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Top 25 Art Blog - Creative Tourist

New Young Pony Club – Lost A Girl – Single Review

NYPC Are Back

Written by Cari Steel

cameralovinproperdesatredOn Saturday 23rd January at 12pm over 2000 photographers gathered in Trafalgar Square in protest at Section 44 of the Terrorism Act 2000, dosage which allows police greater powers to stop and search photographers.  The demonstration was organized by the group I’m a Photographer, recipe Not A Terrorist via facebook and twitter.  Armed with a borrowed compact piece of shite and hardly able to call myself a photographer, I went to investigate.  My subsequent two hours of extreme camera-envy were, thankfully, balanced out by a humorous and lively demo with a huge turn-out, friendly crowd and serious civil liberties message.
crowd1placardscroppedcrowd
“We must work together now to stop this before photography becomes a part of history rather than a way of recording it” states PHNAT’s website.  The arrests of high-profile photographers arrested under section 44 have contributed to the immediacy of the message. But while the Met’s website gives a very measured description of police powers to intervene in media-related activity, many photographers complain that these powers are frequently abused, and the law and photographers’ rights are very unclear. 2suspectreport

Winding its way through the centre of the crowd, a ‘Vigilance Committee’, closely protected by a man on stilts in a helmet/balaclava/CCTV strapped-to-head ensemble (we should definitely all take a leaf out of his fashion bible and don portable CCTV cameras, for our own security), arrested random, unsuspecting photographers in a stop and search parody. 
marrtile2
arresttile copy
As soon as the stop-and-search ‘guilt certificate’ they used (below) was completed, they proclaimed their suspects guilty and gave them two penalty options: six years forced labour or life-time contributor to the Vigilance Committee.  Most chose six years’ forced labour.
guiltcertificate

One professional told me at the end of the demo ‘ our hope is that by organizing this demonstrations we’ll make the police re-think their strategies.  The freedom to record and document history is a really important one, and a lot of press photographers are experiencing increasing difficulty with the police’.  Magda, a photography student from Poland told me: ‘I’m just here because I want to make the point that just because you have a camera, it doesn’t make you a terrorist or a criminal.  I heard about this on facebook but I didn’t expect to find so many people!  I’m tired of being treated suspiciously when I take photos at demonstrations for example, at times and places where it’s really important to accurately record what’s going on, and my boyfriend, who works for a magazine here, has been stopped by the police quite a few times.  I’m not against anti-terrorism measures, but it seems like almost everyone is a suspect now.  There are…. CCTV cameras per person in the UK…if we are being observed, can’t we do some observing ourselves?”

cameralovinproperdesatredOn Saturday 23rd January at 12pm over 2000 photographers gathered in Trafalgar Square to challenge Section 44 of the Terrorism Act 2000, buy which allows police increasing powers to stop and search photographers.  The demonstration was organized by the group I’m a Photographer, Not A Terrorist via facebook and twitter.  Armed with a borrowed compact piece of shite and hardly able to call myself a photographer, I went to investigate.  My subsequent two hours of extreme camera-envy were balanced out by a lively demo with a huge turn-out and serious civil liberties message.
crowd1placardscroppedcrowd
“We must work together now to stop this before photography becomes a part of history rather than a way of recording it” states PHNAT’s website.  The arrests of high-profile photographers arrested under section 44 have contributed to the immediacy of the message. But while the Met’s website gives a very measured description of police powers to intervene in media-related activity, many photographers complain that these powers are frequently abused, and the law and photographers’ rights are very unclear. 2suspectreport

Winding its way through the centre of the crowd, a ‘Vigilance Committee’, closely protected by a man on stilts in a helmet/balaclava/CCTV strapped-to-head ensemble (we should surely all take a leaf out of his fashion bible), arrested random, unsuspecting photographers in a stop and search parody. 
marrtile2
arresttile copy
As soon as the stop-and-search ‘guilt certificate’ they used (below) was complete, they declared their suspects guilty and provided them with two penalty options: six years forced labour or life-time contributor to the Vigilance Committee.  Most chose six years’ forced labour.
guiltcertificate

One photographer told me at the end of the demo ‘ our hope is that by organizing this demonstration we’ll make the police re-think their strategies.  The freedom to record and document history is a really important one, and a lot of press photographers are experiencing increasing difficulty with the police’. 

interview3

Magda, a photography student from Poland told me: ‘I’m just here because I want to make the point that just because you have a camera, it doesn’t make you a terrorist or a criminal.  I heard about this on facebook but I didn’t expect to find so many people!  I’m tired of being treated suspiciously when I take photos at demonstrations for example, at times and places where it’s really important to accurately record what’s going on, and my boyfriend, who works for a magazine here, has been stopped by the police quite a few times.  I’m not against anti-terrorism measures, but it seems like almost everyone is a suspect now.  There are…. CCTV cameras per person in the UK…if we are being observed, can’t we do some observing ourselves?”
notacrime

cameralovinproperdesatredOn Saturday 23rd January at 12pm over 2000 photographers gathered in Trafalgar Square to challenge Section 44 of the Terrorism Act 2000, generic which allows police increasing powers to stop and search photographers.  The demonstration was organized by the group I’m a Photographer, Not A Terrorist via facebook and twitter.  Armed with a borrowed compact piece of shite and hardly able to call myself a photographer, I went to investigate.  My subsequent two hours of extreme camera-envy were balanced out by a lively demo with a huge turn-out and serious civil liberties message.
crowd1placardscroppedcrowd
“We must work together now to stop this before photography becomes a part of history rather than a way of recording it” states PHNAT’s website.  The arrests of high-profile photographers arrested under section 44 have contributed to the immediacy of the message. But while the Met’s website gives a very measured description of police powers to intervene in media-related activity, many photographers complain that these powers are frequently abused, and the law and photographers’ rights are very unclear. 2suspectreport

Winding its way through the centre of the crowd, a ‘Vigilance Committee’, closely protected by a man on stilts in a helmet/balaclava/CCTV strapped-to-head ensemble (we should surely all take a leaf out of his fashion bible), arrested random, unsuspecting photographers in a stop and search parody. 
marrtile2
arresttile copy
As soon as the stop-and-search ‘guilt certificate’ they used (below) was complete, they declared their suspects guilty and provided them with two penalty options: six years forced labour or life-time contributor to the Vigilance Committee.  Most chose six years’ forced labour.
guiltcertificate

One photographer told me at the end of the demo ‘ our hope is that by organizing this demonstration we’ll make the police re-think their strategies.  The freedom to record and document history is a really important one, and a lot of press photographers are experiencing increasing difficulty with the police’. 

interview3

Magda, a photography student from Poland told me: ‘I’m just here because I want to make the point that just because you have a camera, it doesn’t make you a terrorist or a criminal.  I heard about this on facebook but I didn’t expect to find so many people!  I’m tired of being treated suspiciously when I take photos at demonstrations for example, at times and places where it’s really important to accurately record what’s going on, and my boyfriend, who works for a magazine here, has been stopped by the police quite a few times.  I’m not against anti-terrorism measures, but it seems like almost everyone is a suspect now.  There are…. CCTV cameras per person in the UK…if we are being observed, can’t we do some observing ourselves?”
notacrime

cameralovinproperdesatredOn Saturday 23rd January at 12pm over 2000 photographers gathered in Trafalgar Square to challenge Section 44 of the Terrorism Act 2000, price which allows police increasing powers to stop and search photographers.  The demonstration was organized by the group I’m a Photographer, click Not A Terrorist via facebook and twitter.  Armed with a borrowed compact piece of shite and hardly able to call myself a photographer, I went to investigate.  My subsequent two hours of extreme camera-envy were balanced out by a lively demo with a huge turn-out and serious civil liberties message.
crowd1placardscroppedcrowd
“We must work together now to stop this before photography becomes a part of history rather than a way of recording it” states PHNAT’s website.  The arrests of high-profile photographers arrested under section 44 have contributed to the immediacy of the message. But while the Met’s website gives a very measured description of police powers to intervene in media-related activity, many photographers complain that these powers are frequently abused, and the law and photographers’ rights are very unclear. 2suspectreport

Winding its way through the centre of the crowd, a ‘Vigilance Committee’, closely protected by a man on stilts in a helmet/balaclava/CCTV strapped-to-head ensemble (we should surely all take a leaf out of his fashion bible), arrested random, unsuspecting photographers in a stop and search parody. 
marrtile2
arresttile copy
As soon as the stop-and-search ‘guilt certificate’ they used (below) was complete, they declared their suspects guilty and provided them with two penalty options: six years forced labour or life-time contributor to the Vigilance Committee.  Most chose six years’ forced labour.

Class: None, Sexual Orientation: Rarely
guiltcertificate

One photographer told me at the end of the demo ‘ our hope is that by organizing this demonstration we’ll make the police re-think their strategies.  The freedom to record and document history is a really important one, and a lot of press photographers are experiencing increasing difficulty with the police’. 

interview3Photographer David Hoffman is interviewed after the demo

Magda, a photography student from Poland told me: ‘I’m just here because I want to make the point that just because you have a camera, it doesn’t make you a terrorist or a criminal.  I heard about this on facebook but I didn’t expect to find so many people!  I’m tired of being treated suspiciously when I take photos at demonstrations for example, at times and places where it’s really important to accurately record what’s going on, and my boyfriend, who works for a magazine here, has been stopped by the police quite a few times.  I’m not against anti-terrorism measures, but it seems like almost everyone is a suspect now.  There are…. CCTV cameras per person in the UK…if we are being observed, can’t we do some observing ourselves?”
notacrime
Little Glass Clementine cottongold                 
Images throughout courtesy of Little Glass clementine.

The jewellery designer Little Glass Clementine is enough to melt the heart of any eco-conscious fashionista, check the innocence in its name alone summarising the beauty of the designs– jewellery with soul. The ethos for these designs is simple; naturally sourced materials used to maximum effect to create intricate necklaces and exquisite hair pieces. The brainchild behind this brand that can regress even the most mature person to ‘oohing’ and ‘aahing’ in child-like wonder, adiposity is Clementine James, more about or Clemmie. Many Amelia’s readers will recognise Clementine from the earth section of our magazine as she was interviewed last year about her time spent in the remote location of Tuvalu in the South Pacific. A self taught jeweller Clementine has been skilfully making and selling her creations since the tender age of 16. Her aim is to tell a story with recycled materials stumbled upon to create something new by transforming the old so memories can live on.

Little Glass Clementine

Clemmie describes her sourced materials through a set of findings: “A ring from a love affair, a pebble from a Scottish shore, a button from a grandmother’s box, gems from India, a single earring, jewels from a charity shop, junk from a boot fair, lace from an antique market, fabric from an old coat, and pearls from the sea.” These individual items work together to create the ultimate in reclaimed possessions, and comprise the perfect accessories to make even the most ordinary outfit look both unique and interesting.

Little Glass Clementine golden park

Clementine has exhibited in galleries and boutiques in both London and Edinburgh and has sold in a plethora of shops, markets and even Brighton beach! For me the best thing about the designs in the brands back catalogue is the inspiration they can ignite for others. Whether it’s the urge to buy a Little Glass Clementine necklace, to revisit old memories or to get crafty with the pliers, there’s something about Clementine James that can make anyone feel inclined to be creative and eco-friendly.
NYPC

Back in 2007, purchase the five piece New Young Pony Club (or NYPC), website spearheaded by the captivating Tahita Bulmer, were causing quite the ruckus. Their style of post punk, new wave, indie-electro pop, heard in their debut album Fantastic Playroom, quickly became the go- to sound for all the cool kids around town. With acts like CSS, LadyHawke, and The Ting Tings picking up where NYPC left off, it’s obvious that they need to return with a couple of hard hitters to assure us of their place in the market. If the first release off their new album The Optimist is anything to go by, then they don’t have to worry about being M.I.A for the past few years.

nypc_press_shot_2_dean_chalkley

Lost A Girl is a strong, self assured anthem that shows that NYPC don’t miss a trick. Over an early 80′s electro beat, Taihita sings like she’s the love child of Souxsie Soux and The Cure’s Robert Smith. Wearing her heart on her sleeve, but with a head turning defiance, she picks apart a relationship that seems like it’s dead in the water and doing nothing for her. “I’m making you smile, why am I doing that?” she asks. As the chorus breaks into “la la la la,looks like you’ve lost a girl”, the statement sounds more of a taunt than a lament, directed to who ever was not good enough to keep her attention.

NYPC are smart enough to revisit the music scene with a track full of catchy hooks and hard edged melodies. It doesn’t reinvent the wheel, but it reminds us of their much valued place in the British music scene. Welcome back!

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