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Top 25 Art Blog - Creative Tourist

A review of the Tarradiddle Exhibition

Lauren Mortimer, formerly of Amelia's Magazine, was one of the artists exhibiting when all female arts collective Martha held a pop up exhibition at Hackney City Farm in early June. But what does Tarradiddle mean? Read on...

Written by Oliver Johnson


Illustration by Gemma Milly of Zara Gorman’s Millinery.

Over the last few years the RCA’s MA Fashion course has quietly been producing a series of designers who have reinvented their particular disciplines – from menswear designers James Long and Katie Eary to womenswear’s Michael van der Ham, page Erdem and Holly Fulton (whose influence could already be seen on the Bournemouth catwalk). All of whom (except Erdem ) subsequently showed at London Fashion Week via Lulu Kennedy’s Fashion East.

The RCA MA course actually consists of several different courses from Millinery (a course of one) in which Zara Gorman showed her exquisitely shaped hats…

Illustration by Katie Harvey

to Womenswear and Menswear knit, troche accessories, nurse shoes and of course Womenswear and Menswear. The press release listed the words of inspiration that described the various elements of design the graduates of 2010 presented. It was slightly disconcerting to see the world ‘Chav’ being used as an inspiration, a word created by the press to demean those that wore Burberry Check head to toe (Pre Christopher Bailey Hello Danielle Westbrook) it’s connotations appear to be similar to Noveau Rich – those with money and no taste.

A look celebrated and parodied by Ab Fab’s Eddie and her love for trends and ‘hot’ designers, It’s impossible to not know she’s wearing a ‘designer’. Astrid Andersen plays with fashion’s ability to celebrate and pastiche it’s own brand at the same time on the same item (think LV’s monogrammed bags or Moschino Jeans). Her menswear is certainly not forgettable with its construction of the base elements of sportswear. Nor was Courtney McWilliams’s take on casual wear in which the t-shirts and jackets proudly beared that particularly English symbol: the pit-bull.

Illustration by Joseph Keirs

This was an incredible exhibition of the craft, research and invention that is currently occurring within the Fashion Department of the RCA.

Menswear designer Trine Jensen presented breathtaking sweaters embroided with charms (as in bracelet) to hoops.

Victoria Stone’s cut up shirts… Illustration By Marnie Hollande

Sam McCoach’s tubular womenswear knit Illustration by Lesley Barnes

Poppy Cartwright’s white PVC collection produced fantastic shapes, her combination of high shine against the matt fabric embellished through the subtle addition of white embroidery.

All illustrations by Naomi Law

Frances Convey’s colour and shapes

Illustration by Katie Harvey

Yuri Yuferev cages presented dramatic feminine shapes harden through the materials positioning around the body.

Illustration by Lesley Barnes

The monochrome creped collection by Cecile Bahnsen came complete with 1990′s inspired sportswear jackets. Elements of grunge reappeared through the designers choice of length – often the dresses hang tightly around the ankle. Flashes of Amber from clueless appear with the presentation of the Fez hat. It’s that time already. The revival of the 1990′s.

Illustration by Marnie Hollande

Bahnsen’s graphic monochrome was interspersed with cut out pieces was softened through the pastel pink colouring.

This is but a small selection from the class of 2010, the more this reviewer revisits the look book accompanying the show the more previously unnoticed details emerge from these young designers collections.

Illustration by Gemma Milly of Zara Gorman’s Millinery.

Over the last few years the RCA’s MA Fashion course has quietly been producing a series of designers who have reinvented their particular disciplines – from menswear designers James Long and Katie Eary to womenswear’s Michael van der Ham, this Erdem and Holly Fulton (whose influence could already be seen on the Bournemouth catwalk). All of whom (except Erdem ) subsequently showed at London Fashion Week via Lulu Kennedy’s Fashion East.

The RCA MA course actually consists of several different courses from Millinery (a course of one) in which Zara Gorman showed her exquisitely shaped hats constructed from a combination of leather, purchase wood and plastic.

Illustration by Katey Harvey

to knitwear, accessories, shoes and of course Womenswear and Menswear. The press release listed the words of inspiration that described the various elements of design the graduates of 2010 presented. It was slightly disconcerting to see the world ‘Chav’ being used as an inspiration, a word created by the press to demean those that wore Burberry Check head to toe (Pre Christopher Bailey Hello Danielle Westbrook) it’s connotations appear to be similar to Noveau Rich – those with money and no taste.

A look celebrated and parodied by Ab Fab’s Eddie and her love for trends and ‘hot’ designers, It’s impossible to not know she’s wearing a ‘designer’. Astrid Andersen plays with fashion’s ability to celebrate and pastiche it’s own brand at the same time on the same item (think LV’s monogrammed bags or Moschino Jeans). Her menswear is certainly not forgettable with its construction of the base elements of sportswear. Nor was Courtney McWilliams’s take on casual wear in which the t-shirts and jackets proudly beared that particularly English symbol: the pit-bull.

Illustration by Joseph Keirs

This was an incredible exhibition of the craft, research and invention that is currently occurring within the Fashion Department of the RCA.

Menswear designer Trine Jensen presented breathtaking sweaters embroided with charms (as in bracelet) to hoops.

Victoria Stone’s cut up chiffon shirts in conjunction with her oversized suits presented a more masculine take on womenswear, a look for those inspired by Woody Allen’s Annie Hall Illustration By Marnie Hollande

Sam McCoach’s tubular womenswear knit sashed down the catwalk. Illustration by Lesley Barnes

The ankle grazing dresses set off by the rounded shapes of the graphic coats. The collection was muted accessoried with tubular jewellery and flat shoes.

Poppy Cartwright’s white PVC collection produced fantastic shapes, her combination of high shine against the matt fabric embellished through the subtle addition of white embroidery.

All illustrations by Naomi Law

Frances Convey’s colour and shapes

Illustration by Katie Harvey

Yuri Yuferev cages presented dramatic feminine shapes harden through the materials positioning around the body.

Illustration by Lesley Barnes

The monochrome creped collection by Cecile Bahnsen came complete with 1990′s inspired sportswear jackets. Elements of grunge reappeared through the designers choice of length – often the dresses hang tightly around the ankle. Flashes of Amber from clueless appear with the presentation of the Fez hat. It’s that time already. The revival of the 1990′s.

Illustration by Marnie Hollande

Bahnsen’s graphic monochrome was interspersed with cut out pieces was softened through the pastel pink colouring.

This is but a small selection from the class of 2010, an almost impossible decision to make, as the more this reviewer revisited the show’s look book, previously unnoticed details consistently emerge from these young designers collections.

Illustration by Gemma Milly of Zara Gorman’s Millinery.

Over the last few years the RCA’s MA Fashion course has quietly been producing a series of designers who have reinvented their particular disciplines – from menswear designers James Long and Katie Eary to womenswear’s Michael van der Ham, page Erdem and Holly Fulton (whose influence could already be seen on the Bournemouth catwalk). All of whom (except Erdem ) subsequently showed at London Fashion Week via Lulu Kennedy’s Fashion East.

The RCA MA course actually consists of several different courses from Millinery (a course of one) in which Zara Gorman showed her exquisitely shaped hats constructed from a combination of leather, approved wood and plastic.

Illustration by Katey Harvey

to knitwear, accessories, shoes and of course Womenswear and Menswear. The press release listed the words of inspiration that described the various elements of design the graduates of 2010 presented. It was slightly disconcerting to see the world ‘Chav’ being used as an inspiration, a word created by the press to demean those that wore Burberry Check head to toe (Pre Christopher Bailey Hello Danielle Westbrook) it’s connotations appear to be similar to Noveau Rich – those with money and no taste.

A look celebrated and parodied by Ab Fab’s Eddie and her love for trends and ‘hot’ designers, It’s impossible to not know she’s wearing a ‘designer’. Astrid Andersen plays with fashion’s ability to celebrate and pastiche it’s own brand at the same time on the same item (think LV’s monogrammed bags or Moschino Jeans). Her menswear is certainly not forgettable with its construction of the base elements of sportswear. Nor was Courtney McWilliams’s take on casual wear in which the t-shirts and jackets proudly beared that particularly English symbol: the pit-bull.

Illustration by Joseph Keirs

This was an incredible exhibition of the craft, research and invention that is currently occurring within the Fashion Department of the RCA.

Menswear designer Trine Jensen presented breathtaking sweaters embroided with charms (as in bracelet) to hoops.

Victoria Stone’s cut up chiffon shirts in conjunction with her oversized suits presented a more masculine take on womenswear, a look for those inspired by Woody Allen’s Annie Hall Illustration By Marnie Hollande

Sam McCoach’s tubular womenswear knit sashed down the catwalk. Illustration by Lesley Barnes

The ankle grazing dresses set off by the rounded shapes of the graphic coats. The collection was muted accessoried with tubular jewellery and flat shoes.

Poppy Cartwright’s white PVC collection produced fantastic shapes, her combination of high shine against the matt fabric embellished through the subtle addition of white embroidery.

All illustrations by Naomi Law

Frances Convey’s colour and shapes were a moment of joy, continuing the rounded shoulder shape of the jacket currently popular.

Illustration by Katie Harvey

The monochrome creped collection by Cecile Bahnsen came complete with 1990′s inspired sportswear jackets. Elements of grunge reappeared through the designers choice of length – often the dresses hang tightly around the ankle. Flashes of Amber from clueless appear with the presentation of the Fez hat. It’s that time already. The revival of the 1990′s.

Illustration by Marnie Hollande

Bahnsen’s graphic monochrome was interspersed with cut out pieces was softened through the pastel pink colouring.

Yuri Yufere presented dramatic feminine shapes harden through the materials cage like positioning around the body, the collection also included softer pieces of block patterned dresses complete with see through jacket.

Illustration by Lesley Barnes

This is but a small selection from the class of 2010, an almost impossible decision to make, as the more this reviewer revisited the show’s look book, previously unnoticed details consistently emerge from these young designers collections.

Illustration by Gemma Milly of Zara Gorman’s Millinery.

Over the last few years the RCA’s MA Fashion course has quietly been producing a series of designers who have reinvented their particular disciplines – from menswear designers James Long and Katie Eary to womenswear’s Michael van der Ham, clinic Erdem and Holly Fulton (whose influence could already be seen on the Bournemouth catwalk). All of whom (except Erdem ) subsequently showed at London Fashion Week via Lulu Kennedy’s Fashion East.

The RCA MA course actually consists of several different courses from Millinery (a course of one) in which Zara Gorman showed her exquisitely shaped hats constructed from a combination of leather, wood and plastic.

Illustration by Katey Harvey

to knitwear, accessories, shoes and of course Womenswear and Menswear. The press release listed the words of inspiration that described the various elements of design the graduates of 2010 presented. It was slightly disconcerting to see the world ‘Chav’ being used as an inspiration, a word created by the press to demean those that wore Burberry Check head to toe (Pre Christopher Bailey Hello Danielle Westbrook) it’s connotations appear to be similar to Noveau Rich – those with money and no taste.

A look celebrated and parodied by Ab Fab’s Eddie and her love for trends and ‘hot’ designers, It’s impossible to not know she’s wearing a ‘designer’. Astrid Andersen plays with fashion’s ability to celebrate and pastiche it’s own brand at the same time on the same item (think LV’s monogrammed bags or Moschino Jeans). Her menswear is certainly not forgettable with its construction of the base elements of sportswear. Nor was Courtney McWilliams’s take on casual wear in which the t-shirts and jackets proudly beared that particularly English symbol: the pit-bull.

Illustration by Joseph Keirs

This was an incredible exhibition of the craft, research and invention that is currently occurring within the Fashion Department of the RCA.

Menswear designer Trine Jensen presented breathtaking sweaters embroided with charms (as in bracelet) to hoops.

Victoria Stone’s cut up chiffon shirts in conjunction with her oversized suits presented a more masculine take on womenswear, a look for those inspired by Woody Allen’s Annie Hall Illustration By Marnie Hollande

Sam McCoach’s tubular womenswear knit sashed down the catwalk. Illustration by Lesley Barnes

The ankle grazing dresses set off by the rounded shapes of the graphic coats. The collection was muted accessoried with tubular jewellery and flat shoes.

Poppy Cartwright’s white PVC collection produced fantastic shapes, her combination of high shine against the matt fabric embellished through the subtle addition of white embroidery.

All illustrations by Naomi Law

Frances Convey’s colour and shapes were a moment of joy, continuing the rounded shoulder shape of the jacket currently popular.

Illustration by Katie Harvey

The monochrome creped collection by Cecile Bahnsen came complete with 1990′s inspired sportswear jackets. Elements of grunge reappeared through the designers choice of length – often the dresses hang tightly around the ankle. Flashes of Amber from clueless appear with the presentation of the Fez hat. It’s that time already. The revival of the 1990′s.

Illustration by Marnie Hollande

Bahnsen’s graphic monochrome was interspersed with cut out pieces was softened through the pastel pink colouring.

Yuri Yufere presented dramatic feminine shapes harden through the materials cage like positioning around the body, the collection also included softer pieces of block patterned dresses complete with see through jacket.

Illustration by Lesley Barnes

This is but a small selection from the class of 2010, an almost impossible decision to make, as the more this reviewer revisited the show’s look book, previously unnoticed details consistently emerge from these young designers collections.
Lauren-Mortimer-Kids-With-Guns
Kids With Guns by Lauren Mortimer.

Last week saw the opening of Tarradiddle, viagra order an exhibition showcasing the combined talents of nine artists of the recently founded all-female collective ‘Martha’, each exploring an experimental mode of story-telling through their work. The private view took place on 7th June 2010 opposite the Hackney City Farm in London’s East End, and saw the pop-up gallery space full to bursting with people over two floors who came for an eclectic mix of art (and the amazing hand made biscuits!). There was a real collective feel to the show as the works themselves sat in harmony alongside one another, a variety of mediums from paintings, illustration, through video and sculpture.

Sorcha-O'brien-open-closed
Open Closed by Sorcha O’brien.

I got a real sense of a dark, almost menacing undercurrent throughout this exhibition with a subtext to each piece that I’m keen to discover. What I found infectious was the way this tone is transformed into an uplifting experience right through the artwork on show.

Lauren-Mortimer-Swing-Cannon
Swing Cannon by Lauren Mortimer.

Upstairs had work ranging from the beautifully playful, yet disturbing illustrations of Lauren Mortimer depicting children in typical childhood scenarios with a sinister twist, her subject’s childhood naivety contrasting brilliantly with the haunting, ethereal subjects of Linda Hemmersbach’s paintings. Zosienka Gibb’s work continued in a similar character driven vain with a series of portraits depicting characters from ‘The Master and the Margarita’, the novel by Mikhail Bulgakov, her images smattered with traces of symbolism and influenced by an African, British and Eastern European childhood.

Linda-Hemmersbach
Art by Linda Hemmersbach.
Zosia-Gibbs
Work from Zosia Gibbs.

I found Marina Rees’ work captivating, adding variety and depth to the show through a combination of sculpture and images made using a host of unusual natural materials, that examine the human relationship with animals.

Marina-Rees-polar-mask
Polar Mask by Marina Rees.

The lower level was dedicated entirely to moving image, and was split between the work of Jade Mortimer and Sarah Blaszczok. Jade’s work dominated the centre of the room with set pieces accompanying a sumptuously shot film depicting two character’s mysteriously ominous encounter, based around some unique pistol shaped decanters marketed in the 1960’s by Avon. Sarah’s film was similarly intriguing with it’s wordless narrative showing events unfold as the characters carry out mundane and repeated acts, the result was in equal parts both sinister and ridiculous.

Jade-Mortimer-New-World
Jade-Mortimer-New-World-still
New World by Jade Mortimer.

The show’s biggest appeal lay in the sense of an unspoken story being told throughout the exhibition, and an incentive to pay close attention to all the work that was on show. My own desire to explore what I saw here stemmed not only from a visceral reaction to the art itself, but to make my own sense of the ambiguity within each piece. It was an exhibition cohesive in themes and ideas, and was undoubtedly a rewarding overall show. The word Tarradiddle means a concocted story or fib, and it’s definitely one I whole heartedly recommend trying to debunk.

Tarradiddle-exhibition

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2 Responses to “A review of the Tarradiddle Exhibition”

  1. [...] I have another note to share. Tarradiddle has been reviewed for Amelia’s Magazine. Please read… [...]

  2. [...] Olly kindly wrote a review of the show for Amelia’s [...]

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