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Top 25 Art Blog - Creative Tourist

Pre-LFW interview: Orschel-Read

In the last interview of the series, Amelia's magazine caught up with the popular menswear designer ahead of his forthcoming show...

Written by Rachael Oku

LFW_CharlieLeMindu_01

Who cares if womenswear is wearable? As a gent, recipe generic I certainly don’t. Hair stylist to the stars, more about buy more about Charlie Le Mindu opened the On|Off shows yesterday – winning zero points for wearability, viagra buy but a whopping 10 out of 10 for wow factor.

Charlie has been styling hair for shoots and shows for ages now, but his first catwalk show, as part of Blow Presents, was only last year. In the six months between then and now, he’s had time to polish his wares, and this time we had an even deeper delve into his psyche…

LFW_CharlieLeMindu_Illustration
Illustration by Maryanne Oliver

With the sound of church bells welcoming a funeral cortege, the first model appeared with a giant, jewel-encrusted cross atop her sleek black wig. Wearing a most provocative outfit made of lace, Le Mindu’s pieces lie somewhere between your wildest dreams and your darkest nightmares.

LFW_CharlieleMindu_02

As the pounding music kicked in, with screams of ‘CHARLIE” peppered in the track, the stream of models slowly sauntered down the catwalk, expressionless and lost in their own thoughts. The outfits became racier – with one model, wearing a huge hair-trimmed construction, having little but a thick pony tail to hide her modesty.

LFW_CharlieleMindu_03

While Charlie’s SS 2010 show was all about the blonde, AW 2010 was definitely all about black. Black, black black. Black lace, black hair, black shoes and black knickers. Any use of colour would have ruined the drama of fashion’s favourite colour.

LFW_CharlieleMindu_04

The most prominent theme was undoubtedly death, with crucifixes, ashen skin and hair/head pieces influenced by the mantilla. Whilst some might find Le Mindu’s creations a little on the silly side, the craftsmanship, attention to detail and range of techniques he employs are outstanding. He’s comparable to the few designers who really push the boundaries, and, like dearly beloved McQueen, he toys with raw and emotive subjects. And when it’s not hair, it’s stoles with cuddly-toy heads or bird feathers.

LFW_CharlieleMindu_05

Amongst a hell of a lot of designers who’ve taken to playing it safe in these turbulent financial times, thank GOD for Charlie Le Mindu.

LFW_CharlieleMindu_06

LFW_CharlieLeMindu_01

Who cares if womenswear is wearable? As a gent, shop I certainly don’t. Hair stylist to the stars, price Charlie Le Mindu opened the On|Off shows yesterday – winning zero points for wearability, but a whopping 10 out of 10 for wow factor.

Charlie has been styling hair for shoots and shows for ages now, but his first catwalk show, as part of Blow Presents, was only last year. In the six months between then and now, he’s had time to polish his wares, and this time we had an even deeper delve into his psyche…

LFW_CharlieLeMindu_Illustration
Illustration by Maryanne Oliver

With the sound of church bells welcoming a funeral cortege, the first model appeared with a giant, jewel-encrusted cross atop her sleek black wig. Wearing a most provocative outfit made of lace, Le Mindu’s pieces lie somewhere between your wildest dreams and your darkest nightmares.

LFW_CharlieleMindu_02

As the pounding music kicked in, with screams of ‘CHARLIE” peppered in the track, the stream of models slowly sauntered down the catwalk, expressionless and lost in their own thoughts. The outfits became racier – with one model, wearing a huge hair-trimmed construction, having little but a thick pony tail to hide her modesty.

LFW_CharlieleMindu_03

While Charlie’s SS 2010 show was all about the blonde, AW 2010 was definitely all about black. Black, black black. Black lace, black hair, black shoes and black knickers. Any use of colour would have ruined the drama of fashion’s favourite colour.

LFW_CharlieleMindu_04

The most prominent theme was undoubtedly death, with crucifixes, ashen skin and hair/head pieces influenced by the mantilla. Whilst some might find Le Mindu’s creations a little on the silly side, the craftsmanship, attention to detail and range of techniques he employs are outstanding. He’s comparable to the few designers who really push the boundaries, and, like dearly beloved McQueen, he toys with raw and emotive subjects. And when it’s not hair, it’s stoles with cuddly-toy heads or bird feathers.

LFW_CharlieleMindu_05

Amongst a hell of a lot of designers who’ve taken to playing it safe in these turbulent financial times, thank GOD for Charlie Le Mindu.

LFW_CharlieleMindu_06

What was it like collaborating with Pavel Rudanovsky on the conceptual ‘UnFashion Show’ series?
‘UnFashion’ was a great platform to test out ideas of what can be presented under the umbrella of a ‘fashion show’. We integrated contemporary dance and ballet, here alongside experimental live music and three dimensional interactive sets, here into a fashion show with a narrative. It helped me work out the balance between the need for spectacle in a show and the need to exhibit a garment design in manner where it can be clearly understood.

01 Orschel-Read SS10 photographer Paul MorganImagery throughout depicting Orschel-Read SS10, buy photographed by Paul Morgan

Did you always know that you wanted to design couture for men or is this something you realised upon studying at Central Saint Martins?
I launched my ready-to-wear label at London Fashion Week in September 2009. I showed it alongside the bespoke collection. I knew I wanted to design for men long before I studied at Central Saint Martins, but it was while I was there that I pursued the concept of couture for men. We are at an exciting time in menswear where couture for men is once again relevant; it is no longer solely for kings and emperors, it is for you and I.

09 Orschel-Read SS10 photographer Paul Morgan

How did you break into the fashion industry, and do you have any advice for our readers on things they can do to stand out in the industry?
Starting up a label is a very large gamble especially in the current economic climate. It is important to understand that the financial and time commitments will far exceed what you initially estimate! I strongly suggest that if starting your own label is something you aim to do, that you seek a few internships with new generation labels. It is in these situations where you can understand all the processes that you will need to undertake yourself when starting your own brand.

14 Orschel-Read SS10 photographer Paul Morgan

You’ve recently had a couple of designs worn by Lady Gaga, who showed that your designs can be worn and adapted into a woman’s wardrobe. Are you happy for women to wear your clothing, and what was it like working with Lady Gaga?
I see no divide between man and woman. We have differences but far more similarities. Therefore of course I was pleased that Lady Gaga chose to wear my menswear.

15 Orschel-Read SS10 photographer Paul Morgan

Is there any one man that you would love to see wearing your designs, who you feel sums up your ethos as a designer?
I would have loved to have dressed the late Henry Cyril Paget, 5th Marquis of Anglesey. Known to his friends as ‘Toppy’, he looked like an Aubrey Beardsley illustration. Beyond eccentric, he had his car modified to spray perfume from its exhaust, walked with a poodle bedecked with pink bows under his arm and hired an entire theatre company with whom he performed almost nightly to entertain his servants and the locals of Bangor. What I admire lies beneath his seemingly frivolous bejewelled exterior. He was a true social agitator and living artwork. He forced people to reconsider preconceived notions of what was acceptable in a male. He could not simply be categorised as a mere eccentric and therefore socially tolerable within a walled-off heterotopia. He was an avant-garde, who like Marchesa Luisa Casati, Quentin Crisp and David Bowie, irreversibly reshaped the opinions of the panoptic mainstream.

18 Orschel-Read SS10 photographer Paul Morgan

What is your inspiration for FW10, and what can we expect from your upcoming LFW fashion show/presentation?
The foundations of this collection come from the ceiling mural of Stockholm’s Storkyrkan cathedral and the subtle beauty of female birds, with William Morris inspired prints. This season I am focusing on balancing tailoring with a classic sportswear feel, in earthy tweeds, digitally printed leathers, knit and fine tailoring wools. As always it is designed and produced in-house in London.

27 Orschel-Read SS10 photographer Paul Morgan

How do you unwind after the stresses of LFW?
Last season I took a break and enjoyed some quiet time at home. Mistake! I hated the anticlimax. So this year I will seek distraction and go on holiday.

28 Orschel-Read SS10 photographer Paul Morgan

What has been your career’s biggest highlight to date?Every time I produce a bespoke garment that supersedes the client’s expectations I experience the greatest contentment and reward available within my career choice.

30 Orschel-Read SS10 photographer Paul Morgan

Is there anything in particular that you are looking forward to accomplishing this decade?
I look forward to being part of a grand revolution within menswear that has already begun. My show on the 24th of February with Vauxhall Fashion Scout is my next explorative submission towards this.

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