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Top 25 Art Blog - Creative Tourist

The Warmest Chord

Introducing a homemade record label that combines music and screen print releases, plus all manner of delicious trimmings.

Written by Cari Steel

Jean-Pierre Braganza A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory
Jean-Pierre Braganza by Catherine Askew
Jean-Pierre Braganza A/W 2011 by Catherine Askew.

Ponytails, viagra sale red eye make up, cure close fitting suits, dosage black, lots of black. A male model with razor sharp cheekbones and a hilarious female model with superlative head throwing posing skills. This is what Jean-Pierre Braganza showed at the Northumberland House, a new grandiose LFW location.

Jean-Pierre Braganza A/W 2011 by Jane Young
Jean-Pierre Braganza A/W 2011 by Jane Young.

After loitering in the magnificent reception area we were ushered into the huge ballroom, passing by the backstage area which looked suspiciously like the back of a Hollywood lot.

Jean-Pierre Braganza A/W 2011 by Kerri-Ann Hulme
Jean-Pierre Braganza A/W 2011 by Kerri-Ann Hulme.

Positronyx was a sexily provocative collection dominated by sharp tailoring and beautiful pattern cutting in a predominantly monochrome palette, bar a nod to that boldest of colours, pillar box red. This cropped up in dashing geometric tiger-like striped print and on bam bam look-at-me suits for both men and women, but it was across the breast and curving around the hips of a particularly stunning embroidered dress that it enthralled me most.

Jean-Pierre Braganza A/W 2011 by Emmi Ojala
Jean-Pierre Braganza A/W 2011 by Emmi Ojala.

A quick scan of the show press release reveals that when designing Jean-Pierre Braganza had in mind strong female warrior leaders, perhaps existing in a future world where “tribal affiliation has replaced the current societal controls, and clothing becomes even more imperative for identity, security and culture.” He certainly designs for the bold and assertive lady – creating sexy armour that wouldn’t look out of place on the prowl at a cocktail party.

I was less keen on the sponsored fur elements. But let’s not mention those, eh? It was an otherwise fabulous collection.
Jean-Pierre Braganza by Catherine Askew
Jean-Pierre Braganza A/W 2011 by Catherine Askew.

Ponytails, order red eye make up, price close fitting suits, black, lots of black. A male model with razor sharp cheekbones and a hilarious female model with superlative head throwing posing skills. This is what Jean-Pierre Braganza showed at the Northumberland House, a new grandiose LFW location.

Jean-Pierre Braganza A/W 2011 by Jane Young
Jean-Pierre Braganza A/W 2011 by Jane Young.

Northumberland House
Northumberland House.

After loitering in the magnificent reception area we were ushered into the huge ballroom, passing by the backstage area which looked suspiciously like the back of a Hollywood lot.

Jean-Pierre Braganza A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryJean-Pierre Braganza A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryJean-Pierre Braganza A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryJean-Pierre Braganza A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryJean-Pierre Braganza A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryJean-Pierre Braganza A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory
Jean-Pierre Braganza A/W 2011 by Kerri-Ann Hulme
Jean-Pierre Braganza A/W 2011 by Kerri-Ann Hulme.

Positronyx was a sexily provocative collection dominated by sharp tailoring and beautiful pattern cutting in a predominantly monochrome palette, bar a nod to that boldest of colours, pillar box red. This cropped up in dashing geometric tiger-like striped print and on bam bam look-at-me suits for both men and women, but it was across the breast and curving around the hips of a particularly stunning embroidered dress that it enthralled me most.

Jean-Pierre Braganza A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryJean-Pierre Braganza A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryJean-Pierre Braganza A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryJean-Pierre Braganza A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory
Jean-Pierre Braganza A/W 2011 by Emmi Ojala
Jean-Pierre Braganza A/W 2011 by Emmi Ojala.

A quick scan of the show press release reveals that when designing Jean-Pierre Braganza had in mind strong female warrior leaders, perhaps existing in a future world where “tribal affiliation has replaced the current societal controls, and clothing becomes even more imperative for identity, security and culture.” He certainly designs for the bold and assertive lady – creating sexy armour that wouldn’t look out of place on the prowl at a cocktail party.

Jean-Pierre Braganza A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryJean-Pierre Braganza A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryJean-Pierre Braganza A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryJean-Pierre Braganza A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryJean-Pierre Braganza A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryJean-Pierre Braganza A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryJean-Pierre Braganza A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryJean-Pierre Braganza A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryJean-Pierre Braganza A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory

I was less keen on the sponsored fur elements. But let’s not mention those, eh? It was an otherwise fabulous collection.

Jean-Pierre Braganza A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryJean-Pierre Braganza A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryJean-Pierre Braganza A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryJean-Pierre Braganza A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryJean-Pierre Braganza A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryJean-Pierre Braganza A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryJean-Pierre Braganza A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryJean-Pierre Braganza A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryJean-Pierre Braganza A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryJean-Pierre Braganza A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory
Jean-Pierre Braganza A/W 2011. All photography by Amelia Gregory.
Jean-Pierre Braganza by Catherine Askew
Jean-Pierre Braganza A/W 2011 by Catherine Askew.

Ponytails, viagra 60mg red eye make up, cheapest close fitting suits, approved black, lots of black. A male model with razor sharp cheekbones and a hilarious female model with superlative head throwing posing skills. This is what Jean-Pierre Braganza showed at the Northumberland House, a new grandiose LFW location.

Jean-Pierre Braganza A/W 2011 by Jane Young
Jean-Pierre Braganza A/W 2011 by Jane Young.

Northumberland House
Northumberland House.

After loitering in the magnificent reception area we were ushered into the huge ballroom, passing by the backstage area which looked suspiciously like the back of a Hollywood lot.

Jean-Pierre Braganza A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryJean-Pierre Braganza A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryJean-Pierre Braganza A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryJean-Pierre Braganza A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryJean-Pierre Braganza A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryJean-Pierre Braganza A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory
Jean-Pierre Braganza A/W 2011 by Kerri-Ann Hulme
Jean-Pierre Braganza A/W 2011 by Kerri-Ann Hulme.

Positronyx was a sexily provocative collection dominated by sharp tailoring and beautiful pattern cutting in a predominantly monochrome palette, bar a nod to that boldest of colours, pillar box red. This cropped up in dashing geometric tiger-like striped print and on bam bam look-at-me suits for both men and women, but it was across the breast and curving around the hips of a particularly stunning embroidered dress that it enthralled me most.

Jean-Pierre Braganza A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryJean-Pierre Braganza A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryJean-Pierre Braganza A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryJean-Pierre Braganza A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory
Jean-Pierre Braganza A/W 2011 by Emmi Ojala
Jean-Pierre Braganza A/W 2011 by Emmi Ojala.

A quick scan of the show press release reveals that when designing Jean-Pierre Braganza had in mind strong female warrior leaders, perhaps existing in a future world where “tribal affiliation has replaced the current societal controls, and clothing becomes even more imperative for identity, security and culture.” He certainly designs for the bold and assertive lady – creating sexy armour that wouldn’t look out of place on the prowl at a cocktail party.

Jean-Pierre Braganza A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryJean-Pierre Braganza A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryJean-Pierre Braganza A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryJean-Pierre Braganza A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryJean-Pierre Braganza A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryJean-Pierre Braganza A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryJean-Pierre Braganza A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryJean-Pierre Braganza A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryJean-Pierre Braganza A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory

I was less keen on the sponsored fur elements. But let’s not mention those, eh? It was an otherwise fabulous collection.

Jean-Pierre Braganza A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryJean-Pierre Braganza A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryJean-Pierre Braganza A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryJean-Pierre Braganza A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryJean-Pierre Braganza A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryJean-Pierre Braganza A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryJean-Pierre Braganza A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryJean-Pierre Braganza A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryJean-Pierre Braganza A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryJean-Pierre Braganza A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory
Jean-Pierre Braganza A/W 2011. All photography by Amelia Gregory.

You can read Matt Bramford’s superb review here, and view more of Emmi Ojala’s work in Amelia’s Anthology of Illustration.
Jean-Pierre Braganza by Catherine Askew
Jean-Pierre Braganza A/W 2011 by Catherine Askew.

Ponytails, stomach red eye make up, close fitting suits, black, lots of black. A male model with razor sharp cheekbones and a hilarious female model with superlative head throwing posing skills. This is what Jean-Pierre Braganza showed at the Northumberland House, a new grandiose LFW location.

Jean-Pierre Braganza A/W 2011 by Jane Young
Jean-Pierre Braganza A/W 2011 by Jane Young.

Northumberland House
Northumberland House.

After loitering in the magnificent reception area we were ushered into the huge ballroom, passing by the backstage area which looked suspiciously like the back of a Hollywood film lot.

Jean-Pierre Braganza A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryJean-Pierre Braganza A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryJean-Pierre Braganza A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryJean-Pierre Braganza A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryJean-Pierre Braganza A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryJean-Pierre Braganza A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory
Jean-Pierre Braganza A/W 2011 by Kerri-Ann Hulme
Jean-Pierre Braganza A/W 2011 by Kerri-Ann Hulme.

Positronyx was a sexily provocative collection dominated by sharp tailoring and beautiful pattern cutting in a predominantly monochrome palette, bar a nod to that boldest of colours, pillar box red. This cropped up in a dashing geometric tiger-like striped print and on bam bam look-at-me suits for both men and women, but it was across the breast and curving around the hips of a particularly stunning embroidered dress that it enthralled me most.

Jean-Pierre Braganza A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryJean-Pierre Braganza A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryJean-Pierre Braganza A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryJean-Pierre Braganza A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory
Jean-Pierre Braganza A/W 2011 by Emmi Ojala
Jean-Pierre Braganza A/W 2011 by Emmi Ojala.

A quick scan of the show press release reveals that when designing Jean-Pierre Braganza had in mind strong female warrior leaders, perhaps existing in a future world where “tribal affiliation has replaced the current societal controls, and clothing becomes even more imperative for identity, security and culture.” He certainly designs for the bold and assertive lady – creating sexy armour that wouldn’t look out of place on the prowl at a cocktail party.

Jean-Pierre Braganza A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryJean-Pierre Braganza A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryJean-Pierre Braganza A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryJean-Pierre Braganza A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryJean-Pierre Braganza A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryJean-Pierre Braganza A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryJean-Pierre Braganza A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryJean-Pierre Braganza A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryJean-Pierre Braganza A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory

I was less keen on the sponsored fur elements. But let’s not mention those, eh? It was an otherwise fabulous collection.

Jean-Pierre Braganza A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryJean-Pierre Braganza A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryJean-Pierre Braganza A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryJean-Pierre Braganza A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryJean-Pierre Braganza A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryJean-Pierre Braganza A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryJean-Pierre Braganza A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryJean-Pierre Braganza A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryJean-Pierre Braganza A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryJean-Pierre Braganza A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory
Jean-Pierre Braganza A/W 2011. All photography by Amelia Gregory.

You can read Matt Bramford’s superb review here, and view more of Emmi Ojala’s work in Amelia’s Anthology of Illustration.
Emilio de la Morena by Faye West
Emilio de la Morena LFW A/W 2011 Collection: Illustration by Faye West

Apparently Emilio de la Morena has lengthened his silhouette. His pieces are now touching, this site or over the knee, decease ‘signalling a new direction that is stricter and more refined.’ The body con is still there of course, check remaining tighter than a wetsuit, and both wigglier and feistier than Mad Men’s, Joan. That’s exactly what the collection made me think of: Joan and Jessica Rabbit. This translates to: HOT… but sophisticated.

Red Charlotte Olympia shoes featured throughout the show. Now, I’ve always been a fan of red shoes. From ballet to sky scraping, red shoes are sweet vixens, minxes, all playful and naughty. But less; “stop it Roger” and more; “Roger I want champagne, oysters and Chanel. Get them!” She needs a man, not a wimp. She will wear her shoes in the bath, and probably won’t speak to Roger much before or after – whatever happens between them. She’s an old school dressed WOMAN, not a girl, and she expects to be treated with respect. Like the stroppier ones in James Bond films, this woman can kick some ass. And answer back with cutting looks and witty, snappy words.

Emilio de la Morena LFW A/W 2011 Amelia GregoryEmilio de la Morena LFW A/W 2011 Amelia GregoryEmilio de la Morena LFW A/W 2011 Amelia GregoryEmilio de la Morena LFW A/W 2011 Amelia GregoryEmilio de la Morena LFW A/W 2011 Amelia GregoryEmilio de la Morena LFW A/W 2011 Amelia Gregory
Emilio de la Morena LFW A/W 2011 Collection: Photography by Amelia Gregory

Other Charlotte Olympia shoes included a suede ankle boot and platform sandals in three colours, black, red, powder pink and ivory. All utterly lust-worthy. Heaven. The colour palette mirrors Emilio de la Morena Autumn/Winter collection, which focuses on black, dark purple and RED. The sombre tones of this show, inspired by the work of the American photographer Francesca Woodman and the circumstances surrounding her suicide in New York, in 1981, aged just 22. Her photographs are hauntingly beautiful and predominantly black and white. Emilio de la Morena wanted to reflect these sad circumstances, with his use of passionate, bruised and mourning colours. These give way however, to ivory and powder pink, making for delicate prettiness, next to the block melancholy. Together, the designs look classy, serious and fantastic. I see these beautiful women by the graves of Italian gangsters, weeping. They are hard, stunning and controlled, but what they love – they adore with all their hearts.

Emilio de la Morena LFW A/W 2011 Amelia GregoryEmilio de la Morena LFW A/W 2011 Amelia GregoryEmilio de la Morena LFW A/W 2011 Amelia GregoryEmilio de la Morena LFW A/W 2011 Amelia GregoryEmilio de la Morena LFW A/W 2011 Amelia GregoryEmilio de la Morena LFW A/W 2011 Amelia Gregory
Emilio de la Morena LFW A/W 2011 Collection: Photography by Amelia Gregory

Victoriana also featured within Emilio de la Morena’s collection, but with a modern, sheer twist. Bib decoration and high necklines created from sheer, frayed and tufted organza, make it lighter, sexier and contemporary. The longer length, wool pencil skirts also featured sheer organza. With panels, embroidered in swirling, zig zagging ribbon, created in the material, as well as silk inserts. The additions allowing for fluidity of movement.

The collection felt serious and respectfully attractive. Not flirty, terribly young, overly romantic or precocious. Instead very sensual and confident. The red stole the show. However, like red lipstick on a make up less face, it looked the most alluring, when it was paired with the other other colours. The eyes and lips are too much – alone they are beautiful. Such a bright red needed the other colours to avoid being lost, and to stand out as a solitary statement. And you know, if the three women were sobbing by the grave, each with an accent of red, just imagine… scandalous, stylish, powerful and mysterious RED.

This screen print by Franz Vesolt accompanies the release of Wild Nothing’s ‘Evertide’ EP.

Music and art have always made the best of bedfellows, for sale so it seems only natural to create a record label that aspires to have musicians and artists support each other through bespoke collaborations. Here’s the premise: each full Warmest Chord release consists of three exclusive tracks and a limited numbered A3 screen print designed by an independent illustrator in direct response to the music. Go to their lovingly prepared blog and you can read about their new inspirations, physician ideas and designs, whether it be for a screen print, cover art, a jigsaw or knitting pattern that will accompany their song releases. (And it was a real treat for us to see that the Warmest Chord logo and headermast was created by the illustrator Hannah Warren, whose work featured in Amelia’s Anthology of Illustration). We talked to Becky Randall, one of the founders of Warmest Chord to learn more about this highly creative endeavor.

Tell me the premise behind the idea of the Warmest Chord Record label.

The label was pretty much born out of a desire of wanting to collaborate, create something from scratch, and to offer up something a little different from the standard somewhat cold digital download. We wanted to play around with some ideas and explore other possibilities by adding a craft and handmade element into the mix of download releases. We felt it was only right to offset downloads with beautiful physical artwork that you can own, admire, hang and create attachment and a visual counterpart to the music.

For the second release we introduced downloadable liner notes and also Warmest Chord ‘Calling Cards’ which are handpicked images from scrapbooks, old publications, vintage community magazines, old postcards etc. Each one is a one-off and handstamped by Warmest Chord. We do an edition of 50 per release and we put them in at random with purchases of the screen print. This visual and physical element is really important to us and we want to create a trusted home for new music adding different art ephemera and collectibles with each release.

Who do you have signed at the moment and what type of music are you hoping to sign in the future?

Warmest Chord is still very much a fledgling label as we’ve only had two releases out so far. Our first was the ‘Evertide’ EP from Wild Nothing coupled with a phosphorescent screen print from French illustrator Franz Vesolt. Our second release was from newcomer Slow Talk hand-in-hand with a print from Micah Lidberg. The overwhelming support and little messages from well-wishers and fans was really positive and highlighted just how open music lovers can be to new ideas and combinations. As for the future, our doors, eyes and ears are truly open.


Tell us a little about the artists that you are working with on the screen print side.

For the Wild Nothing release we brought Franz Vesolt on board, an illustrator who focuses on characters and figures, and has an unerring ability to stir up the emotions with a simple line drawing. We felt that he complimented and aestheticised the emotive music of Wild Nothing perfectly. And in comparison to that, there are the bold songs from Slow Talk with just a hint of menace and vulnerability in the mix, which illustrator Micah Lidberg aptly manifested with his twisted vision of nature run wild with colour.


This screenprint by Micah Lidberg is sold alongside the new release by Slow Talk

For each release we’re going to be introducing a new illustrator, and carefully pairing them with the music to ensure they go together like the finest bread and cheese. We also invite them to make-over our logo/ headermast to essentially ‘christen’ each release. Each run of screen prints is limited to just 100, and we endeavour to make each one a beautifully crafted piece of collectible custom-made art that adds value and attachment to the music.



Wild Nothing’s haunting interpretation of the iconic ‘Cloudbusting’ can be brought from the Warmest Chord shop

Turning to the business side; what was your background before this, was it art, or music related?

A little bit of both actually! I studied art at university, tried to write for a living but got very very poor in the process, worked in music promotions then at a couple of labels big and small. I continue to be a fairly free floating entity with fingers in lots of honey jars, including managing the bands Still Corners and The Proper Ornaments

The other half of Warmest Chord spends most of his time begging DJ’s to play records on the radio, as well as running a great little 7”-only label called Make Mine. We both kind of landed on our bellies into the world of Warmest Chord and we’re very pleased that we did.


Steven Ross from Slow Talk. Photograph by Jane Anne Duddleston

How was this label set up, did you receive funding?  And is this a full time job for everyone at Warmest Chord? 

We’re both based in London, and had to dig deep into our pockets, bumbags, piggy banks and sofa cushions in order to make Warmest Chord happen. There are just two of us at the label and we wrap it around our day jobs using every stolen moment we can fit in our Warmest Chord swag bag in order to indulge another little facet for the label.

What is your long term goals with Warmest Chord?

To keep Warmest Chord a very free and mutable entity, keep building on the craft and visual element, provide a forum for interesting music and always keep an open mind and a flirtatious eye. We’re currently busy working on our next rather special release. But we’re fond of surprises so won’t say any more or the broth will be ruined.


Another example of Micah Lidberg’s stunning illustrations.

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