Listings

    No events to show

Follow

Twitter

|

Facebook

|

MySpace

|

Last.fm

RSS

Subscribe

Top 25 Art Blog - Creative Tourist

An interview with street artists and filmmakers Peru Ana Ana Peru

The co-founder of LAVA Collective chats to the Brooklyn-based multimedia artists.

Written by Paddy Walsh

Peru Ana Ana Peru are Brooklyn-based multimedia artists. Their bizarre, pharmacy colourful creations can be found all over the streets of New York, brightening up the city’s darkest corners and entertaining passers by. In their own words, they leave ‘keepsakes around the city for others to find.’ They produce fine art, which can be seen as an extension of their street work, and they also make films. Peru Ana Ana Peru are bursting with creativity and their artistic output tends to be eye-catching, witty and brilliant. I caught up with them last month to reminisce about their visit to the UK, and find out what they had been up to since then.

Peru Ana Ana Peru came to London late last year to take part in a LAVA Collective group show. They have fond memories of the trip: ‘London was great. There was a nice energy about the place, at least that’s what we gathered from the small time that we stayed. Definitely would like to spend more time out there if and when we can. LAVA was amazing, and working with them was a pleasure. They brought together a massive show that was very special and that people seemed to like’.

Earlier this year, Peru Ana Ana Peru were invited to take part in the Eames Re-imagined project, in which artists were invited to upholster and decorate a classic Eames chair design. This was a prestigious invitation and the finished result looks great, but as they reveal, it was not the most harmonious project they have ever worked on; ‘The process for the Eames Chair was an interesting one, and involved a long, final night of arguing and painting, arguing and cutting, arguing and gluing, etc. When we finished it we couldn’t tell if we liked it or not. So we went to bed, mad at the chair. Then we woke up and saw it again, and we started liking it’.

Having appeared in books like Street Art New York (Prestel), Peru Ana Ana Peru are perhaps best known as street artists, but in fact they see themselves primarily as film makers. In an interview with Brooklynstreetart.com they describe video as ‘the medium we feel the most comfortable in, and in which we feel we have the most to offer.’ They shoot most of their own material, but occasionally use found footage in their work. One film featured clips of 1950′s porn, shot on Super 8mm. I asked them where they found the source material; ‘We found this footage at a flea market in Chelsea ages ago, but we got it without bothering to look at what the footage was of. Then later when we got home, we decided to check it out, and we found that it was all porn, all of it. Like, 12 rolls of film. Some in color, some in black and white. We were floored. We had always wanted to use it for something, so one day we did. At the moment is no longer online because youtube took it off for violation of terms or whatever—We’ll have to get that video back online soon’.

Their last solo show at the Broolynite Gallery featured small TV screens imbedded into canvases, a format which unified their film making and illustration work. The show also featured some fantastic piñatas, which I couldn’t resist asking about: ‘The idea simply sprang from a long held fascination and nostalgia for piñatas, and the fact that we knew we wanted some 3D objects in our show. So, piñatas seemed natural. They were fun to make, and coincidentally a friend of ours, Meg Keys, happened to make piñatas pretty much for a living. So we hooked up with her and popped them out’. Are the any plans to make any more pinatas? ‘Perhaps one day’. It seems that revisiting old ideas is not high on the agenda for Peru Ana Ana Peru: ‘We tend to get extremely bored with things if we dwell on them too long.’ http://www.brooklynitegallery.com/

Last year, Peru Ana Ana Peru joined dozens of artists to take part in Public Ad Camapin’s NYSAT project (New York Street Advertisting Takeover). Public Ad Campaign is the brainchild of Jordan Seiler, who has been waging war against street-side advertising hoardings for many years now. Much of the advertisements that appear in American cities are placed there illegally with the tacit consent of the authorities. Seiler and collaborators whitewash these adverts, then invite artists to come and decorate the blank spaces they have created. I asked Peru Ana Ana Peru how they came to be involved with the project: ‘We got involved after we were contacted by Jordan, and we naturally agreed to be a part of it. We thought the concept of the project was amazing, and it is what has always drawn us to take part in anything he is involved with. Jordan is a very smart guy and his projects are always reflective of that’.

Finally, I asked Peru Ana Ana Peru if any New York artists had caught their eye recently. (I haven’t there for a while and I’m feeling out of the loop.) They mentioned a street artist I hadn’t heard of called Nohjcoley, I’ve been checking out his work and I think it is lovely, you can visit his photo stream here: http://www.flickr.com/photos/nohjcoleynotions

I’d like to thank Peru Ana Ana Peru for taking the time to talk to me. You can check out their films on Vimeo, including my personal favorite, ‘On the Roof’: http://vimeo.com/peruanaanaperu


Illustration by Gemma Milly of Zara Gorman’s Millinery.

Over the last few years the RCA’s MA Fashion course has quietly been producing a series of innovative designers – from menswear designers James Long and Katie Eary to womenswear’s Michael van der Ham, page Erdem and Holly Fulton (whose influence could already be seen on the Bournemouth catwalk). All of whom (except Erdem ) subsequently showed at London Fashion Week via Lulu Kennedy’s Fashion East.

The RCA MA course consists of several different courses from Millinery (a course of one) from which Zara Gorman showed her exquisitely shaped hats…

Illustration by Katie Harvey

to Womenswear and Menswear knit, accessories, shoes and of course Womenswear and Menswear. The accompanying press release listed the words of inspiration mentioned by the students in relation to their individual collections and the words that fitted the show as a whole. It was slightly disconcerting to see the world ‘Chav’ being used as an inspiration, a word created by the press to demean those that wore Burberry Check head to toe (Pre Christopher Bailey Hello Danielle Westbrook) it’s connotations appear to be similar to Noveau Rich – those with too much money and not enough taste.

A look celebrated and parodied by Ab Fab’s Eddie and her love for trends and ‘hot’ designers, It’s impossible to not know she’s wearing a ‘designer’. Astrid Andersen plays with fashion’s ability to celebrate and pastiche it’s own brand at the same time on the same item (think LV’s monogrammed bags or Moschino Jeans). Her menswear is certainly not forgettable, nor was Courtney McWilliams’s take on sportswear in which the t-shirts and jackets proudly beared that particularly English symbol: the pit-bull.


Illustration by Joseph Keirs

This was an incredible exhibition of the craft, research and invention that is currently occurring within the Fashion Department of the RCA.

Menswear designer Trine Jensen presented breathtaking sweaters embroided with charms (as in bracelet) to hoops.

Sam McCoach’s womenswear knit Illustration by Lesley Barnes

Alison Linton also specialised in knitwear producing ethereally delicate dresses, it is fantastic to see a continuing return and reinvention of age old materials and techniques.

Victoria Stone’s cut up shirts… Illustration By Marnie Hollande

Poppy Cartwright’s white PVC collection was reminiscent of Christopher Kane’s black SS10 presentation.


.

Frances Convey’s colour and shapes

Illustration by Katie Harvey

Illustration by Lesley Barnes

The monochrome creped collection by Cecile Bahnsen came complete with 1990′s inspired sportswear jackets. Elements of grunge reappears through the designers choice of length – often the dresses hang tightly around the ankle. Flashes of Amber from clueless appear with the presentation of the Fez hat. It’s that time already. The revival of the 1990′s.

Illustration by Marnie Hollande

Bahnsen’s monochrome was interspersed with cut out pieces – bordering on body amour – softened through the colouring of pastel pink.

This is but a small selection of the graduates from this year’s RCA show, the more this reviewer revisits the look book accompanying the show the more previously unnoticed details emerge from these young designers collections.
peru-ana-ana-peru-public-ad-campaign
Peru Ana Ana Peru participate in Public Ad Campaign.

The bizarre, store colourful creations of Peru Ana Ana Peru can be found all over the streets of New York, prescription brightening up the city’s darkest corners and entertaining passers by. In their own words, viagra they leave ‘keepsakes around the city for others to find.’ They produce fine art, which can be seen as an extension of their street work, and they also make films. Peru Ana Ana Peru are bursting with creativity and their artistic output tends to be eye-catching, witty and brilliant. I caught up with them last month to reminisce about their visit to the UK, and find out what they had been up to since then.

peru-ana-ana-peru_dogs
Dogs.

Peru Ana Ana Peru came to London late last year to take part in a LAVA Collective group show. They have fond memories of the trip: ‘London was great. There was a nice energy about the place, at least that’s what we gathered from the small time that we stayed. Definitely would like to spend more time out there if and when we can. LAVA was amazing, and working with them was a pleasure. They brought together a massive show that was very special and that people seemed to like’.

Earlier this year, Peru Ana Ana Peru were invited to take part in the Eames Re-imagined project, in which artists were invited to upholster and decorate a classic Eames chair design. This was a prestigious invitation and the finished result looks great, but as they reveal, it was not the most harmonious project they have ever worked on; ‘The process for the Eames Chair was an interesting one, and involved a long, final night of arguing and painting, arguing and cutting, arguing and gluing, etc. When we finished it we couldn’t tell if we liked it or not. So we went to bed, mad at the chair. Then we woke up and saw it again, and we started liking it’.

peru-ana-ana-peru-eames-chair
Eames chair design.

Having appeared in books like Street Art New York (Prestel), Peru Ana Ana Peru are perhaps best known as street artists, but in fact they see themselves primarily as film makers. In an interview with Brooklynstreetart.com they describe video as ‘the medium we feel the most comfortable in, and in which we feel we have the most to offer.’ They shoot most of their own material, but occasionally use found footage in their work. One film featured clips of 1950′s porn, shot on Super 8mm. I asked them where they found the source material; ‘We found this footage at a flea market in Chelsea ages ago, but we got it without bothering to look at what the footage was of. Then later when we got home, we decided to check it out, and we found that it was all porn, all of it. Like, 12 rolls of film. Some in color, some in black and white. We were floored. We had always wanted to use it for something, so one day we did. At the moment is no longer online because youtube took it off for violation of terms or whatever—We’ll have to get that video back online soon’.

peru-ana-ana-peru-sculpture

Their last solo show at the Brooklynite Gallery featured small TV screens imbedded into canvases, a format which unified their film making and illustration work. The show also featured some fantastic piñatas, which I couldn’t resist asking about: ‘The idea simply sprang from a long held fascination and nostalgia for piñatas, and the fact that we knew we wanted some 3D objects in our show. So, piñatas seemed natural. They were fun to make, and coincidentally a friend of ours, Meg Keys, happened to make piñatas pretty much for a living. So we hooked up with her and popped them out’. Are the any plans to make any more pinatas? ‘Perhaps one day’. It seems that revisiting old ideas is not high on the agenda for Peru Ana Ana Peru: ‘We tend to get extremely bored with things if we dwell on them too long.’

peru-ana-ana-peru-street-art-book

Last year, Peru Ana Ana Peru joined dozens of artists to take part in Public Ad Camapin’s NYSAT project (New York Street Advertisting Takeover). Public Ad Campaign is the brainchild of Jordan Seiler, who has been waging war against street-side advertising hoardings for many years now. Much of the advertisements that appear in American cities are placed there illegally with the tacit consent of the authorities. Seiler and collaborators whitewash these adverts, then invite artists to come and decorate the blank spaces they have created. I asked Peru Ana Ana Peru how they came to be involved with the project: ‘We got involved after we were contacted by Jordan, and we naturally agreed to be a part of it. We thought the concept of the project was amazing, and it is what has always drawn us to take part in anything he is involved with. Jordan is a very smart guy and his projects are always reflective of that’.

Finally, I asked Peru Ana Ana Peru if any New York artists had caught their eye recently. (I haven’t there for a while and I’m feeling out of the loop.) They mentioned a street artist I hadn’t heard of called Nohjcoley, I’ve been checking out his work and I think it is lovely, you can visit his photo stream here.

nohjcoley-mural-art
Mural Art by Nohjcoley.

I’d like to thank Peru Ana Ana Peru for taking the time to talk to me. You can check out their films on Vimeo, including my personal favorite, ‘On the Roof’: which you can watch here

Tags:

, , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Similar Posts:

Leave a Reply