.

PB121961Image courtesy of Rachael Oku depicting Soko Kenya products

Most importantly both parties are committed to working together to transform the Polytechnic into an eco institution by introducing a rainwater catchment system and working to create solar generated electricity. To find out more about this great project and where to buy Soko Kenya products head to their website.

Apron Dress and BodysuitImage courtesy of Julia Smith

Julia Smith
Another groundbreaking designer who caught our attention was Julia Smith, a designer who has graced the webpages of Amelia’s magazine a few times previously. Julia’s SS10 collection entitled ‘Nurture Me’ explores the idea of mixing beauty with function. Part inspired by the 1930′s and 1940′s, when loose shapes and function were paramount Julia’s collection also references the concept of underwear as outerwear. Created using tactile fabrics such as soy, bamboo and organic cotton and linen Julia cleverly juxtaposes these with recycled polyester which is made from recycled plastic (PET) bottles.

Lara Jacket and Power BodyImage courtesy of Julia Smith

What really sets Julia apart is her second line aptly titled ‘Julia Smith Made in Africa’, which supports lives in Ghana through the vision of Mrs. Marian Essel, a highly skilled batik printer from Ghana, West Africa. Having worked for the Global Mamas in Cape Coast, Marian and Julia Smith have now formed a co-operative in the suburbs of Accra, Ghana’s capital city, offering employment opportunities to the struggling community.

Made in Africa 1Image courtesy of Julia Smith depicting the Made in Africa collection

With Marian using all the proceeds of her work to employ disadvantaged adults as well as sponsoring children so that they can go to school, this is a fantastic initiative which aims to help everyone within the community get the best educational start in life. The ‘Julia Smith Made in Africa’ collection is stocked in Julia’s new flagship store in Marble Arch’s Connaught Village.

Matt and Nat
A new brand to Amelia’s magazine which is fast becoming a firm favourite is that of Matt & Nat, a pioneering vegan luxury accessories label who create animal free products for both men and women. Interestingly (which I’m hoping you’ll agree) Matt & Nat is not a design duo as the name would suggest but is instead founded by Inder Bedi who was challenged almost 20 years ago to forgo animal products for 30 days. Ever since he has made a conscious effort to use recycled and greener materials in his work steering clear of leather, wool and animal by-products.

For SS10 Matt & Nat are continuing where they left off last season with their 21 water bottles campaign which sees all the linings in their handbags and wallets created using 100% recycled plastic, with each accessory using an average of 21 bottles.

With the inspirations for their SS10 collection being biker chic and glam rock, each bag has been embellished differently with everything from studs to zip details. Made primarily from eel skin (incidentally the softest type of leather I have ever felt,) the colour palette of fiery scarlet, intense blue and blush pink bring a vintage feel to the pieces.

Henrietta Ludgate
A great designer who has already received quite a bit of media attention in 2009 is Henrietta Ludgate, who won the Ethical Fashion Forum ‘Fashion Innovation Award’ earlier in the year. Creating sustainable and sculptural garments from her studio in the remote Highlands of Scotland, Henrietta stays close to her Scotch roots by working primarily with Scottish linen.

With a brand ethos to support both the Scottish and British textile industry as a whole, all fabrics are sourced from within the British Isles with all pieces produced locally.

A champion of slow fashion, Henrietta’s minimalist silhouette remains hauntingly elegant and distinctive. For inspiration Henrietta often looks to Elsa Schiaparelli, and her vision of fashion as a type of architecture, and beliefs that clothing should be ‘closely connected to the frame of the body’.

With the recent opening of a swanky new showroom in London’s Covent Garden, things are looking bright for 2010.
Stay tuned for the second instalment tomorrow…
Yellow and White mac 008Image courtesy of Christopher Raeburn

Christopher Raeburn
A designer whose name is never far from any eco fashion list is that of Christopher Raeburn, cure who is famed for his high end, innovative and functional fashion created using re-appropriated military fabrics. Sourcing his material from de-commissioned military stock and hot-air balloon canvas among other materials Raeburn both redesigns and manufactures his groundbreaking garments ethically within the UK.

PB121954Image courtesy of Rachael Oku

Of his SS10 collection Christopher says: “This season presents a great opportunity to play with colour, negative space and flowing lines; from its inception I wanted to create an upbeat, fresh and experimental collection.”
With the emphasis on rouching, contrasting geometric panels and colourful taped seams Raeburn utilises laser cutting techniques for the first time introducing repeat patterns of concentric circle cut-outs which are peppered throughout the collection cleverly hidden between panels and layered hoods and sleeves.

Parachute dress

Image courtesy of Christopher Raeburn

What is most striking about Raeburn’s new contemporary collection of dresses, ponchos, skirts and macs is how well his colour palette and themes work together with layer, light and silhouette being the main focuses. With the majority of fabric used being transparent it is Raeburn’s bright accents of colour and playful dots that really inject life into the garments, and are reminiscent of jellyfish.

Purple and White Jacket with matching bag 006

Image courtesy of Christopher Raeburn

Rather excitingly the new collection also features accessories for the first time, with Raeburn fusing woven netting with his trademark parachute fabric and cord to great effect adding to the high impact of this super functional range.

Lu FluxPB121959Image courtesy of Rachael Oku

Another exciting designer who we’re predicting big things for next year is the lovely Lu Flux; who has just launched her debut collection after being named ‘London’s newest one to watch’ at Vauxhall Fashion Scout earlier in the year. What sets Lu’s designs apart is that her work is created using salvaged, vintage and organic fabrics, which she cleverly combines with traditional techniques such as knitting, pleating and patchwork.

PB121960Image courtesy of Rachael Oku

Lu’s witty and playful SS10 collection titled ‘The Eco Life of Riley’ is inspired by the ‘humble bluetit’ which is cleverly juxtaposed with bold jarring graphics throughout the collection. If developing her own eco brand wasn’t enough of a challenge Lu is also busy working on a project called Soko Kenya, which was conceived over two years ago when she visited the small coastal town of Ukunda in Kenya. The idea behind this project is to work in conjunction with local Kenyan tailors who attend the community owned Ukunda Youth Polytechnic, which offers basic vocational training to local residents at a low cost.

PB121962Image courtesy of Rachael Oku

This collaboration will see Soko invest a minimum of 5% gross earnings into the Polytechnic annually in addition to year-round fundraising to help acquire sewing machines and other essential equipment for the students. Additionally Soko are committed to providing support in the design and running of the Polytechnic’s existing tailoring department and syllabus according to international fair-trade and eco production standards.

PB121961Image courtesy of Rachael Oku depicting Soko Kenya products

Most importantly both parties are committed to working together to transform the Polytechnic into an eco institution by introducing a rainwater catchment system and working to create solar generated electricity. To find out more about this great project and where to buy Soko Kenya products head to their website.

Apron Dress and BodysuitImage courtesy of Julia Smith

Julia Smith
Another groundbreaking designer who caught our attention was Julia Smith, a designer who has graced the webpages of Amelia’s magazine a few times previously. Julia’s SS10 collection entitled ‘Nurture Me’ explores the idea of mixing beauty with function. Part inspired by the 1930′s and 1940′s, when loose shapes and function were paramount Julia’s collection also references the concept of underwear as outerwear. Created using tactile fabrics such as soy, bamboo and organic cotton and linen Julia cleverly juxtaposes these with recycled polyester which is made from recycled plastic (PET) bottles.

Lara Jacket and Power BodyImage courtesy of Julia Smith

What really sets Julia apart is her second line aptly titled ‘Julia Smith Made in Africa’, which supports lives in Ghana through the vision of Mrs. Marian Essel, a highly skilled batik printer from Ghana, West Africa. Having worked for the Global Mamas in Cape Coast, Marian and Julia Smith have now formed a co-operative in the suburbs of Accra, Ghana’s capital city, offering employment opportunities to the struggling community.

Made in Africa 1Image courtesy of Julia Smith depicting the Made in Africa collection

With Marian using all the proceeds of her work to employ disadvantaged adults as well as sponsoring children so that they can go to school, this is a fantastic initiative which aims to help everyone within the community get the best educational start in life. The ‘Julia Smith Made in Africa’ collection is stocked in Julia’s new flagship store in Marble Arch’s Connaught Village.

borrato

Matt and Nat
Image courtesy of Matt and Nat

A new brand to Amelia’s magazine which is fast becoming a firm favourite is that of Matt & Nat, a pioneering vegan luxury accessories label who create animal free products for both men and women. Interestingly (which I’m hoping you’ll agree) Matt & Nat is not a design duo as the name would suggest but is instead founded by Inder Bedi who was challenged almost 20 years ago to forgo animal products for 30 days. Ever since he has made a conscious effort to use recycled and greener materials in his work steering clear of leather, wool and animal by-products.

commix

Image courtesy of Matt and Nat

For SS10 Matt & Nat are continuing where they left off last season with their 21 water bottles campaign which sees all the linings in their handbags and wallets created using 100% recycled plastic, with each accessory using an average of 21 bottles.

hendrix blueImage courtesy of Matt and Nat

With the inspirations for their SS10 collection being biker chic and glam rock, each bag has been embellished differently with everything from studs to zip details. Made primarily from eel skin (incidentally the softest type of leather I have ever felt,) the colour palette of fiery scarlet, intense blue and blush pink bring a vintage feel to the pieces.

Henrietta Ludgate
A great designer who has already received quite a bit of media attention in 2009 is Henrietta Ludgate, who won the Ethical Fashion Forum ‘Fashion Innovation Award’ earlier in the year. Creating sustainable and sculptural garments from her studio in the remote Highlands of Scotland, Henrietta stays close to her Scotch roots by working primarily with Scottish linen.

4Image courtesy of Henrietta Ludgate

With a brand ethos to support both the Scottish and British textile industry as a whole, all fabrics are sourced from within the British Isles with all pieces produced locally.

image15

A champion of slow fashion, Henrietta’s minimalist silhouette remains hauntingly elegant and distinctive. For inspiration Henrietta often looks to Elsa Schiaparelli, and her vision of fashion as a type of architecture, and beliefs that clothing should be ‘closely connected to the frame of the body’.

image12Image courtesy of Henrietta Ludgate

With the recent opening of a swanky new showroom in London’s Covent Garden, things are looking bright for 2010.
Stay tuned for the second instalment tomorrow…
DAT

French electro ensemble DAT Politics are coming to little old London town to headline the fourth installment of Mofofest this month. Taking place December 12th, treat My Tiger Timing and Bright Light Bright Light are also part of the jam packed line up. Ahead of this rare UK performance from the group, cheapest Politicians Claude and Gaëtan talked to Amelia’s about how their material comes together, this web Mofofest and the perfect DAT Politics party.

France seems to produce the crème de la crème of electro acts, why is this? Is there something in the water?
G: There is definitely a strong connection between electronic music and pop culture in France. It seems to be a historic thing, for at least fifty years the French electronic artists have produced dance music influenced by sound research and pop. Now, it’s a kind of collective spirit, the number of electro acts is massive but the best ones have a specific sound.

DAT Politics have been established for 10 years now, what have been the highlights of your decade in the industry?
G: Maybe our “Plugs Plus” album because it was a decisive step in our career. We switched from instrumental music to electro pop songs with lyrics, verses and a chorus. This choice gave us a lot of freedom and possibilities; it was like opening a new toolbox and breaking the walls in the house. Something very fresh, and the best part is that we’re still working on it!

What new acts excite you?
G: Not that new, but some tracks from Diplo with Rye Rye or Major Lazer are pretty amazing in the fucked up dance music register.

What older acts still have your attention?
C: Daft Punk, Peaches, Sonic youth, Kraftwerk

I’m really interested as to how your songs come together? They seem like they are made in the dark of night? I can’t imagine you work together during the day?
G: Actually, more like late afternoon with the curtains drawn and a pink neon light on.
C: When we decide to work on a new album we meet everyday for several weeks. We build up some tracks together. One comes with an idea for the beats for instance, one the synth lines, one the samples or the vocals. Gaëtan and I write the lyrics. Then we are just the 3 of us in front of the computer trying to assemble each piece. At some point each of us keeps the demo version of the tracks to listen to them and we meet again with new ideas and new material to finish. The process will be the same till we agreed on the final version of the track.

DAT1

What is the most unusual thing that has been used on a track?
G: One time, we used a coffee grinder for a NWA remix, also a talking bird which made some strange sounds. We can use any kind of unusual sources to set a specific atmosphere. It’s like the cherry on the cake but the main part of the track is done with classic electronics like synths and beats.

You obviously use computers a lot, Are you a PC or a Mac?
C: At the beginning, the project was based on laptops’ jamming so several laptops have been through our hands. We’ve been using both. They have the same abilities nowadays. But we’re mainly using Mac which are more stable.

When most people are on computers they get distracted by Facebook, does this happen to you?!
C: Of course, those social networks are easy to get addicted to, but we try to adjust and also concentrate on our activities.

The Artwork/Graphics/Visual side of things are important to you? Where does this come from?
C: We’ve been studying in art school, we are movie freaks, and read a lot of comics as well. Everything is potentially an influence. Our artistic universe is sonic and visual at the same time. It’s hard to imagine one without the other. Since the beginning, we design our own covers, it’s like we know better what fits to our sound, a kind of D.I.Y tradition: have fun with some parallel media like photography, drawings, videos…

DAT3

So you come to London for Mofofest…
C: It ‘s always good to play in London! And we know the girls from Mofofest, their parties are always great !! People always look so trendy! I like that a lot! The London crowd is often very sexy!!

Anything particularly special planned?
C: We’re excited to play “Mad Kit” for the first time in London, we played it many times everywhere else, It went very well, so we expect a lot of positive energy!

Are you excited for the rest of the line up?
C:Yes! always good to discover new bands/acts.

People should defiantly wear their dancing shoes when they come to see you, yes?
C: Of course ! Ballet shoes, sneakers, high heels, moonboots any outfits/shoes they are comfortable in !!

DAT2

How do you prepare for live shows?
C: We have a studio where we rehearse all together till we find the good compromise between the tracks on the album and how we should perform them live.
G: It’s important to set the gear in a space with a real PA and play loud to see how the things are gonna work for the audience during the show.

Where on earth do you find energy for this type of performance?!
C: We are working out a bit. But I guess that the audience is very important too. It really pulls you up! That’s a bit cliché but it’s so nice to see people react to your music!

I can imagine it is not easy to unwind after a live show?
C: That’s a weird feeling because before the show it’s hard to relax, and it’s difficult to appreciate what’s going on… Then we go on and when the show is over and went well, we are usually really high, and ready to party!!

Now for some quick fire party themed questions to find out what a DAT Politics party would be like…
Party song?
C: “Rectangle” from Jacno

Party food?
C: Ceviche

Party city?

C: Berlin / Paris/ Buenos Aires/ London/ Tokyo….

Party game?

C: Hide and Seek

Party drink?

C: Champagne

Party trick?
G: Oddibil (anti-hangover)

Party hat?
C: No hat

Party partner?

C: A good looking and funny young man

Party pants?
C: Shinny tights and high heels boots

Party like a celebrity?

G: I wanna party like Peter Sellers.

You can party with DAT Politics this Saturday at Bardens Boudoir, 38 Stoke Newington Road, Dalston, 8pm – 4am. Click here for more details

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