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Top 25 Art Blog - Creative Tourist

Lissie’s Star Is On The Ascendant.

It's a busy life for this humble Midwestern singer. Currently on an ever expanding tour to promote her new album "Catching A Tiger", an enchanting snapshot of blues, Americana and folk, Lissie is having a memorable year; and it's not over yet!

Written by Cari Steel

Water Kerry Lemon thumb
Water Natasha-Thompson-Water-Umbrella-Editorial

It’s been sticky, viagra sale hasn’t it? The sunshine is all well and good whilst you are within spitting distance of a garden or beer garden (or a patch of pavement if you frequent the majority of London pubs), drug but battling with public transport, malady with people so far in your space that they may as well be inside you is no party. Some trains still seem to have the heating on and we are incessantly reminded to consider carrying a bottle of water with us which, curiously, makes me want to punch the drivers face in. Moving in any way other than a slow glide is ghastly in the heat. As one friend put it yesterday, ‘its like moving through hummus’.

Water Fritha Strickland

Where is this tirade taking us, you wonder? It is taking us to water. Or rather the lack of it. We have all seen the adverts that contain images of people in faraway countries using buckets to scoop putrid, fly-ridden water into canisters to use as drinking and cooking water. But the reality is that these images have become so pervasive in our consciousness that they simply cease to shock us. What’s that got to do with us? Whilst we are nowhere near the poverty of many countries with minimal access to safe drinking water, as the population rises and industrialisation increases, water will become more and more precious in all parts of the world.

WaterNatasha-Thompson-Water-Bath-Editorial

The northern, ironically much wetter, half of the country was aghast last month when the prospect of a hosepipe ban was floated before them. The rule only legislates against the equipment and not the water use, i.e. you could still tip the same amount of water over your garden, as long as you are not using the pipe. Oh, and it’s still ok to top up your swimming pool and wash the caravan. That repeated banging sound is my head hitting the table.

Water Kerry Lemon

With our once or even twice daily showering, long, luxurious bath’s, dishwashers, washing machines and hosepipes; We are a nation addicted to water. The government estimates that we each use about 150 litres of water a day, and rising. And right now? We couldn’t imagine our hot, hummusy lives without easy access to a glass of cold water and a cool shower. It’s a human right, right? The reality is that water is a finite resource. The days of using it with merry abandon are coming to an end, and we need to stop wasting it.

Water Michelle Urvall Nyrén

There are some glaring absurdities in our liberal water use. Whilst almost a billion people on the planet only have access to dirty, unsafe water, we flush our toilets with drinking water. This is bonkers. Most of our homes are un-metered too, meaning water is charged at a set rate. This means there is no financial incentive to reduce water use. Ofwat stats show that metered homes use much less water and save tons of money. (So, water powers that be, and Mr Cameron, please change that.)

Water Michelle Urvall Nyrén

Over the past year I have been trying to do my bit to save water, but I would also be very interested to hear your suggestions too, if you have them.

• Buy a non plastic bottle and refill it before you leave the house.
• If you have a garden, consider putting a water butt somewhere to collect water.
• If you own your house, would you consider harvesting rainwater (or greywater) to water your plants and flush your loo? Do you already do this?
• You don’t always need to flush after you wee. You probably saw this coming a mile off, but, all together now…if it’s yellow, let it mellow, if its brown, flush it down!
• Save any unfinished water dregs and pour them into a watering can or jug near the sink. Next time you need to water the plants you won’t have to fill the jug up as much.
• Instead of running the tap for ages to get cold water, put water straight out of the tap and into big bottles in the fridge.
• If you don’t have a double flush toilet you can get free water bags from Thames Water that fill up and save tons of water. Or you can just stick an old brick into the cistern.

So what’s your take on it? Are you a twice-daily-showerer, or a proud twice-a-weeker? Do you think it’s all pointless unless the government and authorities make changes? Do you already try to preserve water, and, if so, how? Couldn’t give two hoots, or are you a ‘be the change’ kinda person?

P.S. To learn more see Treehugger’s list of the top 5 documentaries to watch to understand the water crisis

Water Natasha-Thompson-Water-Umbrella-Editorial

It’s been sticky, erectile hasn’t it? The sunshine is all well and good whilst you are within spitting distance of a garden or beer garden (or a patch of pavement if you frequent the majority of London pubs), treat but battling with public transport, this with people so far in your space that they may as well be inside you is no party. Some trains still seem to have the heating on and we are incessantly reminded to consider carrying a bottle of water with us which, curiously, makes me want to punch the drivers face in. Moving in any way other than a slow glide is ghastly in the heat. As one friend put it yesterday, ‘its like moving through hummus’.

Water Fritha Strickland

Where is this tirade taking us, you wonder? It is taking us to water. Or rather the lack of it. We have all seen the adverts that contain images of people in faraway countries using buckets to scoop putrid, fly-ridden water into canisters to use as drinking and cooking water. But the reality is that these images have become so pervasive in our consciousness that they simply cease to shock us. What’s that got to do with us? Whilst we are nowhere near the poverty of many countries with minimal access to safe drinking water, as the population rises and industrialisation increases, water will become more and more precious in all parts of the world.

WaterNatasha-Thompson-Water-Bath-Editorial

The northern, ironically much wetter, half of the country was aghast last month when the prospect of a hosepipe ban was floated before them. The rule only legislates against the equipment and not the water use, i.e. you could still tip the same amount of water over your garden, as long as you are not using the pipe. Oh, and it’s still ok to top up your swimming pool and wash the caravan. That repeated banging sound is my head hitting the table.

Water Kerry Lemon

With our once or even twice daily showering, long, luxurious bath’s, dishwashers, washing machines and hosepipes; We are a nation addicted to water. The government estimates that we each use about 150 litres of water a day, and rising. And right now? We couldn’t imagine our hot, hummusy lives without easy access to a glass of cold water and a cool shower. It’s a human right, right? The reality is that water is a finite resource. The days of using it with merry abandon are coming to an end, and we need to stop wasting it.

Water Michelle Urvall Nyrén

There are some glaring absurdities in our liberal water use. Whilst almost a billion people on the planet only have access to dirty, unsafe water, we flush our toilets with drinking water. This is bonkers. Most of our homes are un-metered too, meaning water is charged at a set rate. This means there is no financial incentive to reduce water use. Ofwat stats show that metered homes use much less water and save tons of money. (So, water powers that be, and Mr Cameron, please change that.)

Water Michelle Urvall Nyrén

Over the past year I have been trying to do my bit to save water, but I would also be very interested to hear your suggestions too, if you have them.

• Buy a non plastic bottle and refill it before you leave the house.
• If you have a garden, consider putting a water butt somewhere to collect water.
• If you own your house, would you consider harvesting rainwater (or greywater) to water your plants and flush your loo? Do you already do this?
• You don’t always need to flush after you wee. You probably saw this coming a mile off, but, all together now…if it’s yellow, let it mellow, if its brown, flush it down!
• Save any unfinished water dregs and pour them into a watering can or jug near the sink. Next time you need to water the plants you won’t have to fill the jug up as much.
• Instead of running the tap for ages to get cold water, put water straight out of the tap and into big bottles in the fridge.
• If you don’t have a double flush toilet you can get free water bags from Thames Water that fill up and save tons of water. Or you can just stick an old brick into the cistern.

So what’s your take on it? Are you a twice-daily-showerer, or a proud twice-a-weeker? Do you think it’s all pointless unless the government and authorities make changes? Do you already try to preserve water, and, if so, how? Couldn’t give two hoots, or are you a ‘be the change’ kinda person?

P.S. To learn more see Treehugger’s list of the top 5 documentaries to watch to understand the water crisis

Water Natasha-Thompson-Water-Umbrella-Editorial

It’s been sticky, visit this site hasn’t it? The sunshine is all well and good whilst you are within spitting distance of a garden or beer garden (or a patch of pavement if you frequent the majority of London pubs), seek but battling with public transport, with people so far in your space that they may as well be inside you is no party. Some trains still seem to have the heating on and we are incessantly reminded to consider carrying a bottle of water with us which, curiously, makes me want to punch the drivers face in. Moving in any way other than a slow glide is ghastly in the heat. As one friend put it yesterday, ‘its like moving through hummus’.

Water Fritha Strickland

Where is this tirade taking us, you wonder? It is taking us to water. Or rather the lack of it. We have all seen the adverts that contain images of people in faraway countries using buckets to scoop putrid, fly-ridden water into canisters to use as drinking and cooking water. But the reality is that these images have become so pervasive in our consciousness that they simply cease to shock us. What’s that got to do with us? Whilst we are nowhere near the poverty of many countries with minimal access to safe drinking water, as the population rises and industrialisation increases, water will become more and more precious in all parts of the world.

WaterNatasha-Thompson-Water-Bath-Editorial

The northern, ironically much wetter, half of the country was aghast last month when the prospect of a hosepipe ban was floated before them. The rule only legislates against the equipment and not the water use, i.e. you could still tip the same amount of water over your garden, as long as you are not using the pipe. Oh, and it’s still ok to top up your swimming pool and wash the caravan. That repeated banging sound is my head hitting the table.

Water Kerry Lemon

With our once or even twice daily showering, long, luxurious bath’s, dishwashers, washing machines and hosepipes; We are a nation addicted to water. The government estimates that we each use about 150 litres of water a day, and rising. And right now? We couldn’t imagine our hot, hummusy lives without easy access to a glass of cold water and a cool shower. It’s a human right, right? The reality is that water is a finite resource. The days of using it with merry abandon are coming to an end, and we need to stop wasting it.

Water Michelle Urvall Nyrén

There are some glaring absurdities in our liberal water use. Whilst almost a billion people on the planet only have access to dirty, unsafe water, we flush our toilets with drinking water. This is bonkers. Most of our homes are un-metered too, meaning water is charged at a set rate. This means there is no financial incentive to reduce water use. Ofwat stats show that metered homes use much less water and save tons of money. (So, water powers that be, and Mr Cameron, please change that.)

Water Michelle Urvall Nyrén

Over the past year I have been trying to do my bit to save water, but I would also be very interested to hear your suggestions too, if you have them.

• Buy a non plastic bottle and refill it before you leave the house.
• If you have a garden, consider putting a water butt somewhere to collect water.
• If you own your house, would you consider harvesting rainwater (or greywater) to water your plants and flush your loo? Do you already do this?
• You don’t always need to flush after you wee. You probably saw this coming a mile off, but, all together now…if it’s yellow, let it mellow, if its brown, flush it down!
• Save any unfinished water dregs and pour them into a watering can or jug near the sink. Next time you need to water the plants you won’t have to fill the jug up as much.
• Instead of running the tap for ages to get cold water, put water straight out of the tap and into big bottles in the fridge.
• If you don’t have a double flush toilet you can get free water bags from Thames Water that fill up and save tons of water. Or you can just stick an old brick into the cistern.

So what’s your take on it? Are you a twice-daily-showerer, or a proud twice-a-weeker? Do you think it’s all pointless unless the government and authorities make changes? Do you already try to preserve water, and, if so, how? Couldn’t give two hoots, or are you a ‘be the change’ kinda person?

P.S. To learn more see Treehugger’s list of the top 5 documentaries to watch to understand the water crisis

Water Natasha-Thompson-Water-Umbrella-Editorial

It’s been sticky, recipe hasn’t it? The sunshine is all well and good whilst you are within spitting distance of a garden or beer garden (or a patch of pavement if you frequent the majority of London pubs), this web but battling with public transport, stuff with people so far in your space that they may as well be inside you is no party. Some trains still seem to have the heating on and we are incessantly reminded to consider carrying a bottle of water with us which, curiously, makes me want to punch the drivers face in. Moving in any way other than a slow glide is ghastly in the heat. As one friend put it yesterday, ‘its like moving through hummus’.

Water Fritha Strickland
Illustration by Fritha Strickland

Where is this tirade taking us, you wonder? It is taking us to water. Or rather the lack of it. We have all seen the images of people in faraway countries using buckets to scoop putrid, fly-ridden water into canisters to use as drinking and cooking water. But the reality is that these images have become so pervasive in our consciousness that they simply cease to shock us. What’s that got to do with us? Whilst we are nowhere near the poverty of many countries with minimal access to safe drinking water, as the population rises and industrialisation increases, water will become more and more precious in all parts of the world.

WaterNatasha-Thompson-Water-Bath-Editorial
Illustration by Natasha Thompson

The northern, ironically much wetter, half of the country was aghast last month when the prospect of a hosepipe ban was floated before them. The rule only legislates against the equipment and not the water use, i.e. you could still tip the same amount of water over your garden, as long as you are not using the pipe. Oh, and it’s still ok to top up your swimming pool and wash the caravan. That repeated banging sound is my head hitting the table.

Water Kerry Lemon
Illustration by Kerry Lemon

With our once or even twice daily showering, long, luxurious bath’s, dishwashers, washing machines and hosepipes; We are a nation addicted to water. The government estimates that we each use about 150 litres of water a day, and rising. And right now? We couldn’t imagine our hot, hummusy lives without easy access to a glass of cold water and a cool shower. It’s a human right, right? The reality is that water is a finite resource. The days of using it with merry abandon are coming to an end, and we need to stop wasting it.

Water Michelle Urvall Nyrén
Illustration by Michelle Urvall Nyrén

There are some glaring absurdities in our liberal water use. Whilst almost a billion people on the planet only have access to dirty, unsafe water, we flush our toilets with drinking water. This is bonkers. Most of our homes are un-metered too, meaning water is charged at a set rate. This means there is no financial incentive to reduce water use. Ofwat stats show that metered homes use much less water and save tons of money. (So, water powers that be, and Mr Cameron, please change that.)

Water Michelle Urvall Nyrén
Illustration by Michelle Urvall Nyrén

Over the past year I have been trying to do my bit to save water, but I would also be very interested to hear your suggestions too, if you have them.

• Buy a non plastic bottle and refill it before you leave the house.
• If you have a garden, consider putting a water butt somewhere to collect water.
• If you own your house, would you consider harvesting rainwater (or greywater) to water your plants and flush your loo? Do you already do this?
• You don’t always need to flush after you wee. You probably saw this coming a mile off, but, all together now…if it’s yellow, let it mellow, if its brown, flush it down!
• Save any unfinished water dregs and pour them into a watering can or jug near the sink. Next time you need to water the plants you won’t have to fill the jug up as much.
• Instead of running the tap for ages to get cold water, put water straight out of the tap and into big bottles in the fridge.
• If you don’t have a double flush toilet you can get free water bags from Thames Water that fill up and save tons of water. Or you can just stick an old brick into the cistern.

So what’s your take on it? Are you a twice-daily-showerer, or a proud twice-a-weeker? Do you think it’s all pointless unless the government and authorities make changes? Do you already try to preserve water, and, if so, how? Couldn’t give two hoots, or are you a ‘be the change’ kinda person?

P.S. To learn more see Treehugger’s list of the top 5 documentaries to watch to understand the water crisis

Water Natasha-Thompson-Water-Umbrella-Editorial
Illustration by Natasha Thompson

It’s been sticky, approved hasn’t it? The sunshine is all well and good whilst you are within spitting distance of a garden or beer garden (or a patch of pavement if you frequent the majority of London pubs), cure but battling with public transport, page with people so far in your space that they may as well be inside you is no party. Some trains still seem to have the heating on and we are incessantly reminded to consider carrying a bottle of water with us which, curiously, makes me want to punch the drivers face in. Moving in any way other than a slow glide is ghastly in the heat. As one friend put it yesterday, ‘its like moving through hummus’.

Water Fritha Strickland
Illustration by Fritha Strickland

Where is this tirade taking us, you wonder? It is taking us to water. Or rather the lack of it. We have all seen the images of people in faraway countries using buckets to scoop putrid, fly-ridden water into canisters to use as drinking and cooking water. But the reality is that these images have become so pervasive in our consciousness that they simply cease to shock us. What’s that got to do with us? Whilst we are nowhere near the poverty of many countries with minimal access to safe drinking water, as the population rises and industrialisation increases, water will become more and more precious in all parts of the world.

WaterNatasha-Thompson-Water-Bath-Editorial
Illustration by Natasha Thompson

The northern, ironically much wetter, half of the country was aghast last month when the prospect of a hosepipe ban was floated before them. The rule only legislates against the equipment and not the water use, i.e. you could still tip the same amount of water over your garden, as long as you are not using the pipe. Oh, and it’s still ok to top up your swimming pool and wash the caravan. That repeated banging sound is my head hitting the table.

Water Kerry Lemon
Illustration by Kerry Lemon

With our once or even twice daily showering, long, luxurious bath’s, dishwashers, washing machines and hosepipes; We are a nation addicted to water. The government estimates that we each use about 150 litres of water a day, and rising. And right now? We couldn’t imagine our hot, hummusy lives without easy access to a glass of cold water and a cool shower. It’s a human right, right? The reality is that water is a finite resource. The days of using it with merry abandon are coming to an end, and we need to stop wasting it.

Water Michelle Urvall Nyrén
Illustration by Michelle Urvall Nyrén

There are some glaring absurdities in our liberal water use. Whilst almost a billion people on the planet only have access to dirty, unsafe water, we flush our toilets with drinking water. This is bonkers. Most of our homes are un-metered too, meaning water is charged at a set rate. This means there is no financial incentive to reduce water use. Ofwat stats show that metered homes use much less water and save tons of money. (So, water powers that be, and Mr Cameron, please change that.)

Water Michelle Urvall Nyrén
Illustration by Michelle Urvall Nyrén

Over the past year I have been trying to do my bit to save water, but I would also be very interested to hear your suggestions too, if you have them.

• Buy a non plastic bottle and refill it before you leave the house.
• If you have a garden, consider putting a water butt somewhere to collect water.
• If you own your house, would you consider harvesting rainwater (or greywater) to water your plants and flush your loo? Do you already do this?
• You don’t always need to flush after you wee. You probably saw this coming a mile off, but, all together now…if it’s yellow, let it mellow, if its brown, flush it down!
• Save any unfinished water dregs and pour them into a watering can or jug near the sink. Next time you need to water the plants you won’t have to fill the jug up as much.
• Instead of running the tap for ages to get cold water, put water straight out of the tap and into big bottles in the fridge.
• If you don’t have a double flush toilet you can get free water bags from Thames Water that fill up and save tons of water. Or you can just stick an old brick into the cistern.

So what’s your take on it? Are you a twice-daily-showerer, or a proud twice-a-weeker? Do you think it’s all pointless unless the government and authorities make changes? Do you already try to preserve water, and, if so, how? Couldn’t give two hoots, or are you a ‘be the change’ kinda person?

P.S. To learn more see Treehugger’s list of the top 5 documentaries to watch to understand the water crisis


Illustration by Abi Daker

A while back I happened to catch a performance by Lissie at the Old Queens Head in Angel. I hadn’t planned on watching her – truth be told, viagra 40mg I was there to check out the band before her; but my curiosity was piqued as I watched the room fill up with an expectant and excited audience, view all craning their necks and standing on their tippy toes to get a better view of the girl serenading us. It’s been a while since I saw someone so captivating. Golden haired, freckled and just a slip of a thing, Lissie entranced the room who in turn treated her to a hushed and reverential silence, punctuated only by bursts of spirited applause and cheers. I watched the audience watching her. Everyone seemed transported out of their location; away from the top room of a pub on grimy old Essex Road and into the world that Midwestern native come Californian girl Lissie inhabits, laced with the scent of orange blossom, filled with wide open skies, winding rivers and smokey mountains, and night-times spent on porches with nothing but a guitar, a couple of beers and a pack of Marlboro Reds . No wonder we were all enchanted.

A couple of weeks later, I got to meet the busy Lissie. In the time between, Lissie had appeared on Jools Holland, toured around Europe, duetted with Ellie Goulding at The Great Escape, and graced the airwaves, all in the name of the hectic promotion of her debut album, Catching a Tiger (hot on the heels of the release of last years Why You Runnin’ EP). The phrase ‘riding a juggernaut’ comes to mind with Lissie; bursting into our consciousness with the brightest of starts. The day we met was a rare moment of down time; her touring schedule is in a constant state of flux – stretching to accommodate gigs that are being added on a daily basis, and Lissie had only just made it back from the previous nights gigs in Manchester and Newcastle. Curled up wearing her newest acquisition – a red jacket with white piping brought from a charity shop up North which made her look, she remarked cheerily, like “Santa Claus”, she lamented the ever decreasing amount of free time but was laughingly quick to note that it’s “a quality problem- it’s only busy because it’s going well, if no-one liked the music then there wouldn’t be things for me to do!” As Amelia’s Magazine is nothing if not versatile in its roles, I was happy to take on the guise of English Tourist Board representative, and suggest a list of places to visit when she finally gets a day off; though when that day will be, we will never know! ( FYI, Lissie was especially keen on the visit to Hampton Court Palace idea). As she munched on a healthy beetroot salad – my lunch advice was a visit to Jerk City in Soho for some fattening salt fish patties; probably best that not all of my suggestions get listened to) – I decided to find out just where this free-spirited songbird got her start in life.

“I always loved to sing, I was a pretty outspoken, strong willed little kid! I got a little shyer and more introverted when I got older but as a kid I used to stomp my feet when I walked (swings arms in a very determined manner), I was always talkin’… My family were really sweet and encouraging, but at school I would get into a lot of trouble because I would talk back, I always knew what was best for me, and when other people used to tell me what was best for me, I would be like “uh oh! Not gonna do it!” (laughs) I loved to sing, so becoming a songwriter was a great way for me to express my feelings, you know. I wasn’t always great at talking about things, and so I could write these little melodies…. even as a little kid, I would sing my feelings. I sang to my sister; I do recall tape recording this mean song about her, and leaving a tape recorder about her under her bedroom door and then pressing play and running away! (laughs) And then in high school I went through my phase of being more introverted – I pierced my nose, got a tattoo, started smoking,….I did my own thing cause I didn’t really fit in to any particular group. I started writing music, taught myself guitar and then started working at this coffee shop where I could play.”

What type of music were you listening to then?
Music wise, when I was younger I was into folk, Americana, musical theatre, and then in high school I was into country and gangsta rap

Those are two very different genres!
You wouldn’t think that these are similar in any way, but when you listen to either country or rap, it’s people telling their story. Indie rock can be more obtuse or obscure. Country and rap is some one speaking in the first person, you know? It’s more like, “this is my story, this is my experience.”

Do you respond to music that is more heartfelt and honest?
Totally, but I like all kinds of stuff. Although I don’t really listen to music to get inspired for my own music.

Did you move to California immediately after high school?
First I went to Colorado, to go to study at Colorado State. I was playing music and sang with a DJ there, and he ended up getting our song placed on tv shows. That was a catalyst for me; I realised that I could make a living making music, maybe eventually a good living! And then I went and did a semester of school (our version of uni) in Paris. I was singing there as well; I met a woman who helped me get shows in bars, and I also got some stuff played on college radio. After that I dropped out of school, and moved to LA – only cause I figured that that’s where you go when you want to be a singer!


Illustration by Abi Daker

Comparisons have been made to the hazy and bohemian rock n’ roll that came out of Laurel Canyon in the 70′s (think Joni Mitchell, The Doors, and Stevie Nicks). Lissie’s 2010 version is honed from living in an area not more than a mile or two away; Beachwood Canyon, a creative hub of artists and musicians and a world away from the plastic glamour and sheen of Beverly Hills. Los Angeles is known for chewing up and spitting up many a wide eyed starlet and ingenue, but strong-willed Lissie was never going to be one of the victims….
I don’t know if it’s me being stubborn, or being from the Mid West, but….I’m not bullshit, I don’t want bullshit in my life. I’m still nice, you know? I was never tempted by (the LA madness.) I always knew what I wanted to do. And I wasn’t immediately successful… I had figured that by 22 I was gonna make a record, and I didn’t make one till I was 26. But I was never like “I’m never going to be successful, maybe I need to be skinnier, or prettier, or I need to start doing drugs!

A year ago (while dealing with the messy end of a relationship) Lissie made a decision – part gut instinct, part cosmic order – to leave LA and head north to the tranquil town of Ojai, a place that she had never even stepped foot in…

Do you get inspired by the peace of Ojai?
Unfortunately I was more inspired to write when I was in Hollywood, because there was more to get worked up about. (sighs) There was this guy that I dated…… we broke up and our breakup process was drawn out and painful, which gave me a lot of material (laughs). Part of the reason why I moved was because it felt like my family was broken, and I needed a change. I put it out there; I was on a plane coming back from Tennessee and…. sometimes I just say what I want, and try to have faith that it will happen, and this is the weird thing; I found myself sitting next to two people who lived in Ojai, and I told them that I was heading back to LA, and they suggested I visit Ojai. So I got back to LA and instantly knew that I couldn’t be there; there was something in me that said “you have to move to Ojai, even though I had never been there before!” I went online, and found this house that cost less than my apartment in LA . I put down a deposit and moved, gone! And it was the best thing for me. I totally healed my heart there, and got myself in a position where I could really focus on myself, and what I need to do. I live alone, with my dog, I go for walks – it’s so peaceful.

While you’re here, you have a summer of touring in England?
Yeah, every day we get a revised schedule. We’re (Lissie and her band) doing festivals for the next few months, and in October, November and December there will be at least one thing a month going on in England, so it’s unclear whether we will just stay here or start our momentum in the States, ’cause I still have to go promote my album over there. I don’t exactly know what’s going to be happening, but it’s all good.

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