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Top 25 Art Blog - Creative Tourist

Hop Farm Festival

There's nowt more glorious than attending a festival on a hot summers day with a cider in hand, especially when you are being serenaded by the gentle folk of Laura Marling and Johnny Flynn.

Written by Sophie Hill

Tarradiddle-exhibition
Lauren-Mortimer-Kids-With-Guns
Kids With Guns by Lauren Mortimer.

Last week saw the opening of Tarradiddle, doctor an exhibition showcasing the combined talents of nine artists of the recently founded all-female collective ‘Martha’, approved each exploring an experimental mode of story-telling through their work. The private view took place on 7th June 2010 opposite the Hackney City Farm in London’s East End, viagra and saw the pop-up gallery space full to bursting with people over two floors who came for an eclectic mix of art (and the amazing hand made biscuits!). There was a real collective feel to the show as the works themselves sat in harmony alongside one another, a variety of mediums from paintings, illustration, through video and sculpture.

Sorcha-O'brien-open-closed
Open Closed by Sorcha O’brien.

I got a real sense of a dark, almost menacing undercurrent throughout this exhibition with a subtext to each piece that I’m keen to discover. What I found infectious was the way this tone is transformed into an uplifting experience right through the artwork on show.

Lauren-Mortimer-Swing-Cannon
Swing Cannon by Lauren Mortimer.

Upstairs had work ranging from the beautifully playful, yet disturbing illustrations of Lauren Mortimer depicting children in typical childhood scenarios with a sinister twist, her subject’s childhood naivety contrasting brilliantly with the haunting, ethereal subjects of Linda Hemmersbach’s paintings. Zosienka Gibb’s work continued in a similar character driven vain with a series of portraits depicting characters from ‘The Master and the Margarita’, the novel by Mikhail Bulgakov, her images smattered with traces of symbolism and influenced by an African, British and Eastern European childhood.

Linda-Hemmersbach
Art by Linda Hemmersbach.
Zosia-Gibbs
Work from Zosia Gibbs.

I found Marina Rees’ work captivating, adding variety and depth to the show through a combination of sculpture and images made using a host of unusual natural materials, that examine the human relationship with animals.

Marina-Rees-polar-mask
Polar Mask by Marina Rees.

The lower level was dedicated entirely to moving image, and was split between the work of Jade Mortimer and Sarah Blaszczok. Jade’s work dominated the centre of the room with set pieces accompanying a sumptuously shot film depicting two character’s mysteriously ominous encounter, based around some unique pistol shaped decanters marketed in the 1960’s by Avon. Sarah’s film was similarly intriguing with it’s wordless narrative showing events unfold as the characters carry out mundane and repeated acts, the result was in equal parts both sinister and ridiculous.

Jade-Mortimer-New-World
Jade-Mortimer-New-World-still
New World by Jade Mortimer.

The show’s biggest appeal lay in the sense of an unspoken story being told throughout the exhibition, and an incentive to pay close attention to all the work that was on show. My own desire to explore what I saw here stemmed not only from a visceral reaction to the art itself, but to make my own sense of the ambiguity within each piece. It was an exhibition cohesive in themes and ideas, and was undoubtedly a rewarding overall show. The word Tarradiddle means a concocted story or fib, and it’s definitely one I whole heartedly recommend trying to debunk.

Lauren-Mortimer-Kids-With-Guns
Kids With Guns by Lauren Mortimer.

Last week saw the opening of Tarradiddle, site an exhibition showcasing the combined talents of nine artists of the recently founded all-female collective ‘Martha’, recipe each exploring an experimental mode of story-telling through their work. The private view took place on 7th June 2010 opposite the Hackney City Farm in London’s East End, information pills and saw the pop-up gallery space full to bursting with people over two floors who came for an eclectic mix of art (and the amazing hand made biscuits!). There was a real collective feel to the show as the works themselves sat in harmony alongside one another, a variety of mediums from paintings, illustration, through video and sculpture.

Sorcha-O'brien-open-closed
Open Closed by Sorcha O’brien.

I got a real sense of a dark, almost menacing undercurrent throughout this exhibition with a subtext to each piece that I’m keen to discover. What I found infectious was the way this tone is transformed into an uplifting experience right through the artwork on show.

Lauren-Mortimer-Swing-Cannon
Swing Cannon by Lauren Mortimer.

Upstairs had work ranging from the beautifully playful, yet disturbing illustrations of Lauren Mortimer depicting children in typical childhood scenarios with a sinister twist, her subject’s childhood naivety contrasting brilliantly with the haunting, ethereal subjects of Linda Hemmersbach’s paintings. Zosienka Gibb’s work continued in a similar character driven vain with a series of portraits depicting characters from ‘The Master and the Margarita’, the novel by Mikhail Bulgakov, her images smattered with traces of symbolism and influenced by an African, British and Eastern European childhood.

Linda-Hemmersbach
Art by Linda Hemmersbach.
Zosia-Gibbs
Work from Zosia Gibbs.

I found Marina Rees’ work captivating, adding variety and depth to the show through a combination of sculpture and images made using a host of unusual natural materials, that examine the human relationship with animals.

Marina-Rees-polar-mask
Polar Mask by Marina Rees.

The lower level was dedicated entirely to moving image, and was split between the work of Jade Mortimer and Sarah Blaszczok. Jade’s work dominated the centre of the room with set pieces accompanying a sumptuously shot film depicting two character’s mysteriously ominous encounter, based around some unique pistol shaped decanters marketed in the 1960’s by Avon. Sarah’s film was similarly intriguing with it’s wordless narrative showing events unfold as the characters carry out mundane and repeated acts, the result was in equal parts both sinister and ridiculous.

Jade-Mortimer-New-World
Jade-Mortimer-New-World-still
New World by Jade Mortimer.

The show’s biggest appeal lay in the sense of an unspoken story being told throughout the exhibition, and an incentive to pay close attention to all the work that was on show. My own desire to explore what I saw here stemmed not only from a visceral reaction to the art itself, but to make my own sense of the ambiguity within each piece. It was an exhibition cohesive in themes and ideas, and was undoubtedly a rewarding overall show. The word Tarradiddle means a concocted story or fib, and it’s definitely one I whole heartedly recommend trying to debunk.

Tarradiddle-exhibition

Lauren-Mortimer-Kids-With-Guns
Kids With Guns by Lauren Mortimer.

Last week saw the opening of Tarradiddle, pilule an exhibition showcasing the combined talents of nine artists of the recently founded all-female collective ‘Martha’, viagra buy each exploring an experimental mode of story-telling through their work. The private view took place on 7th June 2010 opposite the Hackney City Farm in London’s East End, and saw the pop-up gallery space full to bursting with people over two floors who came for an eclectic mix of art (and the amazing hand made biscuits!). There was a real collective feel to the show as the works themselves sat in harmony alongside one another, a variety of mediums from paintings, illustration, through video and sculpture.

Sorcha-O'brien-open-closed
Open Closed by Sorcha O’brien.

I got a real sense of a dark, almost menacing undercurrent throughout this exhibition with a subtext to each piece that I’m keen to discover. What I found infectious was the way this tone is transformed into an uplifting experience right through the artwork on show.

Lauren-Mortimer-Swing-Cannon
Swing Cannon by Lauren Mortimer.

Upstairs had work ranging from the beautifully playful, yet disturbing illustrations of Lauren Mortimer depicting children in typical childhood scenarios with a sinister twist, her subject’s childhood naivety contrasting brilliantly with the haunting, ethereal subjects of Linda Hemmersbach’s paintings. Zosienka Gibb’s work continued in a similar character driven vain with a series of portraits depicting characters from ‘The Master and the Margarita’, the novel by Mikhail Bulgakov, her images smattered with traces of symbolism and influenced by an African, British and Eastern European childhood.

Linda-Hemmersbach
Art by Linda Hemmersbach.
Zosia-Gibbs
Work from Zosia Gibbs.

I found Marina Rees’ work captivating, adding variety and depth to the show through a combination of sculpture and images made using a host of unusual natural materials, that examine the human relationship with animals.

Marina-Rees-polar-mask
Polar Mask by Marina Rees.

The lower level was dedicated entirely to moving image, and was split between the work of Jade Mortimer and Sarah Blaszczok. Jade’s work dominated the centre of the room with set pieces accompanying a sumptuously shot film depicting two character’s mysteriously ominous encounter, based around some unique pistol shaped decanters marketed in the 1960’s by Avon. Sarah’s film was similarly intriguing with it’s wordless narrative showing events unfold as the characters carry out mundane and repeated acts, the result was in equal parts both sinister and ridiculous.

Jade-Mortimer-New-World
Jade-Mortimer-New-World-still
New World by Jade Mortimer.

The show’s biggest appeal lay in the sense of an unspoken story being told throughout the exhibition, and an incentive to pay close attention to all the work that was on show. My own desire to explore what I saw here stemmed not only from a visceral reaction to the art itself, but to make my own sense of the ambiguity within each piece. It was an exhibition cohesive in themes and ideas, and was undoubtedly a rewarding overall show. The word Tarradiddle means a concocted story or fib, and it’s definitely one I whole heartedly recommend trying to debunk.

Tarradiddle-exhibition

Feelin’ hot hot hot… we arrived at the field with a blanket and straw hat, pharm and headed straight to the bar. Queuing for what felt like a life-time in the blistering heat, sounds of Johnny Flynn drifted through the air along with the smells of barbecued sausages. Queuing aside, we were happy.

Ciders in hand we weaved through camping chairs and stepped apologetically over blankets, occasionally catching the odd sandaled foot or splashing a little cider over a resting head… all part of the joy of festivalling, we found a spot, lay the blanket on the ground just in time for Laura Marling to take to the stage. ‘Afternoon everyone!’ Laura’s soothing voice echoed over the masses, ‘what a day!’…. people woo’d and clapped and cheered. In two years, Marling’s voice and lyrics have matured from pretty ditties to soulful folk… and her performance this weekend reeled in an eclectic crowd. Folk of all ages stood, eyes fixed and humming and Marling’s voice resonated. Songs from Marling’s latest album I Speak Because I Can mixed with original tracks from My Manic and I had us reminiscing, spinning around and singing-along.

Between sets we ate, drank and lay gazing into the brilliant blue ether… catching a bit of celebrity football, Mumford & Sons giving it their best. Seasick Steve was next up, and took to the stage with crowds-a-roaring. Unfortunately, due to minor sunstroke, we weren’t around for the whole set, but from what we saw, as always Seasick gave a cracking performance.

Mumford & Sons belted out there emotive country-inspired folk, now well-known from their vast radio coverage, and had the audience fixed. Looking and sounding the part, and slotting in perfectly to the Hop Farm scene.

Whilst queuing for a lamb kofta and chatting to a wonderful lady who lives on a pig farm in Cambridgeshire, who told me stories of her days as a festival queen in the 70s… (she was so small she used to crouch on the loo seat, feet on the seat – to avoid sitting on it… little ladies – take note!) Ray Davies performed and it came as pleasant surprise to hear the well-known Kinks records: Lola, You Really Got Me and all the rest. At the age of 66, Ray’s voice carried across fields, still very much in tact.

Last but not least, good old Bob Dylan appeared on stage, his (very) husky tones hooking the expectant field of fans, and taking them on a tumultuous journey through a plethora of songs steeped in sentiment.

Finally, an incredible set from Devendra Banhart ensued; no longer the long-haired folky-dolky guy that once plucked at our heartstrings, Devendra has completely reinvented his style: short-back-and-sides, checked shirt and long yellow cardie buttoned up; the sounds were funky and playful, his voice endearing and still with that jagged edge that made him famous. Even a few Roxy Music covers were thrown in to get us grooving. We danced until the cows came home.

All in all, a grand day out. Thank you Hop Farm!

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