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Top 25 Art Blog - Creative Tourist

London Fashion Week A/W 2011 Catwalk Review: Jasper Garvida (by Amelia)

Jasper Garvida showed his A/W 2011 collection Le Baiser at Freemasons Hall on Friday 18th February 2011. Here's my review with illustrations by Maria Papadimitriou, Madi, Sandra Contreras and newcomer Toni Bowater.

Written by Amelia Gregory

Emily Jane White by LJG Art & Illustration
Illustration by Laura Godfrey, troche link LG Illustration

I know that folk music isn’t all organic, ambulance whole foods, pill and love – or indeed deep lust – buried in a haystack. Happy all day, before campfires and passions at night. No, folk musicians don’t spend their days wearing slightly grubby lumberjacks or floaty, ethereal frocks. See evidence: Grizzly Bear aren’t happy all the time and Bon Iver is a delightfully melancholy chap. And then just listen to Nick Drake and young Laura Marling. To be honest I’m not really sure where I got the skippy, clappy, dancing in the hazy afternoon sunshine vision from. Perhaps it’s because folk artists tend to sing about the earth, nature and love in one breath. There is no chat of ‘honeys’ or ‘bling’. Gah, And of course, folkers may be generally creative and appreciative of the natural world, but it in no means leaves them exempt of sadness, hurt and darkness. I wonder, does it in actual fact make them more open and adept to describing their feelings than the blingers? Regardless, folk is often as rhythmic and warming as the grandfather clock that my 40s’ Grandpa chopped the bottom of, to fit in his house. Tick, tock. Folk is cosy and true, which is why it feels so pure – which is why it makes me want to reside in a yurt.

Emily Jane White - Sarah Matthews
Illustration by Sarah Matthews

Let me introduce you to Emily Jane White. The PR sheet in-front of me says that her album is: ‘a collection of ten opulent, uncluttered and captivating ballads.’ A friend asked me other day, “If you had to only use one adjective for the rest of your life, what would it be?” If I was a news writer, I would say: “Peh, what even are adjectives?”. As a PR I would pass out. Whilst as a writer of my own devices, I would say – ‘blissful’. Then I could put ‘anti’ in-front of a word perhaps. Awkward. Anyway, off on a tangent again: Emily Jane White’s music is BLISSFUL.

See:

She is melancholy. But in the way that makes you feel perhaps strangely, very contented. Maybe it is because in a sense Emily is making peace with herself and her thoughts through the act of writing her music. She said that she found writing her latest album, Ode To Sentience, out now on Talitres Records, cathartic to write: “They speak to the emotional simplicity and complexity of human relationship. I chose to call the record Ode To Sentience because it is the capacity to feel that creates a share human experience of music. We all share the potency of music by having the capacity to feel, and I found the simplicity of this fact very beautiful.”

‘Tis true.

emily Jane White
Illustration by Laura Godfrey, LG Illustration

Her album is about leaving home, her’s was California – I Lay To Rest (California) – the drawn out strings longing to leave. The sharper notes; the sadness of leaving it. Clipped Wings is ghostly and full of yearning, reflections of love’s passed. The Cliff holds classic American twangs, whilst Oh Katherine, is a string filled heaven of a song. Her voice is as soft and delicate as a peach, whilst her fearless approach to singing from the darker depths of her consciousness matches the strings perfectly.

She is much like a Californian Kate Bush, but less obviously ethereal and screaming. Or she could be a gentler Alela Diane or singular Mountain Man. Black Silk has to be my personal favourite. The Law is guitar based, slow and… actually quite a lot like my Grandpa’s Grandfather clock. It wraps you up. Says it’s all ok. For a little bit of this, here we have ‘The Law’, for you to download for free: here. Download it now.

emily

Emily Jane White’s Album, Ode to Sentience is available now on Talitres Records.

Emily Jane White by LJG Art & Illustration
Illustration by Laura Godfrey, visit this LG Illustration

I know that folk music isn’t all organic, price whole foods, advice and love – or indeed deep lust – buried in a haystack. Happy all day, before campfires and passions at night. No, folk musicians don’t spend their days wearing slightly grubby lumberjacks or floaty, ethereal frocks. See evidence: Grizzly Bear aren’t happy all the time and Bon Iver is a delightfully melancholy chap. And then just listen to Nick Drake and young Laura Marling. To be honest I’m not really sure where I got the skippy, clappy, dancing in the hazy afternoon sunshine vision from. Perhaps it’s because folk artists tend to sing about the earth, nature and love in one breath. There is no chat of ‘honeys’ or ‘bling’. Gah, And of course, folkers may be generally creative and appreciative of the natural world, but it in no means leaves them exempt of sadness, hurt and darkness. I wonder, does it in actual fact make them more open and adept to describing their feelings than the blingers? Regardless, folk is often as rhythmic and warming as the grandfather clock that my 40s’ Grandpa chopped the bottom of, to fit in his house. Tick, tock. Folk is cosy and true, which is why it feels so pure – which is why it makes me want to reside in a yurt.

Emily Jane White - Sarah Matthews
Illustration by Sarah Matthews

Let me introduce you to Emily Jane White. The PR sheet in-front of me says that her album is: ‘a collection of ten opulent, uncluttered and captivating ballads.’ A friend asked me other day, “If you had to only use one adjective for the rest of your life, what would it be?” If I was a news writer, I would say: “Peh, what even are adjectives?”. As a PR I would pass out. Whilst as a writer of my own devices, I would say – ‘blissful’. Then I could put ‘anti’ in-front of a word perhaps. Awkward. Anyway, off on a tangent again: Emily Jane White’s music is BLISSFUL.

See:

She is melancholy. But in the way that makes you feel perhaps strangely, very contented. Maybe it is because in a sense Emily is making peace with herself and her thoughts through the act of writing her music. She said that she found writing her latest album, Ode To Sentience, out now on Talitres Records, cathartic to write: “They speak to the emotional simplicity and complexity of human relationship. I chose to call the record Ode To Sentience because it is the capacity to feel that creates a share human experience of music. We all share the potency of music by having the capacity to feel, and I found the simplicity of this fact very beautiful.”

‘Tis true.

emily Jane White
Illustration by Laura Godfrey, LG Illustration

Her album is about leaving home, her’s was California – I Lay To Rest (California) – the drawn out strings longing to leave. The sharper notes; the sadness of leaving it. Clipped Wings is ghostly and full of yearning, reflections of love’s passed. The Cliff holds classic American twangs, whilst Oh Katherine, is a string filled heaven of a song. Her voice is as soft and delicate as a peach, whilst her fearless approach to singing from the darker depths of her consciousness matches the strings perfectly.

She is much like a Californian Kate Bush, but less obviously ethereal and screaming. Or she could be a gentler Alela Diane or singular Mountain Man. Black Silk has to be my personal favourite. The Law is guitar based, slow and… actually quite a lot like my Grandpa’s Grandfather clock. It wraps you up. Says it’s all ok. For a little bit of this, here we have ‘The Law’, for you to download for free: here. Download it now.

emily

Emily Jane White’s Album, Ode to Sentience is available now on Talitres Records.

Emily Jane White by LJG Art & Illustration
Illustration by Laura Godfrey, look LG Illustration

I know that folk music isn’t all organic, doctor whole foods, and love – or indeed deep lust – buried in a haystack. Happy all day, before campfires and passions at night. No, folk musicians don’t spend their days wearing slightly grubby lumberjacks or floaty, ethereal frocks. See evidence: Grizzly Bear aren’t happy all the time and Bon Iver is a delightfully melancholy chap. And then just listen to Nick Drake and young Laura Marling. To be honest I’m not really sure where I got the skippy, clappy, dancing in the hazy afternoon sunshine vision from. Perhaps it’s because folk artists tend to sing about the earth, nature and love in one breath. There is no chat of ‘honeys’ or ‘bling’. Gah, And of course, folkers may be generally creative and appreciative of the natural world, but it in no means leaves them exempt of sadness, hurt and darkness. I wonder, does it in actual fact make them more open and adept to describing their feelings than the blingers? Regardless, folk is often as rhythmic and warming as the grandfather clock that my 40s’ Grandpa chopped the bottom of, to fit in his house. Tick, tock. Folk is cosy and true, which is why it feels so pure – which is why it makes me want to reside in a yurt.

Emily Jane White - Sarah Matthews
Illustration by Sarah Matthews

Let me introduce you to Emily Jane White. The PR sheet in-front of me says that her album is: ‘a collection of ten opulent, uncluttered and captivating ballads.’ A friend asked me other day, “If you had to only use one adjective for the rest of your life, what would it be?” If I was a news writer, I would say: “Peh, what even are adjectives?”. As a PR I would pass out. Whilst as a writer of my own devices, I would say – ‘blissful’. Then I could put ‘anti’ in-front of a word perhaps. Awkward. Anyway, off on a tangent again: Emily Jane White’s music is BLISSFUL.

See:

She is melancholy. But in the way that makes you feel perhaps strangely, very contented. Maybe it is because in a sense Emily is making peace with herself and her thoughts through the act of writing her music. She said that she found writing her latest album, Ode To Sentience, out now on Talitres Records, cathartic to write: “They speak to the emotional simplicity and complexity of human relationship. I chose to call the record Ode To Sentience because it is the capacity to feel that creates a share human experience of music. We all share the potency of music by having the capacity to feel, and I found the simplicity of this fact very beautiful.”

‘Tis true.

emily Jane White
Illustration by Laura Godfrey, LG Illustration

Her album is about leaving home, her’s was California – I Lay To Rest (California) – the drawn out strings longing to leave. The sharper notes; the sadness of leaving it. Clipped Wings is ghostly and full of yearning, reflections of love’s passed. The Cliff holds classic American twangs, whilst Oh Katherine, is a string filled heaven of a song. Her voice is as soft and delicate as a peach, whilst her fearless approach to singing from the darker depths of her consciousness matches the strings perfectly.

She is much like a Californian Kate Bush, but less obviously ethereal and screaming. Or she could be a gentler Alela Diane or singular Mountain Man. Black Silk has to be my personal favourite. The Law is guitar based, slow and… actually quite a lot like my Grandpa’s Grandfather clock. It wraps you up. Says it’s all ok. For a little bit of this, here we have ‘The Law’, for you to download for free: here. Download it now.

emily

Emily Jane White’s Album, Ode to Sentience is available now on Talitres Records.


Illustration by Lesley Barnes

So Saturday morning – day two of London Fashion Week – started off brilliantly. It was p*ssing it down, medicine the tyre on my bike had deflated itself twice and I didn’t have a clue what I was doing. Gallantly, search if I do say so myself, I hot-stepped it to work to put some articles together, and then when it was time made my way to The Show Space on Northumberland Avenue (where I had been the previous day to view Jean Pierre Braganza’s collection) armed with an umbrella.

Unfortunately, the rest of London’s fashion population were also armed with umbrellas (despite wearing some outfits best saved for hot Summer evenings – gah) and queuing was a bit of a nightmare. Luckily I bumped into my pal Sabrina from The Science of Style, and we huddled together in the queue and waited. And waited. And waited some more. Eventually a call was made for orange stickers and we were ushered inside, and while we waited even more for the show to start, Sabrina filled me in on the gossip with some of the front row-ers.


Illustration by Katie Walters

I’ve always liked Bernard’s aesthetic – always vibrant with an exotic feel. This time around didn’t disappoint, and his signature architectural pieces were on form along with some other softer, flattering designs. Blinding hues of magenta and bursts of orange lit up the catwalk (and our cold, damp hearts) which appeared on hooded dresses and were welcomed on on shift dresses with flamboyantly embroidered patterns that looked like heart-monitor graphs, cutting muted grey dresses in half.


Illustration by Lesley Barnes

This being autumn/winter, there was a unsurprising amount of black in the collection (a bugger to photograph alongside acid brights), with one of my favourite pieces in the collection being an enormous cocoon-like knee-length jacket with exaggerated shoulders and geometric details – confirming Chandran’s status as a showman. Other black jackets were sexed up with neon tights and accessories.

Strutured dresses focussed on waists with details with dresses meeting there and extending away from the body – Chandran creates silhouettes that flatter the fashion-forward woman.

The collection progressed with feathered showpieces in rich reds and bright orange – a pure delight – and a red expertly-embellished onesie. But it was back to black to close the show – an all-in-one covered in delicate feathers and jewels – reminding us of Bernard’s exotic heritage and innate attention to detail.

All photography by Matt Bramford

See more of Lesley Barnes’ illustrations in Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration. Read Helen’s fab write-up of this show here!

Jasper Garvida A/W 2011 by Maria Papadimitriou
Jasper Garvida A/W 2011 by Maria Papadimitriou.

As anyone who attends the shows will know, ask guessing who has priority tickets is always an amusing game. Is it the gold star? Surely double gold star is better? Or maybe this season purple or neon yellow signifies top cat for a certain PR? Jasper Garvida tickets certainly had us guessing – we were sent quite a handful, purchase some with green dots on and all with the exciting words VIP. I made an educated guess that VIP with green dot was the most prestigious bet and I got it wrong – green dot was lesser.

Jasper Garvida A/W 2011 by Madi
Jasper Garvida A/W 2011 by Madi
Jasper Garvida A/W 2011 by Madi.

So it was that I found myself twiddling my thumbs as a bunch of friendly bloggers were whisked ahead of me, viagra approved all gabbling excitedly about the “washing machine cocktail party” that they had just attended courtesy of Miele, who had then popped them straight in a taxi to the Freemasons Hall where they were ushered onto the front row. At the end of the day the best sticker to have wasn’t VIP at all, it simply had the immortal word Miele stamped on it.

Jasper Garvida A/W 2011 by Toni Bowater
Jasper Garvida A/W 2011 by Toni Bowater.

Jasper Garvida‘s A/W 2011 collection was titled Le Baiser, meaning The Kiss, and was inspired by a confluence of East and West. It featured feminine tailoring with a distinctly vintage feel that was emphasised by the glamourous neatly swept up hairstyles and crystal drop earrings by Lucas Jack.

Jasper Garvida A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryJasper Garvida A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryJasper Garvida A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryJasper Garvida A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryJasper Garvida A/W 2011 by Toni Bowater
Jasper Garvida A/W 2011 by Toni Bowater.

Jasper Garvida A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryJasper Garvida A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryJasper Garvida A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryJasper Garvida A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryJasper Garvida A/W 2011 by Sandra Contreras
Jasper Garvida A/W 2011 by Sandra Contreras.

The strong opening outfit was a gorgeous black cylindrical backless dress, followed by a series of elegant grey numbers that featured cutouts to reveal the hips, thighs and back. Shoulders were draped, dropped and covered in armour-like sliced plastic embellishments that swung lazily as the models walked. Colour broke through in the form of a stunning chartreuse one shouldered dress followed by silky Fornasetti inspired circular prints and a bold giant keyhole placement print on rusty silk. Gigantic ruffles provided a key focus, counter-balancing the precise and beautiful tailoring.

Jasper Garvida A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryJasper Garvida A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryJasper Garvida A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory
Jasper Garvida A/W 2011. All photography by Amelia Gregory.

Eventually russet gave way to a searing orangey red, quite definitely the colour of the season, but also in this instance noticeably the colour of the large Miele goodie bags under the front row seats. Without so much as a glance at my press release it was obvious to me that these were sponsored garments. Perfect for this season’s trends, but what happens next time round?

Jasper Garvida A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryJasper Garvida A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryJasper Garvida A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryJasper Garvida A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryJasper Garvida A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory
Jasper Garvida A/W 2011. All photography by Amelia Gregory.

I left slightly bemused by the tenuous connection between domestic appliances and high fashion, but this was nevertheless a collection to remember. Anyway, as I know only too well, you’ve got to get your sponsorship where you can.

Jasper Garvida A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryJasper Garvida A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryJasper Garvida A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryJasper Garvida A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryJasper Garvida A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryJasper Garvida A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryJasper Garvida A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory
Jasper Garvida A/W 2011. All photography by Amelia Gregory.

You can read Katie Antoniou’s blog about the same show right here.

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