London Fashion Week S/S 2012 Catwalk Review: Jayne Pierson (featuring Pierson Lawlor)

Jayne Pierson and The Royal Ballet dancers wowed the crowd at the haunting LSO venue on Old Street on Sunday 18 September with a unique S/S 2012 show…

Written by Matt Bramford


Jayne Pierson S/S 2012, illustrated by Gareth A Hopkins

Oof, I love a new fashion week site. I took a Boris from the action at Somerset House all the way to Old Street to see Jayne Pierson‘s show at the LSO St Luke’s venue. This historic Anglican church is almost three hundred years old, and was rescued by the LSO when controversial plans to turn the beauty into offices were proposed. Thank heavens.


Jayne Pierson S/S 2012, illustrated by Tina Reidy

The church is set in a beautiful garden, and as I sweated my way through it, I thought what a romantic setting for a fashion show. These are thoughts I only have when suffering from sleep deprivation and RFSI (Repetitive Fashion Show Injury). Inside, some of the former glory has gone to make way for inevitable modernisations, but the imposing ceiling and cold stone walls still exist. A catwalk had been temporarily constructed where the aisle would once have been, and a film played on loop at the end of a photography shoot starring a rather dishy ballet dancer. It was all very exciting.


Photography by Amelia Gregory

The show eventually started after the mandatory bunfight for seats and flashbulb shower for Pandemonia. A man whose name I didn’t have a chance to write down explained that, this season, Jayne Pierson had worked with the ballet and we were in for a treat. The models were to be ballet dancers. I almost audibly ‘whooped’ at how refreshing it all was.


Jayne Pierson S/S 2012, illustrated by Gabriel Ayala

Models appeared cheekily from behind a partition, moving gracefully down the catwalk en pointe. I know this is one of life’s wonders and people train for years to get this right, but it doesn’t half make me cringe (perhaps that’s Black Swan‘s influence, too). I imagine the agony you put your body through to achieve such a graceful poise.


Photography by Matt Bramford

A mixture of male and female models appeared, wearing Jayne Piersons S/S 2012 collection. This was clearly a collection influenced by dance and drama of all kind. They floated past, some faster than others, some acting a little like they might have been drinking, but nonetheless looking equally as beautiful. The theatrics, as splendid as they were, did distract a little from the clothes, and it’s only since I’ve reviewed my pictures that I’ve got a real flavour for what Jayne Pierson has produced this season.


Jayne Pierson S/S 2012, illustrated by Gilly Rochester

Jayne Pierson‘s now statement shapes flooded the catwalk; exaggerated shoulders, tight waists. Corsets in high-gloss leather were playfully applied to looser garments in similar colours. Micro shorts were leather. A muted graphic print was used on a dangerous bikini and a halterneck onesie. Modest pastel vests had been sexed up with black pom-pom like shoulder details. A bodycon dress carried theatrical orange fringing; sophistication, glamour and exquisite craftsmanship evident in every piece.


Jayne Pierson S/S 2012, illustrated by Gareth A Hopkins

Jayne Pierson‘s clever use of material and colour was as evident as it has been during her five fashion week outings. Leathers, suedes and silks all flow organically throughout this cohesive collection, helped along by a colour palette of stone, taupe, grey, champagne and sand.


Photography by Amelia Gregory

I’m not sure if it was the Royal Ballet dancing element having an influence, but the clothes were very dramatic, and I did wonder what they might look like modelled in the usual fashion. But a finale that brought the dancers pairing up to perform some dramatic lifts really raised eyebrows and audible gasps echoed around St Luke’s. Sitting across from me, it was clear Caryn Franklin loved it. And I did too.


Photography by Matt Bramford

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