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Top 25 Art Blog - Creative Tourist

An Interview with Edward Vince

Stop the presses, you are about to read a non fashion week related post! Ed Vince discusses his upcoming exhibition as part of PayneShurvell's 4x4, the third in their month long series of four day exhibitions

Written by Sally Mumby-Croft

Monday saw the fourth day dawn on London Fashion Week and delightfully my first day of intriguing ethical fashion presentations. First up on No. 1 Greek Street was the delightful Lu Flux, there visit web followed in the afternoon by – congratulations! – the Ethical Fashion Forum’s Innovation Award winner Ada Zanditon. -

In the run up to London Fashion Week, more about Katie Antoniou interviewed Ada Zanditon about the trials, malady tribulations and positive rewards of producing innovative ethical fashion. Often the problem lies in the assumption that ethical fashion is boring and unfashionable – that most heinous of sins! – a situation being speedily rectified with the continuing presence of Estethica’s exhibition and support of young designers exploring the possibility of sustainable fashion at London Fashion Week Exhibition.

Starting at 2pm, Ada Zanditon’s presentation – which in the grand scheme of things was more of catwalk – displayed the designer’s incredible 3D textiles used to embellish the collection of pretty dresses. Utilising her presence at On|Off, Ada showcased the delectability of clothes made through using up-cycled materials. The outcome of which had the group of ladies behind me swooning.

Christopher Raeburn and Lu Flux, (whose review will be appearing later on today…) are but two of Ada Zanditon’s trailblazing contemporaries in the field of ethical fashion. All three designers are successfully proving there need be no distinction between ‘fashion’ and ‘ethical fashion.’

Surely it is time for all designers to take the ethics of their production lines into consideration: namely where the fabrics originate and who is physically making the clothes for commercial consumption.

When answering Amelia’s Magazine’s final question , Zanditon touched upon the difficult reality of encouraging people to achieve not only sustainable fashion, but sustainable lives; “I only think the planet can truly convince people of the importance of sustainability. I’m sure most people living on the coast of Bangladesh are highly convinced that we need to live in a more sustainable way as they are effected daily by climate change.”

A common fault in humanities mentality is our failure to project successfully beyond today, nurtured as we are on natural resources being infinite. It is incredibly hard to convince worldwide populations’ materials are and will become finite, whilst items still appear in their thousands on shop floors. Perhaps it will take empty shelves to convince us of the perils of fast fashion.

Intriguingly Ada Zanditon uses geometric cutting to produce zero waste. Tell us how you do it Ada!

Monday saw the fourth day dawn on London Fashion Week and delightfully my first day of intriguing ethical fashion presentations. First up on No. 1 Greek Street was the delightful Lu Flux, visit this followed in the afternoon by – congratulations! – the Ethical Fashion Forum’s Innovation Award winner Ada Zanditon. -

In the run up to London Fashion Week, decease Katie Antoniou interviewed Ada Zanditon about the trials, for sale tribulations and positive rewards of producing innovative ethical fashion. Often the problem lies in the assumption that ethical fashion is boring and unfashionable – that most heinous of sins! – a situation being speedily rectified with the continuing presence of Estethica’s exhibition and support of young designers exploring the possibility of sustainable fashion at London Fashion Week Exhibition.

Starting at 2pm, Ada Zanditon’s presentation – which in the grand scheme of things was more of catwalk – displayed the designer’s incredible 3D textiles used to embellish the collection of pretty dresses. Utilising her presence at On|Off, Ada showcased the delectability of clothes made through using up-cycled materials. The outcome of which had the group of ladies behind me swooning.

Christopher Raeburn and Lu Flux, (whose review will be appearing later on today…) are but two of Ada Zanditon’s trailblazing contemporaries in the field of ethical fashion. All three designers are successfully proving there need be no distinction between ‘fashion’ and ‘ethical fashion.’

Surely it is time for all designers to take the ethics of their production lines into consideration: namely where the fabrics originate and who is physically making the clothes for commercial consumption.

When answering Amelia’s Magazine’s final question , Zanditon touched upon the difficult reality of encouraging people to achieve not only sustainable fashion, but sustainable lives; “I only think the planet can truly convince people of the importance of sustainability. I’m sure most people living on the coast of Bangladesh are highly convinced that we need to live in a more sustainable way as they are effected daily by climate change.”

A common fault in humanities mentality is our failure to project successfully beyond today, nurtured as we are on natural resources being infinite. It is incredibly hard to convince worldwide populations’ materials are and will become finite, whilst items still appear in their thousands on shop floors. Perhaps it will take empty shelves to convince us of the perils of fast fashion.

Intriguingly Ada Zanditon uses geometric cutting to produce zero waste. Tell us how you do it Ada!

Illustration by Kellie Black

The Headonsim exhibition is hidden in the Embankment Galleries on the lower ground floor of Somerset house, doctor behind the BFC tent. I’ve been down there twice, store once on Thursday and once yesterday – and both times it seemed very under attended. Actually, side effects all the exhibitions around the scrum of the registration area seem very quiet but they are all well worth a look, even if it is just to take a closer look at some of the collections as I did upstairs for Louise Amstrup.

Curated by milliner extraordinaire Stephen Jones, the Headonism exhibition is all about the hats and is the only section of London Fashion Week to do so. There are only five exhibitors: J Smith, Little Shilpa, Noel Stewart, Piers Atkinson and Soren Bach, but the difference between the stands is remarkable. The xxxxx has no one manning it, nor does Little Shilpa – merely a book to leave details in and the only exhibitor to have put any real effort into their display is Piers Atkinson but more on him later. The importance of showcasing your wares appropriately at London Fashion Week is shockingly something that many have left to the last minute. Read Katie Antoniou’s post on all the exhibitions to find out who did it well.

We were lucky enough to interview two of the exhibitors prior to the show, the first was J Smith Esquire. His exhibit is immediately to your right as you enter the exhibition, displaying his most recent foray into the high street market with a Mister Smith display of flat pack hats in colourful cut out leather. He told us about the collection: ‘Mister Smith is designed to be robust, accessible, affordable millinery with high design values, so everyone can have a J Smith Esquire hat’.

Photograph by Florence Massey

Illustration of J Smith Esquire by Kellie Black

Mixing together the ready-to-wear and couture, J Smiths talent shines with his main collections. Illuminated promises to be VERY eclectic, ‘(it’s) inspired by vintage Italian fashion papers to create a modern-day Edwardian couture, and yes, expect a very colourful collection!’

Illustration of Little Shilpa by Yelena Bryksenkova

Little Shilpa’s stand is on each side as you exit the exhibition space, and displays an array of great headpieces, necklaces and hats. Her work is crazy, but in a good way. His designs are definitely not for the wallflowers among us, something crystalised by his naming Bjork as the dream candidate for one of his creations!

With an Indian heritage it is unsurprising to hear that the inspiration for his Headonism show picks up on this , ‘the pieces were inspired from Bombay and London, there was an obvious juxtaposition of the 2 cities …all the pieces were specially created for Headonism as it was my first formal showing in London hence a sort of introduction to my inspirations ‘.

Little Shilpa totally agreed with Piers Atkinson’s comment that millinery finally becomes more about having fun rather than the obligatory weddings and funerals, ‘working out of India it has always been about fun and design’. Long may that continue!

Talking of Piers Atkinson and the move away from wedding/funeral hats his stand is fantastic. More of an exploded flower stall mixed with Hollywood clichés and mini people, I spent a-g-e-s peering at every single one of his creations. With lots of green felt, and miniature people Atkinson definitely taps into the fun side of millinery and his collection is so good: silly, energetic and vibrant. Spilling with colours and quirks, the Hollywood sign features heavily, as do clashing flowers and little gold spikes. If you want a break from the oh so serious fashion upstairs at BFC, pop down to Atkinson’s stand for a giggle.

Illustration by Kellie Black

Monday saw the fourth day dawn on London Fashion Week and delightfully my first day of intriguing ethical fashion presentations. First up on No. 1 Greek Street was the delightful Lu Flux, adiposity followed in the afternoon by – congratulations! – the Ethical Fashion Forum’s Innovation Award winner Ada Zanditon. -

In the run up to London Fashion Week, click Katie Antoniou interviewed Ada Zanditon about the trials, pill tribulations and positive rewards of producing innovative ethical fashion. Often the problem lies in the assumption that ethical fashion is boring and unfashionable – that most heinous of sins! – a situation being speedily rectified with the continuing presence of Estethica’s exhibition and support of young designers exploring the possibility of sustainable fashion at London Fashion Week Exhibition.

Starting at 2pm, Ada Zanditon’s presentation – which in the grand scheme of things was more of catwalk – displayed the designer’s incredible 3D textiles used to embellish the collection of pretty dresses. Utilising her presence at On|Off, Ada showcased the delectability of clothes made through using up-cycled materials. The outcome of which had the group of ladies behind me swooning.

Christopher Raeburn and Lu Flux, (whose review will be appearing later on today…) are but two of Ada Zanditon’s trailblazing contemporaries in the field of ethical fashion. All three designers are successfully proving there need be no distinction between ‘fashion’ and ‘ethical fashion.’

Surely it is time for all designers to take the ethics of their production lines into consideration: namely where the fabrics originate and who is physically making the clothes for commercial consumption.

When answering Amelia’s Magazine’s final question , Zanditon touched upon the difficult reality of encouraging people to achieve not only sustainable fashion, but sustainable lives; “I only think the planet can truly convince people of the importance of sustainability. I’m sure most people living on the coast of Bangladesh are highly convinced that we need to live in a more sustainable way as they are effected daily by climate change.”

A common fault in humanities mentality is our failure to project successfully beyond today, nurtured as we are on natural resources being infinite. It is incredibly hard to convince worldwide populations’ materials are and will become finite, whilst items still appear in their thousands on shop floors. Perhaps it will take empty shelves to convince us of the perils of fast fashion.

Intriguingly Ada Zanditon uses geometric cutting to produce zero waste. Tell us how you do it Ada!

Monday saw the fourth day dawn on London Fashion Week and delightfully my first day of intriguing ethical fashion presentations. First up on No. 1 Greek Street was the delightful Lu Flux, page followed in the afternoon by – congratulations! – the Ethical Fashion Forum’s Innovation Award winner Ada Zanditon. -

In the run up to London Fashion Week, Katie Antoniou interviewed Ada Zanditon about the trials, tribulations and positive rewards of producing innovative ethical fashion. Often the problem lies in the assumption that ethical fashion is boring and unfashionable – that most heinous of sins! – a situation being speedily rectified with the continuing presence of Estethica’s exhibition and support of young designers exploring the possibility of sustainable fashion at London Fashion Week Exhibition.

Starting at 2pm, Ada Zanditon’s presentation – which in the grand scheme of things was more of catwalk – displayed the designer’s incredible 3D textiles used to embellish the collection of pretty dresses. Utilising her presence at On|Off, Ada showcased the delectability of clothes made through using up-cycled materials. The outcome of which had the group of ladies behind me swooning.

Christopher Raeburn and Lu Flux, (whose review will be appearing later on today…) are but two of Ada Zanditon’s trailblazing contemporaries in the field of ethical fashion. All three designers are successfully proving there need be no distinction between ‘fashion’ and ‘ethical fashion.’

Surely it is time for all designers to take the ethics of their production lines into consideration: namely where the fabrics originate and who is physically making the clothes for commercial consumption.

When answering Amelia’s Magazine’s final question , Zanditon touched upon the difficult reality of encouraging people to achieve not only sustainable fashion, but sustainable lives; “I only think the planet can truly convince people of the importance of sustainability. I’m sure most people living on the coast of Bangladesh are highly convinced that we need to live in a more sustainable way as they are effected daily by climate change.”

A common fault in humanities mentality is our failure to project successfully beyond today, nurtured as we are on natural resources being infinite. It is incredibly hard to convince worldwide populations’ materials are and will become finite, whilst items still appear in their thousands on shop floors. Perhaps it will take empty shelves to convince us of the perils of fast fashion.

Intriguingly Ada Zanditon uses geometric cutting to produce zero waste. Tell us how you do it Ada!

Illustrations by Paolo Caravello

Monday saw the fourth day dawn on London Fashion Week and delightfully my first day of intriguing ethical fashion presentations. First up on No. 1 Greek Street was the delightful Lu Flux, drug followed in the afternoon by – congratulations! – the Ethical Fashion Forum’s Innovation Award winner Ada Zanditon. -

In the run up to London Fashion Week, stuff Katie Antoniou interviewed Ada Zanditon about the trials, tribulations and positive rewards of producing innovative ethical fashion. Often the problem lies in the assumption that ethical fashion is boring and unfashionable – that most heinous of sins! – a situation being speedily rectified with the continuing presence of Estethica’s exhibition and support of young designers exploring the possibility of sustainable fashion at London Fashion Week Exhibition.

Illustrations by Paolo Caravello

Starting at 2pm, Ada Zanditon’s presentation – which in the grand scheme of things was more of catwalk – displayed the designer’s incredible 3D textiles used to embellish the collection of pretty dresses. Utilising her presence at On|Off, Ada showcased the delectability of clothes made through using up-cycled materials. The outcome of which had the group of ladies behind me swooning.

Christopher Raeburn and Lu Flux, (whose review will be appearing later on today…) are but two of Ada Zanditon’s trailblazing contemporaries in the field of ethical fashion. All three designers are successfully proving there need be no distinction between ‘fashion’ and ‘ethical fashion.’

Surely it is time for all designers to take the ethics of their production lines into consideration: namely where the fabrics originate and who is physically making the clothes for commercial consumption.

Illustrations by Paolo Caravello

When answering Amelia’s Magazine’s final question , Zanditon touched upon the difficult reality of encouraging people to achieve not only sustainable fashion, but sustainable lives; “I only think the planet can truly convince people of the importance of sustainability. I’m sure most people living on the coast of Bangladesh are highly convinced that we need to live in a more sustainable way as they are effected daily by climate change.”

A common fault in humanities mentality is our failure to project successfully beyond today, nurtured as we are on natural resources being infinite. It is incredibly hard to convince worldwide populations’ materials are and will become finite, whilst items still appear in their thousands on shop floors. Perhaps it will take empty shelves to convince us of the perils of fast fashion.

Intriguingly Ada Zanditon uses geometric cutting to produce zero waste. Tell us how you do it Ada!

Illustrations by Paolo Caravello

Monday saw the fourth day dawn on London Fashion Week and delightfully my first day of intriguing ethical fashion presentations. First up on No. 1 Greek Street was the delightful Lu Flux, visit followed in the afternoon by – congratulations! – the Ethical Fashion Forum’s Innovation Award winner Ada Zanditon. -

All photographs by Sally Mumby-Croft

In the run up to London Fashion Week, order Katie Antoniou interviewed Ada Zanditon about the trials, tribulations and positive rewards of producing innovative ethical fashion. Often the problem lies in the assumption that ethical fashion is boring and unfashionable – that most heinous of sins! – a situation being speedily rectified with the continuing presence of Estethica’s exhibition and support of young designers exploring the possibility of sustainable fashion at London Fashion Week Exhibition.

Illustrations by Paolo Caravello

Starting at 2pm, Ada Zanditon’s presentation – which in the grand scheme of things was more of catwalk – displayed the designer’s incredible 3D textiles used to embellish the collection of pretty dresses. Utilising her presence at On|Off, Ada showcased the delectability of clothes made through using up-cycled materials. The outcome of which had the group of ladies behind me swooning.

Christopher Raeburn and Lu Flux, (whose review will be appearing later on today…) are but two of Ada Zanditon’s trailblazing contemporaries in the field of ethical fashion. All three designers are successfully proving there need be no distinction between ‘fashion’ and ‘ethical fashion.’

Surely it is time for all designers to take the ethics of their production lines into consideration: namely where the fabrics originate and who is physically making the clothes for commercial consumption.

Illustrations by Paolo Caravello

When answering Amelia’s Magazine’s final question , Zanditon touched upon the difficult reality of encouraging people to achieve not only sustainable fashion, but sustainable lives; “I only think the planet can truly convince people of the importance of sustainability. I’m sure most people living on the coast of Bangladesh are highly convinced that we need to live in a more sustainable way as they are effected daily by climate change.”

A common fault in humanities mentality is our failure to project successfully beyond today, nurtured as we are on natural resources being infinite. It is incredibly hard to convince worldwide populations’ materials are and will become finite, whilst items still appear in their thousands on shop floors. Perhaps it will take empty shelves to convince us of the perils of fast fashion.

Intriguingly Ada Zanditon uses geometric cutting to produce zero waste. Tell us how you do it Ada!

Illustration by Kellie Black

The Headonsim exhibition is hidden in the Embankment Galleries on the lower ground floor of Somerset house, order behind the BFC tent. I’ve been down there twice, order once on Thursday and once yesterday – and both times it seemed very under attended. Actually, all the exhibitions around the scrum of the registration area seem very quiet but they are all well worth a look, even if it is just to take a closer look at some of the collections as I did upstairs for Louise Amstrup.

Curated by milliner extraordinaire Stephen Jones, the Headonism exhibition is all about the hats and is the only section of London Fashion Week to do so. There are only five exhibitors: J Smith, Little Shilpa, Noel Stewart, Piers Atkinson and Soren Bach, but the difference between the stands is remarkable. The xxxxx has no one manning it, nor does Little Shilpa – merely a book to leave details in and the only exhibitor to have put any real effort into their display is Piers Atkinson but more on him later. The importance of showcasing your wares appropriately at London Fashion Week is shockingly something that many have left to the last minute. Read Katie Antoniou’s post on all the exhibitions to find out who did it well.

Illustration of J Smith Esquire by Kellie Black

We were lucky enough to interview two of the exhibitors prior to the show, the first was J Smith Esquire. His exhibit is immediately to your right as you enter the exhibition, displaying his most recent foray into the high street market with a Mister Smith display of flat pack hats in colourful cut out leather. He told us about the collection: ‘Mister Smith is designed to be robust, accessible, affordable millinery with high design values, so everyone can have a J Smith Esquire hat’.

Photograph by Florence Massey

Mixing together the ready-to-wear and couture, J Smiths talent shines with his main collections. Illuminated promises to be VERY eclectic, ‘(it’s) inspired by vintage Italian fashion papers to create a modern-day Edwardian couture, and yes, expect a very colourful collection!’

Illustration of Little Shilpa by Yelena Bryksenkova

Little Shilpa’s stand is on each side as you exit the exhibition space, and displays an array of great headpieces, necklaces and hats. Her work is crazy, but in a good way. His designs are definitely not for the wallflowers among us, something crystalised by his naming Bjork as the dream candidate for one of his creations!

With an Indian heritage it is unsurprising to hear that the inspiration for his Headonism show picks up on this , ‘the pieces were inspired from Bombay and London, there was an obvious juxtaposition of the 2 cities …all the pieces were specially created for Headonism as it was my first formal showing in London hence a sort of introduction to my inspirations ‘.

Little Shilpa totally agreed with Piers Atkinson’s comment that millinery finally becomes more about having fun rather than the obligatory weddings and funerals, ‘working out of India it has always been about fun and design’. Long may that continue!

Talking of Piers Atkinson and the move away from wedding/funeral hats his stand is fantastic. More of an exploded flower stall mixed with Hollywood clichés and mini people, I spent a-g-e-s peering at every single one of his creations. With lots of green felt, and miniature people Atkinson definitely taps into the fun side of millinery and his collection is so good: silly, energetic and vibrant. Spilling with colours and quirks, the Hollywood sign features heavily, as do clashing flowers and little gold spikes. If you want a break from the oh so serious fashion upstairs at BFC, pop down to Atkinson’s stand for a giggle.

Illustration by Kellie Black

Photograph of Piers Atkinson by Florence Massey

Illustration of Piers Atkinson Kellie Black

The Headonsim exhibition is hidden in the Embankment Galleries on the lower ground floor of Somerset house, sildenafil behind the BFC tent. I’ve been down there twice, buy once on Thursday and once yesterday – and both times it seemed very under attended. Actually, all the exhibitions around the scrum of the registration area seem very quiet but they are all well worth a look, even if it is just to take a closer look at some of the collections as I did upstairs for Louise Amstrup.

Curated by milliner extraordinaire Stephen Jones, the Headonism exhibition is all about the hats and is the only section of London Fashion Week to do so. There are only five exhibitors: J Smith, Little Shilpa, Noel Stewart, Piers Atkinson and Soren Bach, but the difference between the stands is remarkable. The xxxxx has no one manning it, nor does Little Shilpa – merely a book to leave details in and the only exhibitor to have put any real effort into their display is Piers Atkinson but more on him later. The importance of showcasing your wares appropriately at London Fashion Week is shockingly something that many have left to the last minute. Read Katie Antoniou’s post on all the exhibitions to find out who did it well.

Illustration of J Smith Esquire by Kellie Black

We were lucky enough to interview two of the exhibitors prior to the show, the first was J Smith Esquire. His exhibit is immediately to your right as you enter the exhibition, displaying his most recent foray into the high street market with a Mister Smith display of flat pack hats in colourful cut out leather. He told us about the collection: ‘Mister Smith is designed to be robust, accessible, affordable millinery with high design values, so everyone can have a J Smith Esquire hat’.

Photograph from Mister Smith collection by Florence Massey

Mixing together the ready-to-wear and couture, J Smiths talent shines with his main collections, the most recent entitled ‘Illuminated’ is sure to be as highly impressive as his previous efforts. The new collection promises to be VERY eclectic, ‘(it’s) inspired by vintage Italian fashion papers to create a modern-day Edwardian couture, and yes, expect a very colourful collection!’

Illustration of Little Shilpa by Yelena Bryksenkova

Little Shilpa’s stand is on each side as you exit the exhibition space, and displays an array of great headpieces, necklaces and hats. His work is crazy, but in a good way. The designs are definitely not for the wallflowers among us, something crystalised by his naming Bjork as a dream customer!

With an Indian heritage it is unsurprising to hear that the inspiration for his Headonism show picks up on this , ‘the pieces were inspired from Bombay and London, there was an obvious juxtaposition of the 2 cities …all the pieces were specially created for Headonism as it was my first formal showing in London hence a sort of introduction to my inspirations’.

Photograph of J Shilpa by Florence Massey

Little Shilpa agrees with Piers Atkinson’s very true comment that millinery has finally become more about having fun rather than the obligatory weddings and funerals, ‘working out of India it has always been about fun and design’. Long may that continue!

Talking of Piers Atkinson and the move away from wedding/funeral hats his stand is fantastic. More of an exploded flower stall mixed with Hollywood clichés and mini people, I spent a-g-e-s peering at every single one of his creations. With lots of green felt, and miniature people Atkinson definitely taps into the fun side of millinery and his collection is so good: silly, energetic and vibrant. Spilling with colours and quirks, the Hollywood sign features heavily, as do clashing flowers and little gold spikes. If you want a break from the oh so serious fashion upstairs at BFC, pop down to Atkinson’s stand for a giggle.

Illustration of Piers Atkinson by Kellie Black

Photograph of Piers Atkinson by Florence Massey

At a mere 20 years of age, health Louisiana native and child of a Muscle Shoals session musician, Dylan LeBlanc is wise beyond his years. His debut album, Paupers Fields, came out in August on Rough Trade Records, and has all the hallmarks of becoming a classic addition to the rich Americana and country music tradition of his home state. Growing up between Shreveport, Louisiana and Muscle Shoals, Alabama, LeBlanc has battled a fair few demons in his short life, culminating in a stint in rehab in his late teens. Amelia’s Magazine met up with the soft- spoken southerner to discuss music, booze and the weather.

So your album, Paupers Field, has been out for a month now and has been getting some impressive reviews both sides of the Atlantic. Do you feel good about the record?
It feels good. I try not to read a lot of them. I don’t want to see.

You have been compared to the likes of Neil Young and Ryan Adams – how does that feel as an artist to be compared to such greats?
I guess it’s just a media reference point, you know. That’s how they reference things, but I personally don’t think that I’m a Neil Young…there’s only one Neil Young.

The storytelling in your songs could be comparable to that of Young…
Yeah, I definitely like Neil Young…maybe I do sound a bit like Ryan Adams…I just think that everybody has their own originality and I wish people would try to find that instead of trying to find other things to write about…but those people don’t write songs and they don’t make music, so they don’t understand.

Growing up with the musical heritage that you have had, with your dad being one of the Muscle Shoals session musicians and a songwriter in his own right, plus growing up in a part of the states that has such a rich history of country and Americana music, did you feel that you had an added pressure to live up to a certain level of expectation?
No, I think that you have to stay true to yourself, that’s the most important thing. Just do what you like to do, no matter what…no matter what people think or say or do because everybody is going to try to knock you down a notch or two, you know. It happens and you have to take that as much as the nice things that people have to say.

What sort of advice did your dad give you, as a musician?
When I was real young I spent most of my time with my grandmother [in Shreveport] while he was doing his thing in Muscle Shoals…he would just tell me to write [music] all the time. My Grandmother had all kinds of good records and she listened to really good music, as opposed to my father who was just trying to get hits on the radio, which is understandable, but he likes really good music too.

What sort of music was your grandmother into?
Neil Young. She liked good music. She liked John Prine a lot. My grandfather used to sing and he had an old classical Gibson that he used to play and she would to make him learn songs in a songbook, and he would play it to her in the kitchen while she was cooking.

What music did you discover yourself when you were growing up?
I love Led Zeppelin, they’re one of my favourite artists ever. I think that they are amazing songwriters. The Doors too. I used to listen to a lot of old classic rock.

Did you ever feel like rebelling against your family’s musical tradition and getting heavily into techno or metal, for example?
I played straight up rock and roll for a long time and I played in cover bands and stuff like that. I loved anything but country music but then I always had a secret love for old country music like Hank Williams, Kitty Wells and stuff like that. If you listen to those old records they are just as much art as The Beatles, you know what I mean? If you listen to Waylon Jennings or old Kitty Wells records, the way that they’re laid out plus they’re all cut live…there’s such a wonderful reverb on the vocals, you know…it’s old.

Is that how you recorded Paupers Field?
Yeah, most of it. The basic tracks are all live – the pedal steel, and stuff. I did re-sing two songs that weren’t live where I went back and re sang them later but we weren’t sure if I was going to be able to do that because it was cut live and there was a lot of bleed into the microphones from other instruments. That’s why we had to mix this record the way we did. We had to really fix the bleeding of sounds and spots and stuff.

Do you enjoy the recording process? (Paupers Field is self produced)
I love it. I like producing. I like making beautiful music, you know? Something to listen to. I have a wild imagination and I daydream a lot. Often my manager gets upset with me because he’ll try and talk to me about things and I’m in a other world and didn’t catch anything he just said.

That comes across in your lyrics too – there is a storytelling element there…
I remember being real young and in school and I had a really bad case of attention deficit disorder…but I just try to focus on writing a song and finally I’ll get it…it comes from spending a lot of time by myself, you know, and learning about the type of person I am and the type of artist I wanted to be. What I really loved is forgetting everything that other people wanted me to do and just doing what I wanted to do, which was to make music like I am making right now.

So you’re happy with how the album has turned out….
Yeah, I’m really happy with it – I think that it’s who I am as a person and that’s the most honest thing I have ever done. I’ve been a very dishonest person throughout my life and done some terrible things.

One thing that is so compelling about the record is that is it very confessional lyrically. You seem to have an emotional maturity beyond your years…

I think I have put myself through a lot of things to mature myself. I put myself through hell. I mean, I do it everyday. I drink too much.

Do you think that’s a prerequisite to writing good rock and roll or country music?

I don’t think it helps one lick. I think I just enjoy it.

Do you find it’s easier to write songs when you’re sad or troubled?
I figure that that’s when people are most honest because it’s the things they can’t say to people outright, but they can say it in a song. Because nobody really cares about how you feel, you know? People just go about their day and say ‘I’m sorry, I feel bad for you’ or whatever.

The people you write about in your songs, are they real people?
No, not really. I grew up in a weird situation so I would find these ways to escape. It sounds real schizophrenic and I feel ashamed even talking about it, but it was my way of escaping and I knew that I could always go to a different place [in his mind], close my eyes and breathe again, you know what I mean? And that’s a lot of how I go about songwriting. When things get really bad, I leave – I always run…get in my car and just drive.

Are you happier on your own? Do you find solace in solitude?
At first it was really hard. I felt like an old man but now I’m used to it. I get used to being on my own and doing my own thing. It feels bad sometimes – I think I have anger issues. It’s sometimes so hard for me to be around people sometimes because I feel bad for being there. I wonder if they’re mad or angry at me and I worry too much about those things. I worry about hurting other people – I don’t want to do that but I’m so terribly good at it. I just want to be kind. I want to be a good man.

Paupers Field feels like a very personal record…
Now I’m starting to think that it’s a little too personal. It might have been a little too personal to put out to the general public. I didn’t think it was going to get this much attention. What was yours is now everyone’s. That’s the bad part…there is nothing you can say anymore, you know, because you had the guts to put it out there…so there’s really not much you can defend yourself with after that ,when people want to say things about it.

So you’re playing a few live dates in the UK…
I played the End Of The Road Festival which really turned out well. I was really nervous, I almost panicked before I went out on stage because there was nobody out there before the show and I was, like, ‘Thank God’ but when I walked out there, the whole freaking crowd was, I dunno…there were so many people. I’ve never played to that may people in my whole life.

How did you feel when you came off stage?
It was a good thing, I was buzzing. I felt like I handled myself really well, I was really proud of myself.

So you enjoy playing live?
I love it. It’s one of my favourite things to do, especially when it’s really good. Particularly with our band, everyone’s a great musician but I like it to be really rough around the edges and then get it real tight again, so there are different nights, you know? We can have a totally insanely awesome night and then have one of those nights where it’s like ‘urrgh, we shouldn’t have even gone out there.’ [With the current band] we’ve been doing this for about 4 months but I’ve been playing with John, my drummer, since I was 15.

You’re also playing the 100 Club, one of the most historical venues in London…
Yeah, the Stones played there and Muddy Waters. I’m really excited – I hope the vibe is really good in there. I’m really excited to be here [in London]. It is the most beautiful place I believe I have ever been in my life. I love it here. I like the weather.

Really?? You can take it with you if you like…

I would if I could. It’s better than the 140 degree weather in Alabama. Its pretty hot.

What are you like on tour – are you all rock and roll excess or do you like to take it easy?
Well, the first night here in London I got really drunk. The people here are so kind and so sweet. In America I would have had my ass knocked out in five minutes – I would have been in a fight. Here people just thought ‘oh he’s just having a good time’ and you’re allowed, which I enjoyed. I totally made an ass out of myself – I was dancing and stuff, and I never do that. I think the alcohol content is higher over here…it was a great buzz – I’d been searching for that buzz for a really long time and when I finally found it I lost my mind. The energy was so good and we were all excited…I still am excited.

Do you write when you’re on tour?
I write short stories a lot, more than songs, believe it or not.

Do those stories sometimes turn into songs?
Yeah. I keep this huge [pile of] paper I take everywhere and I write aimlessly all the time. I love the southern Gothic writers, like Faulkner and Tennessee Williams, and I always wanted to be able to do that. I like to do it because it’s fun, but I’m no good at it…

What inspires you to write the most?
It’s almost a thing I get right in my heart. Like, if you looked at a woman or you looked at your mother who you haven’t seen in years that you missed a lot – that’s how it feels for me. It’s so satisfying and gratifying…just an uplifting thing to do. It just makes me feel like I’m useful and I don’t feel useful a lot of the time.

Paupers Field is a record that will connect with a lot of people and mean a lot to them, so that’s pretty useful…
I would love that, I would. I really hope people enjoy it.

Paupers Field is out now on Rough Trade Records.

Illustration of Piers Atkinson Kellie Black

The Headonism exhibition is hidden in the Embankment Galleries on the lower ground floor of Somerset house, sildenafil behind the BFC tent. I’ve been down there twice, page once on Thursday and once yesterday – and both times it seemed very under attended. Actually, page all the exhibitions around the scrum of the registration area seem very quiet but they are all well worth a look, even if it is just to take a closer look at some of the collections as I did upstairs for Louise Amstrup.

Curated by milliner extraordinaire Stephen Jones, the Headonism exhibition is all about the hats and is the only section of London Fashion Week to do so. There are only five exhibitors: J Smith, Little Shilpa, Noel Stewart, Piers Atkinson and Soren Bach, but the difference between the stands is remarkable. Disappointingly, the Soren Bach stand has no one manning it, nor does Little Shilpa – merely a book to leave details in.

The only exhibitor to have put any real effort into their display is Piers Atkinson…but more on him later. The importance of showcasing your wares appropriately at London Fashion Week is shockingly something that many have left to the last minute. Read Katie Antoniou’s post on all the exhibitions to find out who did it well.

Illustration of J Smith Esquire by Kellie Black

We were lucky enough to interview two of the exhibitors prior to the show, the first was J Smith Esquire. His exhibit is immediately to your right as you enter the exhibition, displaying his most recent foray into the high street market with a Mister Smith display of flat pack hats in colourful cut out leather. He told us about the collection: ‘Mister Smith is designed to be robust, accessible, affordable millinery with high design values, so everyone can have a J Smith Esquire hat’.

Photograph from Mister Smith collection by Florence Massey

Mixing together the ready-to-wear and couture, J Smiths talent shines with his main collections, the most recent entitled ‘Illuminated’ is sure to be as highly impressive as his previous efforts. The new collection promises to be VERY eclectic, ‘(it’s) inspired by vintage Italian fashion papers to create a modern-day Edwardian couture, and yes, expect a very colourful collection!’

Illustration of Little Shilpa by Yelena Bryksenkova

Little Shilpa’s stand is on each side as you exit the exhibition space, and displays an array of great headpieces, necklaces and hats. His work is crazy, but in a good way. The designs are definitely not for the wallflowers among us, something crystalised by his naming Bjork as a dream customer!

With an Indian heritage it is unsurprising to hear that the inspiration for his Headonism show picks up on this , ‘the pieces were inspired from Bombay and London, there was an obvious juxtaposition of the 2 cities …all the pieces were specially created for Headonism as it was my first formal showing in London hence a sort of introduction to my inspirations’.

Photograph of J Shilpa by Florence Massey

Little Shilpa agrees with Piers Atkinson’s very true comment that millinery has finally become more about having fun rather than the obligatory weddings and funerals, ‘working out of India it has always been about fun and design’. Long may that continue!

Talking of Piers Atkinson and the move away from wedding/funeral hats his stand is fantastic. More of an exploded flower stall mixed with Hollywood clichés and mini people, I spent a-g-e-s peering at every single one of his creations. With lots of green felt, and miniature people Atkinson definitely taps into the fun side of millinery and his collection is so good: silly, energetic and vibrant. Spilling with colours and quirks, the Hollywood sign features heavily, as do clashing flowers and little gold spikes. If you want a break from the oh so serious fashion upstairs at BFC, pop down to Atkinson’s stand for a giggle.

Illustration of Piers Atkinson by Kellie Black

Photograph of Piers Atkinson by Florence Massey

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In our second feature on PayneShurvell’s wonderful series of four day exhibitions titled 4×4, Every collaboration is the result of a sin. Amelia’s Magazine talks to Edward Vince, curator of the third installment; How Am I Not Myself about his Product Design practice, involvement with the collective KithKin, the work of Matthew Robinson and the inspiration behind staging an archival display within the walls of PayneShurvell.

Oh! And if you missed our first review of Daisy Delaney’s Dreams of Desire, you can read it here.

PayneShurvell’s private view for How I Am Not Myself is on Wednesday 22nd September at 6pm.

What first drew you towards the two mediums of design and curation?

Before going to Central Saint Martin’s I studied an art foundation course, and as the year developed I found myself at a crossroad, it was either fine art or design, and then after getting onto the Product Design course at CSM, it was an opportunity too good to turn down, so my background and inspirations have always been split between art and design and so my work always has been as a result. The curation element came from the exhibitions and events I was involved in after graduation.

What is the practice of the collective KithKin and what is your involvement?

KithKin is a collective started by a group of friends who graduated from Product Design at the same time. We exhibited our work at the LDF in 2007 in a bid to get more exposure for our degree work and to create something tangible after the relative anti-climax of graduation. We showed 16 different pieces of design, some our own and some the work of other people we admired. The show was a great success and we went on to produce exhibitions and events internationally in Tokyo, Birmingham and Milan, returning to London and Milan for 2 consecutive years. We also completed work for The Future Laboratory, Covent Garden, WGSN and a 7 week window display for Selfridges. The aim of KithKin was to involve and inspire.

Photograph from KithKin’s SomeRightsReserved, A download only shop for design in Milan in April 2008.

Which artists (if you did) were you referencing during your time on the course and do any continue to inspire your practice?

The Bauhaus was one of my earliest inspirations. Alexander Calder’s work, particularly his ‘mobiles’, first helped me to see the transition between a sketch and a 3 dimensional sculpture. Alan Fletcher is a designer whose work has such integrity and conviction that it still remains fresh and exciting decades later. I am also hugely inspired by the honest and humble message of the Arte Povera movement. Jeff Koons, John Baldessari and Wolfgang Tillmans are also artists that will always inspire my practice.

What is your relationship to the space between art and design? What do you consider this space to be?

I think there is a gap between art and design, but then in the same breath, where do you draw the line? Especially with the whole notion of the ready made, but I do think commercial design has lost its purity, no longer being about functionality and longevity but being brand driven and transient. I wish to create objects that are free from this, and for me I see this as being an art object, one of purity and simplicity. The only definite comparison I can draw is that they are both intended for consumption, albeit in varying forms.

How did you discover the work of Matthew Robinson?

Matthew is a good friend I first met in our first year of university, he studied at Chelsea while I was at CSM and then went onto the Slade. I have always enjoyed his work and am pleased to be able to involve him and to show our work together.

What was the decision process behind the idea to install a pop up museum within the gallery space? Why did you choose this display method?

The pop up museum isn’t happening in such a literal sense anymore. I am instead referencing museum collections and display through my work and the curation of the space.

How will the archival material be displayed during the exhibition at PayneShurvell?

It will be displayed in a very minimal and understated manner with subtle references to museums and galleries.

Does the display reference a particular type of museum? For instance the displays at The British Museum?What is included in your archive? And what purpose does it serve?

I have a collection of castor wheels that I purchased from a british manufacturer that makes them and nothing else, not even the chairs to put them on. I saw them at a trade show on display, they do a set of 24 Karat gold plated ones they designed specifically for the Arabic market. They are incredibly tactile and desirable objects and removed from their intended function become inanimate and entirely sculptural. The purpose is to draw attention to design of the everyday and the beauty in the mundane. Also understanding that every object has been designed, so it has a background and a story to tell, much like an ancient artifact you would find in a museum.

Will the archive continue to be added to, once the exhibition at PayneShurvell finishes?

The archive will continue, I am a collector of designed objects be them intentionally artistic or not, I see little difference, there is still a creator, an author and a consumer. It all depends on the context of their display.
I think the essence of an archive is that it is always ongoing, it will never be satisfied. Speak to a stamp collector or a train spotter or even a child with a sticker album, they won’t be satisfied until it is complete, and that conclusion is never guaranteed.

Do you have plans to reinstall the museum in a new space? Would the chosen display method change in relation to a new location?

Would love to take this exhibition, or its concept, to other galleries, cities or countries. One of the big things about my work is that the objects I have commissioned are very much about where they are made and who made them, giving them geographical and historical ties, this interests me as a travelling exhibition but also the potential to create the same ideas using different craftsmen in different cultures, using different materials and techniques so creating a whole new story and aesthetic. Location and context is very important in my work.

Does the location of PayneShurvell or the relationship between yourself and the gallery impact on the work you’ve included within the space?

It is the first exhibition I have curated in an art gallery context so for me it was an opportunity to raise my game, produce work and display it in a very professional and sophisticated manner.

What interested you about constructing an archive?

I think it’s a vain attempt at trying to understand and to some extent gain control of the world in which we live.

Where does the title of the show come from?

There is a wonderful film you may have seen called I Heart Huckabees. It is about existentialism and inner identity. It is very obscure and quite light hearted. It is a quote from this film and in my exhibition refers to objects, not people.

What’s next for Edward Vince?

This is the first show I have curated on my own and was also an opportunity to make work again. I wish to work on more exhibitions in the near future either as a curator or contributing artist. I am also setting up a design studio called VINCE & SON that will re-establish an old family business founded in 1863. It specialised in horse drawn carriage building and painting, and the new studio will focus on design for the arts and culture sector.

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