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Top 25 Art Blog - Creative Tourist

Secret Garden Party 2010: Soul Fire Restaurant Review

Nestled inside three cosy yurts, the Soul Fire Restaurant was a unique Secret Garden Party dining experience that featured delicious ethically and locally sourced food.

Written by Amelia Gregory

SGP 2010- headdress by Amelia Gregory

On my rambles around festivals this year it has been hard to escape the omnipresence of floral head garlands on the ladies, more about and indeed worn by some of the more daring men… I recall a particularly dashing pair of matching flower topped bald male bonces espied through the crowd in the Cabaret Arena at Latitude. I’m sure they were straight.

At Glastonbury and Latitude these garlands were usually bought off the peg at a stall, tadalafil but Gardeners (as they are called) at Secret Garden Party were a little more inventive with their head gear. From decorated top hats to Indian feather headdresses to stuffed birds, viagra decorative headwear provided ample opportunity for experiment in colour, combination and height.

Here are some of the most inventive and appealing creations I saw at Secret Garden Party. Photography by Amelia Gregory.

SGP 2010-headdress by Amelia Gregory
I loved this creation – the height, the space, the use of colour. Beautiful.

SGP 2010-headdress by Amelia Gregory
This girl had used her own hair to create ears.

SGP 2010-headdress by Amelia Gregory
Gorgeous butterflies. Simple but effective.

SGP 2010-headdress by Amelia Gregory
Bees. Leaves. Flowers. Pile em on!

SGP 2010-headdress by Amelia Gregory
This girl had found loads of crap in her house and stuck it all on, including a Sheriff’s badge and a Toucan (just visible on the top)

SGP 2010-headdress by Amelia Gregory
A boy with a stuffed bird in this afro. As you do.

SGP 2010-headdress by Amelia Gregory
A huge holographic rainbow butterfly headdress.

SGP 2010-headdress by Amelia Gregory
Native American Indian inspired headdresses were very popular.

SGP 2010-headdress by Amelia Gregory
My friend Dora does a simple red top hat extremely well.

SGP 2010-headdress by Amelia Gregory
A little molecular number.

SGP 2010-headdress by Amelia Gregory
Channelling Louix XVI via Burlesque.

SGP 2010-headdress by Amelia Gregory
Sometimes more is more, don’t you find?

SGP 2010-headdress by Amelia Gregory
Jemima with a found thistle and fake flowers.

SGP 2010-headdress by Amelia Gregory
Classy, and strangely inaccurate too.

SGP 2010-Pearl and Ivy headdress by Amelia Gregory
Lastly, Pearl and Ivy, or should that be Carly and Sam, here seen modelling their own creations which were for sale at Secret Garden Party.

SGP 2010-Pearl and Ivy headdress Amelia Gregory
And myself wearing one – c’mon, I had to get into the spirit of it all didn’t I?! You can buy a similar feather headdress from Pearl and Ivy from their online website.
SGP 2010- headdress by Amelia Gregory

On my rambles around festivals this year it has been hard to escape the omnipresence of floral head garlands on the ladies, cialis 40mg and indeed worn by some of the more daring men… I recall a particularly dashing pair of matching flower topped bald male bonces espied through the crowd in the Cabaret Arena at Latitude. I’m sure they were straight.

At Glastonbury and Latitude these garlands were usually bought off the peg at a stall, website like this but Gardeners (as they are called) at Secret Garden Party were a little more inventive with their head gear. From decorated top hats to Indian feather headdresses to stuffed birds, decorative headwear provided ample opportunity for experiment in colour, combination and height.

Here are some of the most inventive and appealing creations I saw at Secret Garden Party. Photography by Amelia Gregory.

SGP 2010-headdress by Amelia Gregory
I loved this creation – the height, the space, the use of colour. Beautiful.

SGP 2010-headdress by Amelia Gregory
This girl had used her own hair to create ears.

SGP 2010-headdress by Amelia Gregory
Gorgeous butterflies. Simple but effective.

SGP 2010-headdress by Amelia Gregory
Bees. Leaves. Flowers. Pile em on!

SGP 2010-headdress by Amelia Gregory
This girl had found loads of crap in her house and stuck it all on, including a Sheriff’s badge and a Toucan (just visible on the top)

SGP 2010-headdress by Amelia Gregory
A boy with a stuffed bird in this afro. As you do.

SGP 2010-headdress by Amelia Gregory
A huge holographic rainbow butterfly headdress.

SGP 2010-headdress by Amelia Gregory
Native American Indian inspired headdresses were very popular.

SGP 2010-headdress by Amelia Gregory
My friend Dora does a simple red top hat extremely well.

SGP 2010-headdress by Amelia Gregory
A little molecular number.

SGP 2010-headdress by Amelia Gregory
Channelling Louix XVI via Burlesque.

SGP 2010-headdress by Amelia Gregory
Sometimes more is more, don’t you find?

SGP 2010-headdress by Amelia Gregory
Jemima with a found thistle and fake flowers.

SGP 2010-headdress by Amelia Gregory
Classy, and strangely inaccurate too.

SGP 2010-Pearl and Ivy headdress by Amelia Gregory
Lastly, Pearl and Ivy, or should that be Carly and Sam, here seen modelling their own creations which were for sale at Secret Garden Party.

SGP 2010-Pearl and Ivy headdress Amelia Gregory
And myself wearing one – c’mon, I had to get into the spirit of it all didn’t I?! You can buy a similar feather headdress from Pearl and Ivy from their online website.
SGP 2010- headdress by Amelia Gregory

On my rambles around festivals this year it has been hard to escape the omnipresence of floral head garlands on the ladies, shop and indeed worn by some of the more daring men… I recall a particularly dashing pair of matching flower topped bald male bonces espied through the crowd in the Cabaret Arena at Latitude.

At Glastonbury and Latitude these garlands were usually bought off the peg at a stall, but Gardeners (as they are called) at Secret Garden Party were a little more inventive with their head gear. From decorated top hats to Indian feather headdresses to stuffed birds, decorative headwear provided ample opportunity for experiment in colour, combination and height.

Here are some of the most inventive and appealing creations I saw at Secret Garden Party.

Photography by Amelia Gregory.

SGP 2010-headdress by Amelia Gregory
I loved this creation – the height, the space, the use of colour. Beautiful.

SGP 2010-headdress by Amelia Gregory
This girl had used her own hair to create ears.

SGP 2010-headdress by Amelia Gregory
Gorgeous butterflies. Simple but effective.

SGP 2010-headdress by Amelia Gregory
Bees. Leaves. Flowers. Stuffed animals. Pile em on!

SGP 2010-headdress by Amelia Gregory
This girl had found loads of crap in her house and stuck it all on, including a Sheriff’s badge, handcuffs and a Toucan (just visible on the top)

SGP 2010-headdress by Amelia Gregory
A boy with a stuffed bird in his ‘fro. As you do.

SGP 2010-headdress by Amelia Gregory
A huge holographic rainbow butterfly headdress.

SGP 2010-headdress by Amelia Gregory
Native American Indian inspired headdresses were very popular.

SGP 2010-headdress by Amelia Gregory
My friend Dora does a simple red top hat extremely well.

SGP 2010-headdress by Amelia Gregory
A little molecular number.

SGP 2010-headdress by Amelia Gregory
Channelling Louix XVI via Burlesque.

SGP 2010-headdress by Amelia Gregory
Sometimes more is more, don’t you find?

SGP 2010-headdress by Amelia Gregory
Jemima with a found thistle and fake flowers.

SGP 2010-headdress by Amelia Gregory
Classy, and strangely inaccurate too.

SGP 2010-Pearl and Ivy headdress by Amelia Gregory
Lastly, Pearl and Ivy, or should that be Carly and Sam, here seen modelling their own creations which were for sale at Secret Garden Party.

SGP 2010-Pearl and Ivy headdress Amelia Gregory
And myself wearing one – c’mon, I had to get into the spirit of it all didn’t I?! You can buy a similar feather headdress from Pearl and Ivy from their online website.
SGP 2010- headdress by Amelia Gregory

On my rambles around festivals this year it has been hard to escape the omnipresence of floral head garlands on the ladies, buy and indeed worn by some of the more daring men… I recall a particularly dashing pair of matching flower topped bald male bonces espied through the crowd in the Cabaret Arena at Latitude.

At Glastonbury and Latitude these garlands were usually bought off the peg at a stall, unhealthy but Gardeners (as they are called) at Secret Garden Party were a little more inventive with their head gear. From decorated top hats to Indian feather headdresses to stuffed birds, decorative headwear provided ample opportunity for experiment in colour, combination and height.

Here are some of the most inventive and appealing creations I saw at Secret Garden Party.

Photography by Amelia Gregory.

SGP 2010-headdress by Amelia Gregory
I loved this creation – the height, the space, the use of colour. Beautiful.

SGP 2010-headdress by Amelia Gregory
This girl had used her own hair to create ears.

SGP 2010-headdress by Amelia Gregory
Gorgeous butterflies. Simple but effective.

SGP 2010-headdress by Amelia Gregory
Bees. Leaves. Flowers. Stuffed animals. Pile em on!

SGP 2010-headdress by Amelia Gregory
This girl had found loads of crap in her house and stuck it all on, including a Sheriff’s badge, handcuffs and a Toucan (just visible on the top)

SGP 2010-headdress by Amelia Gregory
A boy with a stuffed bird in his ‘fro. As you do.

SGP 2010-headdress by Amelia Gregory
A huge holographic rainbow butterfly headdress.

SGP 2010-headdress by Amelia Gregory
Native American Indian inspired headdresses were very popular.

SGP 2010-headdress by Amelia Gregory
My friend Dora does a simple red top hat extremely well.

SGP 2010-headdress by Amelia Gregory
A little molecular number.

SGP 2010-headdress by Amelia Gregory
Channelling Louix XVI via Burlesque.

SGP 2010-headdress by Amelia Gregory
Sometimes more is more, don’t you find?

SGP 2010-headdress by Amelia Gregory
Jemima with a found thistle and fake flowers.

SGP 2010-headdress by Amelia Gregory
Classy, and strangely inaccurate too.

SGP 2010-Pearl and Ivy headdress by Amelia Gregory
Lastly, Pearl and Ivy, or should that be Carly and Sam, here seen modelling their own creations which were for sale at Secret Garden Party.

SGP 2010-Pearl and Ivy headdress Amelia Gregory
And myself wearing one – c’mon, I had to get into the spirit of it all didn’t I?! You can buy a similar feather headdress from Pearl and Ivy from their online website.
SGP 2010- headdress by Amelia Gregory

On my rambles around festivals this year it has been hard to escape the omnipresence of floral head garlands on the ladies, click and indeed worn by some of the more daring men… I recall a particularly dashing pair of matching flower topped bald male bonces espied through the crowd in the Cabaret Arena at Latitude.

At Glastonbury and Latitude these garlands were usually bought off the peg at a stall, price but Gardeners (as they are called) at Secret Garden Party were a little more inventive with their head gear. From decorated top hats to Indian feather headdresses to stuffed birds, decorative headwear provided ample opportunity for experiment in colour, combination and height.

Here are some of the most inventive and appealing creations I saw at Secret Garden Party.

Photography by Amelia Gregory.

SGP 2010-headdress by Amelia Gregory
I loved this creation – the height, the space, the use of colour. Beautiful.

SGP 2010-headdress by Amelia Gregory
This girl had used her own hair to create ears.

SGP 2010-headdress by Amelia Gregory
Gorgeous butterflies. Simple but effective.

SGP 2010-headdress by Amelia Gregory
Bees. Leaves. Flowers. Stuffed animals. Pile em on!

SGP 2010-headdress by Amelia Gregory
This girl had found loads of crap in her house and stuck it all on, including a Sheriff’s badge, handcuffs and a Toucan (just visible on the top)

SGP 2010-headdress by Amelia Gregory
A boy with a stuffed bird in his ‘fro. As you do.

SGP 2010-headdress by Amelia Gregory
A huge holographic rainbow butterfly headdress.

SGP 2010-headdress by Amelia Gregory
Native American Indian inspired headdresses were very popular.

SGP 2010-headdress by Amelia Gregory
My friend Dora does a simple red top hat extremely well.

SGP 2010-headdress by Amelia Gregory
A little molecular number.

SGP 2010-headdress by Amelia Gregory
Channelling Louix XVI via Burlesque.

SGP 2010-headdress by Amelia Gregory
Sometimes more is more, don’t you find?

SGP 2010-headdress by Amelia Gregory
Jemima with a found thistle and fake flowers.

SGP 2010-headdress by Amelia Gregory
Classy, and strangely inaccurate too.

SGP 2010-Pearl and Ivy headdress by Amelia Gregory
Lastly, Pearl and Ivy, or should that be Carly and Sam, here seen modelling their own creations which were for sale at Secret Garden Party.

SGP 2010-Pearl and Ivy headdress Amelia Gregory
And myself wearing one – c’mon, I had to get into the spirit of it all didn’t I?! You can buy a similar feather headdress from Pearl and Ivy from their online website.
Latitude 2010-Active Child by Amelia Gregory
Active Child. Photography by Amelia Gregory.

The falsetto sounds of Active Child were our new discovery for Saturday morning. American Pat Grossi alone on stage with just his mixer, cheapest computer… and harp: another lone electro maestro. Soporifically beautiful.

JAMES-LATITUDE-JENNY-GOLDSTONE
James by Jenny Goldstone.

James were our mid afternoon treat over at the Obelisk Arena – but we didn’t just sit down, we lay spark out and enjoyed a full tour through their back catalogue of hits from a horizontal position. I was somewhat surprised to note that the lead singer is now bald of bounce and goatee of beard when I am sure he used to have lots of curly locks and a clean shave – oh the perils of ageing.

Latitude 2010-kids by Amelia Gregory
Latitude 2010-family by Amelia Gregory
Latitude 2010-girls by Amelia Gregory
Latitude 2010-chips by Amelia Gregory

We were surrounded by lots of families, parents obviously revelling in a favourite from their youth, whilst even the teens next to us could sing along to the band’s most famous tune. And it seems we weren’t the only ones having a relaxing time.

Latitude 2010-gaggle choir by Amelia Gregory

In the woods we encountered a bunch of singing girls in wonderful outfits. Now why don’t all choirs dress like the Gaggle? I couldn’t really hear them, but darn it, who cares when they look this good?!

faye skinner FIRST AID kit
First Aid Kit, protected by a burly security man, by Faye Skinner.

I love it when a band I’ve loved forever starts to gain widespread success, and First Aid Kit have now reached a stage where they could draw suitably impressive crowds to the wooded environs of the Sunrise Arena. If you haven’t yet seen them live, then why the hell not? You can read a previous review of their gig at the Union Chapel here.

Crystal-Castles-Latitude-2010-by-Mina-Bach
Crystal Castles by Mina Bach.

Over on the other side Crystal Castles arrived to a cascading wall of squelching beats that had the middle aged couple next to me pulling somewhat bemused faces at each other. Goodness knows what they made of Alice’s performance thereafter. Whilst slugging on a bottle of Jim Beam *rock n roll* she declared that gang bangers should “all be castrated” – the first inkling I had that all was not well at Latitude. Thereafter she was hellbent on crowdsurfing through the entire set, which mainly involved flinging herself into the rather excited male audience down front and then punching them if they grabbed her inappropriately, before being dragged back by security. Oh how the burly men in uniform love it when the singer does that. Rather inexplicably one fan insisted on giving Alice a placard featuring the immortal word TOAST and, yup, you got it, a picture of a piece of toast. There’s been much grumbling online about Alice’s performance but I thoroughly enjoyed it, even if it did look rather like she had to yak at one point.

Latitude 2010-belle and sebastian by Amelia Gregory
sarah martin belle and sebastain by kate blandford
Sarah Martin of Belle and Sebastain by Kate Blandford.

The pace changed down a gear with the arrival of headliners Belle and Sebastian, playing their first gig in many years. First comment from those next to me? “She looks a bit mumsy.” And so what if Sarah does? Belle and Sebastian are not exactly in the first flush of youth, a fact which frontman Stuart Murdoch picked up repeatedly as he declared “they promised us an old crowd” – as usual the front was of course packed out with teenagers whilst the oldies (that seems to include me these days) hung back for a bit of air. Not that I’ve ever been a massive fan of the mosh pit. At one point Stuart threatened to take his top off (he was looking rather fit) which caused a fresh round of adolescent screaming “it would be like walking in on your dad in the shower” he laughed. It was a delightful set that featured an impromptu rendition of the Rolling Stones Jumping Jack Flash and finished with a gaggle of very happy teenagers dancing around on stage in front of the wrinkles and their orchestra. “You just made an old man very happy,” laughed Stuart in his lilting Scottish brogue, “now get off.” You show them who’s boss round here!

Read my Sunday music review here.
James Acaster by Kathryn Jones
James Acaster by Kathryn Jones.

Over the course of Latitude I saw numerous comedians, web some of whom appeared as comperes on other stages when not performing to surely one of their biggest ever audience (of thousands) in the Comedy Arena. The Cabaret Arena was much favoured, unhealthy as of course was the Literary Arena – hanging out with Robin Ince and his fabled posse.

Kevin Eldon, prostate Phil Jupitas, Josie Long… they all dropped by, frequently.

Latitude 2010-Phil Jupitas by Amelia Gregory
Phil Jupitas. Photography by Amelia Gregory.

Robin Ince by Stacie Swift
Robin Ince by Stacie Swift.

My favourite part of the longstanding Book Club was a guide to one of Robin Ince’s favourite bad books: Mens’ Secrets, set to a duelling musical accompaniment.

Latitude 2010 James Acaster by Amelia Gregory
James Acaster.

James Acaster was one such novice who I saw happily entertaining pre-act literary crowds with clever improv. Teenage wonder Ivo Graham kept the Cabaret crowd thoroughly entertained with his impromptu rendition of Blind Date – amusingly he is so young he had to be told of Cilla’s name. Weird to think of Blind Date already consigned to ancient TV history.

Latitude 2010-Ivo Graham Blind Date by Amelia Gregory
Latitude 2010-Ivo Graham Blind Date by Amelia Gregory
Ivo Graham improvises a round of Blind Date in the Cabaret Arena.

The main Comedy Arena was my favourite place to hang out in 2007, and it’s popularity continues to grow. Despite additional wing tents on each side of the huge central marquee, the arena remained unable to contain the enthusiastic crowds, who kicked up huge volumes of dust with every new exodus and influx.

Abi Daker - Ivo Graham
Ivo Graham by Abigail Daker.
YouTube Preview Image

One of the biggest draws of Latitude is the chance to discover new talent. Ivo Graham is a mere 19 years old, which made his ability to engage a massive audience all the more impressive. With jokes centred around Facebook, pesky younger brothers and getting in trouble with mum, he still struck a chord with the older folks.

Eric Lambert by Gareth A Hopkins
Eric Lambert by Gareth A Hopkins.

Eric Lambert was winner of the Latitude New Act of the Year 2010, although from what I heard Ivo would have been way more deserving…. or James. Eric’s winning performance centred around an improv routine that wasn’t always quite up to scratch.

Latitude 2010-Eric Lambert by Amelia Gregory
Eric Lambert.

He was cheeky and sexual, no doubt a hit with the ladies. It’s proved nigh on impossible to do any research into Eric since he seems to have zero internet presence… but I would guess from his demeanour that he’s a big fan of Russell Brand.

docbrown_by_iamanoctopus
Doc Brown by Iamanoctopus.

Of the better known comedians I really enjoyed the guide to slang courtesy of Doc Brown, who was formerly a rapper and just happens to be younger brother of Zadie Smith. Sucking snot out of his small child and inappropriate comments on packed buses define his descent towards the normality of family life.

stephen-k-amos-suziewinsor
Stephen K. Amos by Suzie Winsor.

Following him on Friday South Londoner Stephen K. Amos was suitably un-PC, berating his previous Yorkshire audience for its lack of diversity, ripping the piss out of posh people, bemoaning his old age (he’s 35. there’s no hope for me) and generally causing loud if somewhat uncomfortable chuckles across the arena.

On Sunday we caught the tail end of Rufus Hound, who was indeed face-painted up like a dog, if somewhat lacking of a tail. He spoke of the trials and tribulations of marriage and babies… which led onto the misogynistic diatribe of Richard Herring, a 43 year old singleton who made jokes about tit wanks and gay sex, accompanied by a signer for those hard of hearing. Or perhaps just to afford the opportunity to make yet more lewd jokes.

Richard Herring by Sine Skau
Richard Herring by Sine Skau.

He also over-milked an incredibly tedious tirade about Mars Bars that met with a fairly frosty reception… that became part of the act… that increased it’s tediousity. I think he was my least favourite comedian at Latitude.

ANDREW LAWRENCE Faye Skinner
Andrew Lawrence by Faye Skinner.

Next up Andrew Lawrence was really quite sinister but also strangely endearing, geared as his jokes were around his all round lack of appeal. Hey, why the sadness? I’ve always had a soft spot for scrawny gingers! Leaning back at a jaunty angle and grinning demonically he spoke of his semi-autistic relationship with his current (long-suffering) girlfriend. Hey, doesn’t that cover most men?

Latitude 2010- Deborah Francis White by Amelia Gregory
Deborah Francis White.

Lastly, Deborah Francis White put on her genius show How To Get Almost Anyone To Want To Sleep With You on Sunday in the Cabaret Arena. “Every actor wants to be in a sitcom, every man wants to be in a woman,” she informed us, talking us through a series of pie charts that showed the different state of mind for women. Whilst we’d like practically every man we meet to want to sleep with us (approximately 95% according to Deborah) the reverse is true when it comes to the amount of men we actually want to sleep with.

Deborah Francis White Oversees a Bra Fight by Gareth A Hopkins
Deborah Francis White Oversees a Bra Fight by Gareth A Hopkins.

To a chorus of knowing laughter from women, slightly nervous laughter from the men, she talked us through the best way to pull the opposite sex. “Be a Scorsese movie!” she opined, extolling the virtues of confidence. “You’re probably not going to get a part in me…” But the point is that every man should want to. Even if the reason they’re so fixated on lesbian porn is simply “two tits good, four tits better.”

Latitude 2010- Deborah Francis White by Amelia Gregory
Women stroking themselves to much amusement.

Latitude 2010- Deborah Francis White by Amelia Gregory
Tube-hanging.

She persuaded the women in the audience to stroke themselves on the breast to turn the men on, pulled people out of the audience to follow her instructions on how to tell a girl on the tube she’s gorgeous, and finished with a bra wrestling match between two men. Because who wants to sleep with a man who can’t get a bra off with one hand?

The comedy at Latitude Festival is undeniably one of its biggest selling points… now if only they could figure out how to accommodate the heaving numbers of people that yearn to be amused.

James Acaster by Kathryn Jones
James Acaster by Kathryn Jones.

Over the course of Latitude I saw numerous comedians, viagra approved some of whom appeared as comperes on other stages when not performing to surely one of their biggest ever audience (of thousands) in the Comedy Arena. The Cabaret Arena was much favoured, web as of course was the Literary Arena – hanging out with Robin Ince and his fabled posse.

Kevin Eldon, Phil Jupitas, Josie Long… they all dropped by, frequently.

Latitude 2010-Phil Jupitas by Amelia Gregory
Phil Jupitas. Photography by Amelia Gregory.

Robin Ince by Stacie Swift
Robin Ince by Stacie Swift.

My favourite part of the longstanding Book Club was a guide to one of Robin Ince’s favourite bad books: Mens’ Secrets, set to a duelling musical accompaniment.

Latitude 2010 James Acaster by Amelia Gregory
James Acaster.

James Acaster was one such novice who I saw happily entertaining pre-act literary crowds with clever improv. Teenage wonder Ivo Graham kept the Cabaret crowd thoroughly entertained with his impromptu rendition of Blind Date – amusingly he is so young he had to be told of Cilla’s name. Weird to think of Blind Date already consigned to ancient TV history.

Latitude 2010-Ivo Graham Blind Date by Amelia Gregory
Latitude 2010-Ivo Graham Blind Date by Amelia Gregory
Ivo Graham improvises a round of Blind Date in the Cabaret Arena.

The main Comedy Arena was my favourite place to hang out in 2007, and it’s popularity continues to grow. Despite additional wing tents on each side of the huge central marquee, the arena remained unable to contain the enthusiastic crowds, who kicked up huge volumes of dust with every new exodus and influx.

Abi Daker - Ivo Graham
Ivo Graham by Abigail Daker.
YouTube Preview Image

One of the biggest draws of Latitude is the chance to discover new talent. Ivo Graham is a mere 19 years old, which made his ability to engage a massive audience all the more impressive. With jokes centred around Facebook, pesky younger brothers and getting in trouble with mum, he still struck a chord with the older folks.

Eric Lambert by Gareth A Hopkins
Eric Lambert by Gareth A Hopkins.

Eric Lambert was winner of the Latitude New Act of the Year 2010, although from what I heard Ivo would have been way more deserving…. or James. Eric’s winning performance centred around an improv routine that wasn’t always quite up to scratch.

Latitude 2010-Eric Lambert by Amelia Gregory
Eric Lambert.

He was cheeky and sexual, no doubt a hit with the ladies. It’s proved nigh on impossible to do any research into Eric since he seems to have zero internet presence… but I would guess from his demeanour that he’s a big fan of Russell Brand.

docbrown_by_iamanoctopus
Doc Brown by Iamanoctopus.

Of the better known comedians I really enjoyed the guide to slang courtesy of Doc Brown, who was formerly a rapper and just happens to be younger brother of Zadie Smith. Sucking snot out of his small child and inappropriate comments on packed buses define his descent towards the normality of family life.

stephen-k-amos-suziewinsor
Stephen K. Amos by Suzie Winsor.

Following him on Friday South Londoner Stephen K. Amos was suitably un-PC, berating his previous Yorkshire audience for its lack of diversity, ripping the piss out of posh people, bemoaning his old age (he’s 35. there’s no hope for me) and generally causing loud if somewhat uncomfortable chuckles across the arena.

On Sunday we caught the tail end of Rufus Hound, who was indeed face-painted up like a dog, if somewhat lacking of a tail. He spoke of the trials and tribulations of marriage and babies… which led onto the misogynistic diatribe of Richard Herring, a 43 year old singleton who made jokes about tit wanks and gay sex, accompanied by a signer for those hard of hearing. Or perhaps just to afford the opportunity to make yet more lewd jokes.

Richard Herring by Sine Skau
Richard Herring by Sine Skau.

He also over-milked an incredibly tedious tirade about Mars Bars that met with a fairly frosty reception… that became part of the act… that increased it’s tediousity. I think he was my least favourite comedian at Latitude.

ANDREW LAWRENCE Faye Skinner
Andrew Lawrence by Faye West.

Next up Andrew Lawrence was really quite sinister but also strangely endearing, geared as his jokes were around his all round lack of appeal. Hey, why the sadness? I’ve always had a soft spot for scrawny gingers! Leaning back at a jaunty angle and grinning demonically he spoke of his semi-autistic relationship with his current (long-suffering) girlfriend. Hey, doesn’t that cover most men?

Latitude 2010- Deborah Francis White by Amelia Gregory
Deborah Francis White.

Lastly, Deborah Francis White put on her genius show How To Get Almost Anyone To Want To Sleep With You on Sunday in the Cabaret Arena. “Every actor wants to be in a sitcom, every man wants to be in a woman,” she informed us, talking us through a series of pie charts that showed the different state of mind for women. Whilst we’d like practically every man we meet to want to sleep with us (approximately 95% according to Deborah) the reverse is true when it comes to the amount of men we actually want to sleep with.

Deborah Francis White Oversees a Bra Fight by Gareth A Hopkins
Deborah Francis White Oversees a Bra Fight by Gareth A Hopkins.

To a chorus of knowing laughter from women, slightly nervous laughter from the men, she talked us through the best way to pull the opposite sex. “Be a Scorsese movie!” she opined, extolling the virtues of confidence. “You’re probably not going to get a part in me…” But the point is that every man should want to. Even if the reason they’re so fixated on lesbian porn is simply “two tits good, four tits better.”

Latitude 2010- Deborah Francis White by Amelia Gregory
Women stroking themselves to much amusement.

Latitude 2010- Deborah Francis White by Amelia Gregory
Tube-hanging.

She persuaded the women in the audience to stroke themselves on the breast to turn the men on, pulled people out of the audience to follow her instructions on how to tell a girl on the tube she’s gorgeous, and finished with a bra wrestling match between two men. Because who wants to sleep with a man who can’t get a bra off with one hand?

The comedy at Latitude Festival is undeniably one of its biggest selling points… now if only they could figure out how to accommodate the heaving numbers of people that yearn to be amused.

Soulfire Illustration Kayleigh Bluck
The Soul Fire Restaurant illustrated by Kayleigh Bluck.

A gourmet three course meal served up by a world class chef (Charlie Nicoll, cialis 40mg formerly of the River Cafe) – at a festival? You could be forgiven for thinking you’d just heard wrong. But this was exactly what I enjoyed on Friday night at the Soul Fire Restaurant at Secret Garden Party this year.

SGP 2010-soulfire yurt by Amelia gregory

Guests were encouraged to book their place online, seek and the restaurant (housed in three cosy yurts backing onto a kitchen preparation area) was busy as soon as we arrived for the first sitting at the leisurely hour of 9.30pm.

Soulfire restaurant SGP by Amelia gregory

In the first yurt diners were treated to some live music, physician and out back we were seated in candlelit surroundings at a shared table, with walls decorated in contemporary art. The waiters were delightful, and from the incredibly reasonably priced £30 three course menu we were soon chomping on our starter choices of Uig Lodge Smoked Salmon Blinis with Sour Cream and Avruga Caviar, and a large portion of succulent Wild Mushroom Arancini with Rocket and Aioli.

katie-harnett-smokedsalmon
katie-harnett-mushroom arancini
Illustrations by Katie Harnett.

My only quibble with the menu was the lack of an obvious main vegetarian option (we had to ask for it) but in the end we all settled on the same dishes – French Freerange Guinea Fowl with Sweet Potato Dauphinoise and Greens. I am generally a vegetarian but will occasionally eat freerange and organic meat – and this just sounded too good to pass up.

Guinea_Fowl_Tigz_Rice
French Guinea Fowl by Tigz Rice.

“The Soul Fire menu has been deliberated over with the utmost love and attention to offer guests an exquisite choice of fine food to suit all palates,” states the press release for the restaurant, which served only ethically and locally sourced food. I can confirm that our guinea fowl was absolutely delicious, sentiments agreed on by my two dining partners as we enjoyed our meal with an accompanying bottle of wine.

Dee-Andrews-Soulfire-Restaurant-3Yurts-SGP-2010
Illustration by Dee Andrews.

For desert we chose Lemon Curd Cheesecake with Blueberry Sauce and a moistly rich Chocolate Brownie with Ice Cream, which were both superb and again arrived in very reasonably sized portions that would set us up nicely for a long night of partying.

Soul Fire Restaurant-Lisa-Stannard
Puddings by Lisa Stannard.

It may seem slightly strange to choose such a fabulous dining experience at a festival, but we returned to the madness outside refreshed, relaxed and fully sated.

On our travels later we overheard a punter passing the restaurant say “Best Eggs Benedict ever” to his companion. My only disappointment was that I was unable to sample the Soul Fire brunch experience for myself – by the time we made it back to the restaurant in the mornings it was always full already. It’s funny how news of a good thing will travel so fast.

I very much look forward to news of the next Soul Fire pop up restaurant in a yurt. This idea could grow and grow…

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2 Responses to “Secret Garden Party 2010: Soul Fire Restaurant Review”

  1. Aniela says:

    They really were the best eggs benedict. Ever.

  2. Amelia says:

    JEALOUS.

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