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Top 25 Art Blog - Creative Tourist

Scholl you believe it!

The more traditional footwear brand mixes things up for SS10 with great success.

Written by Siobhan Fagan

illustration by Brett Manning
illustration by Brett Manning

Anyone who has heard me lecture will be aware that I do like to bang on about what a great idea it is to produce your own fanzine: They’re cheap, pharm medicine flexible and mean you can spread yourself around easily. NO NO not like some slutty yoga fanatic – more like the best way eva to promote yourself if you’re an up and coming artist or writer. Plus, help a whole network of zine fairs has now grown up to support this most underground of art industries.

That point aside, I am a particular fan of zines that talk about Amelia’s Magazine and Amelia’s Anthology of Illustration. You scratch my back, I’ll scratch yours – you know how it goes. And of course the fact that the creators of such zines are interested in my work means that OBVIOUSLY they have good taste – goes without saying that they are worth talking about in return then.

cheapzine art nouveau book

Some aspects of zines also exist online because of course everyone must have an online presence, but as someone who is a massive fan of cold hard print, I think you can’t beat something which you can hold in your hands. So, it is with pleasure that I’d like to promote Cheapzine’s latest project, which sees them moving from the (okay, somewhat limited) world of photocopied zines into a four colour print book project, which chooses as its subject the influence of Art Noveau on contemporary art. This will collate best examples of this work alongside a collection of essays on the subject from Tommy, an art history obsessive, and artwork from current Cheapzine contributors such as Brett Manning (she’s a girl okay.) http://www.myspace.com/pynx1 who produces wonderfully detailed drawings.

“Until recently I’d kinda thought of Art Nouveau was just a nice little discourse in art history that died out with the rise of high Modernism, but this isn’t the case at all,” explains chief Cheapziner Tommy. “Most of the fashion illustrators that we like appear to take inspiration from artists such as Egon Schiele, Alphonse Mucha and Gustav Klimt.” He thinks that the influence of this particular period of design can be seen in everything: from high art, such as Chris Ofili’s Upper Room (currently the highlight at his Tate Britain solo show) to ‘lowbrow’ art, contemporary illustration, poster art, fashion design and even ‘business’ art.

“We decided to make the book cause we’ve been making the zine for a while now,” he continues, “and we’ve been working with some really cool people so we wanted to make something a bit nicer and more “proper” than the zine.” So far there have been nine issues of Cheapzine, with issue 10 in the pipeline as I write. Although there are now other projects on the go so this may be the last in awhile – how prophetic – I got up to ten issues as well! Tommy is hoping to publish about 500 copies of this limited edition book in A5 format sometime towards the end of summer. Essentially, whether you’re a photographer, illustrator or designer, this is an ideal place to get your work seen. The deadline is 31st March 2010, and all work should be sent to cheap-magazine@live.com
illustration by Brett Manning
illustration by Brett Manning

Anyone who has heard me lecture will be aware that I do like to bang on about what a great idea it is to produce your own fanzine: They’re cheap, this flexible and mean you can spread yourself around easily. NO NO not like some slutty yoga fanatic – more like the best way eva to promote yourself if you’re an up and coming artist or writer. Plus, a whole network of zine fairs has now grown up to support this most underground of art industries.

That point aside, I am a particular fan of zines that talk about Amelia’s Magazine and Amelia’s Anthology of Illustration. You scratch my back, I’ll scratch yours – you know how it goes. And of course the fact that the creators of such zines are interested in my work means that OBVIOUSLY they have good taste – goes without saying that they are worth talking about in return then.

cheapzine art nouveau book

Some aspects of zines also exist online because of course everyone must have an online presence, but as someone who is a massive fan of cold hard print, I think you can’t beat something which you can hold in your hands. So, it is with pleasure that I’d like to promote Cheapzine’s latest project, which sees them moving from the (okay, somewhat limited) world of photocopied zines into a four colour print book project, which chooses as its subject the influence of Art Noveau on contemporary art. This will collate best examples of this work alongside a collection of essays on the subject from Tommy, an art history obsessive, and artwork from current Cheapzine contributors such as Brett Manning (she’s a girl okay.) http://www.myspace.com/pynx1 who produces wonderfully detailed drawings.

“Until recently I’d kinda thought of Art Nouveau was just a nice little discourse in art history that died out with the rise of high Modernism, but this isn’t the case at all,” explains chief Cheapziner Tommy. “Most of the fashion illustrators that we like appear to take inspiration from artists such as Egon Schiele, Alphonse Mucha and Gustav Klimt.” He thinks that the influence of this particular period of design can be seen in everything: from high art, such as Chris Ofili’s Upper Room (currently the highlight at his Tate Britain solo show) to ‘lowbrow’ art, contemporary illustration, poster art, fashion design and even ‘business’ art.

“We decided to make the book cause we’ve been making the zine for a while now,” he continues, “and we’ve been working with some really cool people so we wanted to make something a bit nicer and more “proper” than the zine.” So far there have been nine issues of Cheapzine, with issue 10 in the pipeline as I write. Although there are now other projects on the go so this may be the last in awhile – how prophetic – I got up to ten issues as well! Tommy is hoping to publish about 500 copies of this limited edition book in A5 format sometime towards the end of summer. Essentially, whether you’re a photographer, illustrator or designer, this is an ideal place to get your work seen. The deadline is 31st March 2010, and all work should be sent to cheap-magazine@live.com
illustration by Brett Manning
illustration by Brett Manning

Anyone who has heard me lecture will be aware that I do like to bang on about what a great idea it is to produce your own fanzine: They’re cheap, hospital flexible and mean you can spread yourself around easily. NO NO not like some slutty yoga fanatic – more like the best way eva to promote yourself if you’re an up and coming artist or writer. Plus, a whole network of zine fairs has now grown up to support this most underground of art industries.

That point aside, I am a particular fan of zines that talk about Amelia’s Magazine and Amelia’s Anthology of Illustration. You scratch my back, I’ll scratch yours – you know how it goes. And of course the fact that the creators of such zines are interested in my work means that OBVIOUSLY they have good taste – goes without saying that they are worth talking about in return then.

cheapzine art nouveau book

Some aspects of zines also exist online because of course everyone must have an online presence, but as someone who is a massive fan of cold hard print, I think you can’t beat something which you can hold in your hands. So, it is with pleasure that I’d like to promote Cheapzine’s latest project, which sees them moving from the (okay, somewhat limited) world of photocopied zines into a four colour print book project, which chooses as its subject the influence of Art Noveau on contemporary art. This will collate best examples of this work alongside a collection of essays on the subject from Tommy, an art history obsessive, and artwork from current Cheapzine contributors such as Brett Manning (she’s a girl okay.) http://www.myspace.com/pynx1 who produces wonderfully detailed drawings.

“Until recently I’d kinda thought of Art Nouveau was just a nice little discourse in art history that died out with the rise of high Modernism, but this isn’t the case at all,” explains chief Cheapziner Tommy. “Most of the fashion illustrators that we like appear to take inspiration from artists such as Egon Schiele, Alphonse Mucha and Gustav Klimt.” He thinks that the influence of this particular period of design can be seen in everything: from high art, such as Chris Ofili’s Upper Room (currently the highlight at his Tate Britain solo show) to ‘lowbrow’ art, contemporary illustration, poster art, fashion design and even ‘business’ art.

“We decided to make the book cause we’ve been making the zine for a while now,” he continues, “and we’ve been working with some really cool people so we wanted to make something a bit nicer and more “proper” than the zine.” So far there have been nine issues of Cheapzine, with issue 10 in the pipeline as I write. Although there are now other projects on the go so this may be the last in awhile – how prophetic – I got up to ten issues as well! Tommy is hoping to publish about 500 copies of this limited edition book in A5 format sometime towards the end of summer. Essentially, whether you’re a photographer, illustrator or designer, this is an ideal place to get your work seen. The deadline is 31st March 2010, and all work should be sent to cheap-magazine@live.com
illustration by Brett Manning
illustration by Brett Manning

Anyone who has heard me lecture will be aware that I do like to bang on about what a great idea it is to produce your own fanzine: They’re cheap, abortion flexible and mean you can spread yourself around easily. NO NO not like some slutty yoga fanatic – more like the best way eva to promote yourself if you’re an up and coming artist or writer. Plus, a whole network of zine fairs has now grown up to support this most underground of art industries.

That point aside, I am a particular fan of zines that talk about Amelia’s Magazine and Amelia’s Anthology of Illustration. You scratch my back, I’ll scratch yours – you know how it goes. And of course the fact that the creators of such zines are interested in my work means that OBVIOUSLY they have good taste – goes without saying that they are worth talking about in return then.

cheapzine art nouveau book

Some aspects of zines also exist online because of course everyone must have an online presence, but as someone who is a massive fan of cold hard print, I think you can’t beat something which you can hold in your hands. So, it is with pleasure that I’d like to promote Cheapzine’s latest project, which sees them moving from the (okay, somewhat limited) world of photocopied zines into a four colour print book project, which chooses as its subject the influence of Art Noveau on contemporary art. This will collate best examples of this work alongside a collection of essays on the subject from Tommy, an art history obsessive, and artwork from current Cheapzine contributors such as Brett Manning who is featured above (she’s a girl okay.) who produces wonderfully detailed drawings.

“Until recently I’d kinda thought of Art Nouveau was just a nice little discourse in art history that died out with the rise of high Modernism, but this isn’t the case at all,” explains chief Cheapziner Tommy. “Most of the fashion illustrators that we like appear to take inspiration from artists such as Egon Schiele, Alphonse Mucha and Gustav Klimt.” He thinks that the influence of this particular period of design can be seen in everything: from high art, such as Chris Ofili’s Upper Room (currently the highlight at his Tate Britain solo show) to ‘lowbrow’ art, contemporary illustration, poster art, fashion design and even ‘business’ art.

“We decided to make the book cause we’ve been making the zine for a while now,” he continues, “and we’ve been working with some really cool people so we wanted to make something a bit nicer and more “proper” than the zine.” So far there have been nine issues of Cheapzine, with issue 10 in the pipeline as I write. Although there are now other projects on the go so this may be the last in awhile – how prophetic – I got up to ten issues as well! Tommy is hoping to publish about 500 copies of this limited edition book in A5 format sometime towards the end of summer. Essentially, whether you’re a photographer, illustrator or designer, this is an ideal place to get your work seen. The deadline is 31st March 2010, and all work should be sent to cheap-magazine@live.com
illustration by Brett Manning
illustration by Brett Manning

Anyone who has heard me lecture will be aware that I do like to bang on about what a great idea it is to produce your own fanzine: They’re cheap, sick flexible and mean you can spread yourself around easily. NO NO not like some slutty yoga fanatic – more like the best way eva to promote yourself if you’re an up and coming artist or writer. Plus, a whole network of zine fairs has now grown up to support this most underground of art industries.

That point aside, I am a particular fan of zines that talk about Amelia’s Magazine and Amelia’s Anthology of Illustration. You scratch my back, I’ll scratch yours – you know how it goes. And of course the fact that the creators of such zines are interested in my work means that OBVIOUSLY they have good taste – goes without saying that they are worth talking about in return then.

cheapzine art nouveau book

Some aspects of zines also exist online because of course everyone must have an online presence, but as someone who is a massive fan of cold hard print, I think you can’t beat something which you can hold in your hands. So, it is with pleasure that I’d like to promote Cheapzine’s latest project, which sees them moving from the (okay, somewhat limited) world of photocopied zines into a four colour print book project, which chooses as its subject the influence of Art Noveau on contemporary art. This will collate best examples of this work alongside a collection of essays on the subject from Tommy, an art history obsessive, and artwork from current Cheapzine contributors such as Brett Manning who is featured above (she’s a girl okay.) who produces wonderfully detailed drawings.

“Until recently I’d kinda thought of Art Nouveau was just a nice little discourse in art history that died out with the rise of high Modernism, but this isn’t the case at all,” explains chief Cheapziner Tommy. “Most of the fashion illustrators that we like appear to take inspiration from artists such as Egon Schiele, Alphonse Mucha and Gustav Klimt.” He thinks that the influence of this particular period of design can be seen in everything: from high art, such as Chris Ofili’s Upper Room (currently the highlight at his Tate Britain solo show) to ‘lowbrow’ art, contemporary illustration, poster art, fashion design and even ‘business’ art.

“We decided to make the book cause we’ve been making the zine for a while now,” he continues, “and we’ve been working with some really cool people so we wanted to make something a bit nicer and more “proper” than the zine.” So far there have been nine issues of Cheapzine, with issue 10 in the pipeline as I write. Although there are now other projects on the go so this may be the last in awhile – how prophetic – I got up to ten issues as well! Tommy is hoping to publish about 500 copies of this limited edition book in A5 format sometime towards the end of summer. Essentially, whether you’re a photographer, illustrator or designer, this is an ideal place to get your work seen. The deadline is 31st March 2010, and all work should be sent to cheap-magazine@live.com
illustration by Brett Manning
illustration by Brett Manning

Anyone who has heard me lecture will be aware that I do like to bang on about what a great idea it is to produce your own fanzine: They’re cheap, mind flexible and mean you can spread yourself around easily. NO NO not like some slutty yoga fanatic – more like the best way eva to promote yourself if you’re an up and coming artist or writer. Plus, link a whole network of zine fairs has now grown up to support this most underground of art industries.

That point aside, viagra buy I am a particular fan of zines that talk about Amelia’s Magazine and Amelia’s Anthology of Illustration. You scratch my back, I’ll scratch yours – you know how it goes. And of course the fact that the creators of such zines are interested in my work means that OBVIOUSLY they have good taste – goes without saying that they are worth talking about in return then.

cheapzine art nouveau book

Some aspects of zines also exist online because of course everyone must have an online presence, but as someone who is a massive fan of cold hard print, I think you can’t beat something which you can hold in your hands. So, it is with pleasure that I’d like to promote Cheapzine’s latest project, which sees them moving from the (okay, somewhat limited) world of photocopied zines into a four colour print book project, which chooses as its subject the influence of Art Nouveau on contemporary art. This will collate best examples of this work alongside a collection of essays on the subject from Tommy, an art history obsessive, and artwork from current Cheapzine contributors such as Brett Manning who is featured above (she’s a girl okay.) who produces wonderfully detailed drawings.

“Until recently I’d kinda thought of Art Nouveau was just a nice little discourse in art history that died out with the rise of high Modernism, but this isn’t the case at all,” explains chief Cheapziner Tommy. “Most of the fashion illustrators that we like appear to take inspiration from artists such as Egon Schiele, Alphonse Mucha and Gustav Klimt.” He thinks that the influence of this particular period of design can be seen in everything: from high art, such as Chris Ofili’s Upper Room (currently the highlight at his Tate Britain solo show) to ‘lowbrow’ art, contemporary illustration, poster art, fashion design and even ‘business’ art.

“We decided to make the book cause we’ve been making the zine for a while now,” he continues, “and we’ve been working with some really cool people so we wanted to make something a bit nicer and more “proper” than the zine.” So far there have been nine issues of Cheapzine, with issue 10 in the pipeline as I write. Although there are now other projects on the go so this may be the last in awhile – how prophetic – I got up to ten issues as well! Tommy is hoping to publish about 500 copies of this limited edition book in A5 format sometime towards the end of summer. Essentially, whether you’re a photographer, illustrator or designer, this is an ideal place to get your work seen. The deadline is 31st March 2010, and all work should be sent to cheap-magazine@live.com
illustration by Brett Manning
illustration by Brett Manning

Anyone who has heard me lecture will be aware that I do like to bang on about what a great idea it is to produce your own fanzine: They’re cheap, approved flexible and mean you can spread yourself around easily. NO NO not like some slutty yoga fanatic – more like the best way eva to promote yourself if you’re an up and coming artist or writer. Plus, viagra order a whole network of zine fairs has now grown up to support this most underground of art industries.

That point aside, salve I am a particular fan of zines that talk about Amelia’s Magazine and Amelia’s Anthology of Illustration. You scratch my back, I’ll scratch yours – you know how it goes. And of course the fact that the creators of such zines are interested in my work means that OBVIOUSLY they have good taste – goes without saying that they are worth talking about in return then.

cheapzine art nouveau book

Some aspects of zines also exist online because of course everyone must have an online presence, but as someone who is a massive fan of cold hard print, I think you can’t beat something which you can hold in your hands. So, it is with pleasure that I’d like to promote Cheapzine’s latest project, which sees them moving from the (okay, somewhat limited) world of photocopied zines into a four colour print book project, which chooses as its subject the influence of Art Nouveau on contemporary art. This will collate best examples of this work alongside a collection of essays on the subject from Tommy, an art history obsessive, and artwork from current Cheapzine contributors such as Brett Manning who is featured above (she’s a girl okay.) who produces wonderfully detailed drawings.

“Until recently I’d kinda thought of Art Nouveau was just a nice little discourse in art history that died out with the rise of high Modernism, but this isn’t the case at all,” explains chief Cheapziner Tommy. “Most of the fashion illustrators that we like appear to take inspiration from artists such as Egon Schiele, Alphonse Mucha and Gustav Klimt.” He thinks that the influence of this particular period of design can be seen in everything: from high art, such as Chris Ofili’s Upper Room (currently the highlight at his Tate Britain solo show) to ‘lowbrow’ art, contemporary illustration, poster art, fashion design and even ‘business’ art.

“We decided to make the book cause we’ve been making the zine for a while now,” he continues, “and we’ve been working with some really cool people so we wanted to make something a bit nicer and more “proper” than the zine.” So far there have been nine issues of Cheapzine, with issue 10 in the pipeline as I write. Although there are now other projects on the go so this may be the last in awhile – how prophetic – I got up to ten issues as well! Tommy is hoping to publish about 500 copies of this limited edition book in A5 format sometime towards the end of summer. Essentially, whether you’re a photographer, illustrator or designer, this is an ideal place to get your work seen. The deadline is 31st March 2010, and all work should be sent to cheap-magazine@live.com
illustration by Brett Manning
illustration by Brett Manning

Anyone who has heard me lecture will be aware that I do like to bang on about what a great idea it is to produce your own fanzine: they’re cheap, viagra 40mg flexible and mean you can spread yourself around easily. NO NO not like some slutty yoga fanatic – more like the best way eva to promote yourself if you’re an up and coming artist or writer. Plus, order a whole network of zine fairs has now grown up to support this most underground of art industries.

That point aside, I am a particular fan of zines that talk about Amelia’s Magazine and Amelia’s Anthology of Illustration. You scratch my back, I’ll scratch yours – you know how it goes. And of course the fact that the creators of such zines are interested in my work means that OBVIOUSLY they have good taste – goes without saying that they are worth talking about in return then.

cheapzine art nouveau book

Some aspects of zines exist online because of course one cannot exist without an webtastic presence these days, but as someone who is a massive fan of cold hard print, I believe you still can’t beat something which you can actually hold in your hands. So, it is with pleasure that I’d like to promote Cheapzine’s latest project, which sees them moving from the (okay, somewhat limited) world of photocopied zines and blog posts into a four colour print book project, choosing as the subject the influence of Art Nouveau on contemporary art. This A5 book will collate best examples of such work alongside a collection of essays on the subject from Tommy Eugene Higson – a self-confessed art history obsessive – and artwork from current Cheapzine contributors such as Brett Manning who is featured above (she’s a girl okay), purveyor of wonderfully detailed drawings.

“Until recently I’d kinda thought of Art Nouveau was just a nice little discourse in art history that died out with the rise of high Modernism, but this isn’t the case at all,” explains chief Cheapziner Tommy. “Most of the fashion illustrators that we like appear to take inspiration from artists such as Egon Schiele, Alphonse Mucha and Gustav Klimt.” He thinks that the influence of this particular period of design can be seen in everything: from high art, such as Chris Ofili’s Upper Room (currently the highlight at his Tate Britain solo show) to ‘lowbrow’ art, contemporary illustration, poster art, fashion design and even ‘business’ art.

“We decided to make the book cause we’ve been making the zine for a while now,” he continues, “and we’ve been working with some really cool people so we wanted to make something a bit nicer and more “proper” than the zine.” So far Tommy and his cohort Nikki Marie have produced nine issues of Cheapzine, with issue 10 in the pipeline which may be the last for the time being due to their new projects. Just like Amelia’s Magazine, it seems that 10, not 3, really is the magic number.

Tommy is hoping to publish 500 copies of this limited edition book sometime towards the end of summer. Whether you’re a photographer, illustrator or designer, this will be an ideal place to get your work seen, and who doesn’t love a bit of Art Nouveou, really?! The deadline is 31st March 2010, and all work should be sent to cheap-magazine@live.com
illustration by Brett Manning
illustration by Brett Manning

Anyone who has heard me lecture will be aware that I do like to bang on about what a great idea it is to produce your own fanzine: they’re cheap, buy information pills flexible and mean you can spread yourself around easily. NO NO not like some slutty yoga fanatic – more like the best way eva to promote yourself if you’re an up and coming artist or writer. Plus, web a whole network of zine fairs has now grown up to support this most underground of art industries.

That point aside, I am a particular fan of zines that talk about Amelia’s Magazine and Amelia’s Anthology of Illustration. You scratch my back, I’ll scratch yours – you know how it goes. And of course the fact that the creators of such zines are interested in my work means that OBVIOUSLY they have good taste – goes without saying that they are worth talking about in return then.

cheapzine art nouveau book

Some aspects of zines exist online because of course one cannot exist without an webtastic presence these days, but as someone who is a massive fan of cold hard print, I believe you still can’t beat something which you can actually hold in your hands. So, it is with pleasure that I’d like to promote Cheapzine’s latest project, which sees them moving from the (okay, somewhat limited) world of photocopied zines and blog posts into a four colour print book project, choosing as the subject the influence of Art Nouveau on contemporary art. This A5 book will collate best examples of such work alongside a collection of essays on the subject from Tommy Eugene Higson – a self-confessed art history obsessive – and artwork from current Cheapzine contributors such as Brett Manning who is featured above (she’s a girl okay), purveyor of wonderfully detailed drawings.

“Until recently I’d kinda thought of Art Nouveau was just a nice little discourse in art history that died out with the rise of high Modernism, but this isn’t the case at all,” explains chief Cheapziner Tommy. “Most of the fashion illustrators that we like appear to take inspiration from artists such as Egon Schiele, Alphonse Mucha and Gustav Klimt.” He thinks that the influence of this particular period of design can be seen in everything: from high art, such as Chris Ofili’s Upper Room (currently the highlight at his Tate Britain solo show) to ‘lowbrow’ art, contemporary illustration, poster art, fashion design and even ‘business’ art.

“We decided to make the book cause we’ve been making the zine for a while now,” he continues, “and we’ve been working with some really cool people so we wanted to make something a bit nicer and more “proper” than the zine.” So far Tommy and his cohort Nikki Marie have produced nine issues of Cheapzine, with issue 10 in the pipeline which may be the last for the time being due to their new projects. Just like Amelia’s Magazine, it seems that 10, not 3, really is the magic number.

Tommy is hoping to publish 500 copies of this limited edition book sometime towards the end of summer. Whether you’re a photographer, illustrator or designer, this will be an ideal place to get your work seen, and who doesn’t love a bit of Art Nouveou, really?! The deadline is 31st March 2010, and all work should be sent to cheap-magazine@live.com
illustration by Brett Manning
illustration by Brett Manning

Anyone who has heard me lecture will be aware that I do like to bang on about what a great idea it is to produce your own fanzine: they’re cheap, treat flexible and mean you can spread yourself around easily. NO NO not like some slutty yoga fanatic – more like the best way eva to promote yourself if you’re an up and coming artist or writer. Plus, sales a whole network of zine fairs has now grown up to support this most underground of art industries.

That point aside, store I am a particular fan of zines that talk about Amelia’s Magazine and Amelia’s Anthology of Illustration. You scratch my back, I’ll scratch yours – you know how it goes. And of course the fact that the creators of such zines are interested in my work means that OBVIOUSLY they have good taste – goes without saying that they are worth talking about in return then.

cheapzine art nouveau book

Some aspects of zines exist online because of course one cannot exist without an webtastic presence these days, but as someone who is a massive fan of cold hard print, I believe you still can’t beat something which you can actually hold in your hands. So, it is with pleasure that I’d like to promote Cheapzine’s latest project, which sees them moving from the (okay, somewhat limited) world of photocopied zines and blog posts into a four colour print book project, choosing as the subject the influence of Art Nouveau on contemporary art. This A5 book will collate best examples of such work alongside a collection of essays on the subject from Tommy Eugene Higson – a self-confessed art history obsessive – and artwork from current Cheapzine contributors such as Brett Manning who is featured above (she’s a girl okay), purveyor of wonderfully detailed drawings.

“Until recently I’d kinda thought of Art Nouveau was just a nice little discourse in art history that died out with the rise of high Modernism, but this isn’t the case at all,” explains chief Cheapziner Tommy. “Most of the fashion illustrators that we like appear to take inspiration from artists such as Egon Schiele, Alphonse Mucha and Gustav Klimt.” He thinks that the influence of this particular period of design can be seen in everything: from high art, such as Chris Ofili’s Upper Room (currently the highlight at his Tate Britain solo show) to ‘lowbrow’ art, contemporary illustration, poster art, fashion design and even ‘business’ art.

“We decided to make the book cause we’ve been making the zine for a while now,” he continues, “and we’ve been working with some really cool people so we wanted to make something a bit nicer and more “proper” than the zine.” So far Tommy and his cohort Nikki Marie have produced nine issues of Cheapzine, with issue 10 in the pipeline which may be the last for the time being due to their new projects. Just like Amelia’s Magazine, it seems that 10, not 3, really is the magic number.

Tommy is hoping to publish 500 copies of this limited edition book sometime towards the end of summer. Whether you’re a photographer, illustrator or designer, this will be an ideal place to get your work seen, and who doesn’t love a bit of Art Nouveou, really?! The deadline is 31st March 2010, and all work should be sent to cheap-magazine@live.com
illustration by Brett Manning
illustration by Brett Manning

Anyone who has heard me lecture will be aware that I do like to bang on about what a great idea it is to produce your own fanzine: they’re cheap, medicine flexible and mean you can spread yourself around easily. NO NO not like some slutty yoga fanatic – more like the best way eva to promote yourself if you’re an up and coming artist or writer. Plus, dosage a whole network of zine fairs has now grown up to support this most underground of art industries.

That point aside, I am a particular fan of zines that talk about Amelia’s Magazine and Amelia’s Anthology of Illustration. You scratch my back, I’ll scratch yours – you know how it goes. And of course the fact that the creators of such zines are interested in my work means that OBVIOUSLY they have good taste – goes without saying that they are worth talking about in return then.

cheapzine art nouveau book

Some aspects of zines exist online because of course one cannot exist without an webtastic presence these days, but as someone who is a massive fan of cold hard print, I believe you still can’t beat something which you can actually hold in your hands. So, it is with pleasure that I’d like to promote Cheapzine’s latest project, which sees them moving from the (okay, somewhat limited) world of photocopied zines and blog posts into a four colour print book project, choosing as the subject the influence of Art Nouveau on contemporary art. This A5 book will collate best examples of such work alongside a collection of essays on the subject from Tommy Eugene Higson – a self-confessed art history obsessive – and artwork from current Cheapzine contributors such as Brett Manning who is featured above (she’s a girl okay), purveyor of wonderfully detailed drawings.

“Until recently I’d kinda thought of Art Nouveau was just a nice little discourse in art history that died out with the rise of high Modernism, but this isn’t the case at all,” explains chief Cheapziner Tommy. “Most of the fashion illustrators that we like appear to take inspiration from artists such as Egon Schiele, Alphonse Mucha and Gustav Klimt.” He thinks that the influence of this particular period of design can be seen in everything: from high art, such as Chris Ofili’s Upper Room (currently the highlight at his Tate Britain solo show) to ‘lowbrow’ art, contemporary illustration, poster art, fashion design and even ‘business’ art.

“We decided to make the book cause we’ve been making the zine for a while now,” he continues, “and we’ve been working with some really cool people so we wanted to make something a bit nicer and more “proper” than the zine.” So far Tommy and his cohort Nikki Marie have produced nine issues of Cheapzine, with issue 10 in the pipeline which may be the last for the time being due to their new projects. Just like Amelia’s Magazine, it seems that 10, not 3, really is the magic number.

Tommy is hoping to publish 500 copies of this limited edition book sometime towards the end of summer. Whether you’re a photographer, illustrator or designer, this will be an ideal place to get your work seen, and who doesn’t love a bit of Art Nouveou, really?! The deadline is 31st March 2010, and all work should be sent to cheap-magazine@live.com
illustration by Brett Manning
illustration by Brett Manning

Anyone who has heard me lecture will be aware that I do like to bang on about what a great idea it is to produce your own fanzine: they’re cheap, pill flexible and mean you can spread yourself around easily. NO NO not like some slutty yoga fanatic – more like the best way eva to promote yourself if you’re an up and coming artist or writer. Plus, more about a whole network of zine fairs has now grown up to support this most underground of art industries.

That point aside, tadalafil I am a particular fan of zines that talk about Amelia’s Magazine and Amelia’s Anthology of Illustration. You scratch my back, I’ll scratch yours – you know how it goes. And of course the fact that the creators of such zines are interested in my work means that OBVIOUSLY they have good taste – goes without saying that they are worth talking about in return then.

cheapzine art nouveau book

Some aspects of zines exist online because of course one cannot exist without an webtastic presence these days, but as someone who is a massive fan of cold hard print, I believe you still can’t beat something which you can actually hold in your hands. So, it is with pleasure that I’d like to promote Cheapzine’s latest project, which sees them moving from the (okay, somewhat limited) world of photocopied zines and blog posts into a four colour print book project, choosing as the subject the influence of Art Nouveau on contemporary art. This A5 book will collate best examples of such work alongside a collection of essays on the subject from Tommy Eugene Higson – a self-confessed art history obsessive – and artwork from current Cheapzine contributors such as Brett Manning who is featured above (she’s a girl okay), purveyor of wonderfully detailed drawings.

“Until recently I’d kinda thought of Art Nouveau was just a nice little discourse in art history that died out with the rise of high Modernism, but this isn’t the case at all,” explains chief Cheapziner Tommy. “Most of the fashion illustrators that we like appear to take inspiration from artists such as Egon Schiele, Alphonse Mucha and Gustav Klimt.” He thinks that the influence of this particular period of design can be seen in everything: from high art, such as Chris Ofili’s Upper Room (currently the highlight at his Tate Britain solo show) to ‘lowbrow’ art, contemporary illustration, poster art, fashion design and even ‘business’ art.

“We decided to make the book cause we’ve been making the zine for a while now,” he continues, “and we’ve been working with some really cool people so we wanted to make something a bit nicer and more “proper” than the zine.” So far Tommy and his cohort Nikki Marie have produced nine issues of Cheapzine, with issue 10 in the pipeline which may be the last for the time being due to their new projects. Just like Amelia’s Magazine, it seems that 10, not 3, really is the magic number.

Tommy is hoping to publish 500 copies of this limited edition book sometime towards the end of summer. Whether you’re a photographer, illustrator or designer, this will be an ideal place to get your work seen, and who doesn’t love a bit of Art Nouveou, really?! The deadline is 31st March 2010, and all work should be sent to cheap-magazine@live.com
illustration by Brett Manning
illustration by Brett Manning

Anyone who has heard me lecture will be aware that I do like to bang on about what a great idea it is to produce your own fanzine: they’re cheap, stuff flexible and mean you can spread yourself around easily. NO NO not like some slutty yoga fanatic – more like the best way eva to promote yourself if you’re an up and coming artist or writer. Plus, order a whole network of zine fairs has now grown up to support this most underground of art industries.

That point aside, I am a particular fan of zines that talk about Amelia’s Magazine and Amelia’s Anthology of Illustration. You scratch my back, I’ll scratch yours – you know how it goes. And of course the fact that the creators of such zines are interested in my work means that OBVIOUSLY they have good taste – goes without saying that they are worth talking about in return then.

cheapzine art nouveau book

Some aspects of zines exist online because of course one cannot exist without an webtastic presence these days, but as someone who is a massive fan of cold hard print, I believe you still can’t beat something which you can actually hold in your hands. So, it is with pleasure that I’d like to promote Cheapzine’s latest project, which sees them moving from the (okay, somewhat limited) world of photocopied zines and blog posts into a four colour print book project, choosing as the subject the influence of Art Nouveau on contemporary art. This A5 book will collate best examples of such work alongside a collection of essays on the subject from Tommy Eugene Higson – a self-confessed art history obsessive – and artwork from current Cheapzine contributors such as Brett Manning who is featured above (she’s a girl okay), purveyor of wonderfully detailed drawings.

“Until recently I’d kinda thought of Art Nouveau was just a nice little discourse in art history that died out with the rise of high Modernism, but this isn’t the case at all,” explains chief Cheapziner Tommy. “Most of the fashion illustrators that we like appear to take inspiration from artists such as Egon Schiele, Alphonse Mucha and Gustav Klimt.” He thinks that the influence of this particular period of design can be seen in everything: from high art, such as Chris Ofili’s Upper Room (currently the highlight at his Tate Britain solo show) to ‘lowbrow’ art, contemporary illustration, poster art, fashion design and even ‘business’ art.

“We decided to make the book cause we’ve been making the zine for a while now,” he continues, “and we’ve been working with some really cool people so we wanted to make something a bit nicer and more “proper” than the zine.” So far Tommy and his cohort Nikki Marie have produced nine issues of Cheapzine, with issue 10 in the pipeline which may be the last for the time being due to their new projects. Just like Amelia’s Magazine, it seems that 10, not 3, really is the magic number.

Tommy is hoping to publish 500 copies of this limited edition book sometime towards the end of summer. Whether you’re a photographer, illustrator or designer, this will be an ideal place to get your work seen, and who doesn’t love a bit of Art Nouveou, really?! The deadline is 31st March 2010, and all work should be sent to cheap-magazine@live.com
illustration by Brett Manning
illustration by Brett Manning

Anyone who has heard me lecture will be aware that I do like to bang on about what a great idea it is to produce your own fanzine: they’re cheap, what is ed flexible and mean you can spread yourself around easily. NO NO not like some slutty yoga fanatic – more like the best way eva to promote yourself if you’re an up and coming artist or writer. Plus, medical a whole network of zine fairs has now grown up to support this most underground of art industries.

That point aside, information pills I am a particular fan of zines that talk about Amelia’s Magazine and Amelia’s Anthology of Illustration. You scratch my back, I’ll scratch yours – you know how it goes. And of course the fact that the creators of such zines are interested in my work means that OBVIOUSLY they have good taste – goes without saying that they are worth talking about in return then.

cheapzine art nouveau book

Some aspects of zines exist online because of course one cannot exist without a webtastic presence these days, but as someone who is a massive fan of cold hard print, I believe you still can’t beat something which you can actually hold in your hands. So, it is with pleasure that I’d like to promote Cheapzine’s latest project, which sees them moving from the (okay, somewhat limited) world of photocopied zines and blog posts into a four colour print book project, choosing as its subject the influence of Art Nouveau on contemporary art. This A5 book will collate the best examples of such work alongside a collection of essays on the subject from Tommy Eugene Higson – a self-confessed art history obsessive – and artwork from current Cheapzine contributors such as Brett Manning whose work is featured above (she’s a girl okay), purveyor of wonderfully detailed drawings.

“Until recently I’d kinda thought of Art Nouveau was just a nice little discourse in art history that died out with the rise of high Modernism, but this isn’t the case at all,” explains chief Cheapziner Tommy. “Most of the fashion illustrators that we like appear to take inspiration from artists such as Egon Schiele, Alphonse Mucha and Gustav Klimt.” He thinks that the influence of this particular period of design can be seen in everything: from high art, such as Chris Ofili’s Upper Room (currently the highlight at his Tate Britain solo show) to ‘lowbrow’ art, contemporary illustration, poster art, fashion design and even ‘business’ art.

“We decided to make the book cause we’ve been making the zine for a while now,” he continues, “and we’ve been working with some really cool people so we wanted to make something a bit nicer and more ‘proper’ than the zine.” So far Tommy and his cohort Nikki Marie have produced nine issues of Cheapzine, with issue 10 likely to be the last for the time being due to their new projects. Just like Amelia’s Magazine, it seems that 10, not 3, really is the magic number.

Tommy is hoping to publish 500 copies of this limited edition book sometime towards the end of summer. Whether you’re a photographer, illustrator or designer, this will be an ideal place to get your work seen, and who doesn’t love a bit of Art Nouveou, really? The deadline is 31st March 2010, all work should be sent to cheap-magazine@live.com and let me know how you get along too.
illustration by Brett Manning
illustration by Brett Manning

Anyone who has heard me lecture will be aware that I do like to bang on about what a great idea it is to produce your own fanzine: they’re cheap, viagra sale flexible and mean you can spread yourself around easily. NO NO not like some slutty yoga fanatic – more like the best way eva to promote yourself if you’re an up and coming artist or writer. Plus, a whole network of zine fairs has now grown up to support this most underground of art industries.

That point aside, I am a particular fan of zines that talk about Amelia’s Magazine and Amelia’s Anthology of Illustration. You scratch my back, I’ll scratch yours – you know how it goes. And of course the fact that the creators of such zines are interested in my work means that OBVIOUSLY they have good taste – goes without saying that they are worth talking about in return then.

cheapzine art nouveau book

Some aspects of zines exist online because of course one cannot exist without a webtastic presence these days, but as someone who is a massive fan of cold hard print, I believe you still can’t beat something which you can actually hold in your hands. So, it is with pleasure that I’d like to promote Cheapzine’s latest project, which sees them moving from the (okay, somewhat limited) world of photocopied zines and blog posts into a four colour print book project, choosing as its subject the influence of Art Nouveau on contemporary art. This A5 book will collate the best examples of such work alongside a collection of essays on the subject from Tommy Eugene Higson – a self-confessed art history obsessive – and artwork from current Cheapzine contributors such as Brett Manning whose work is featured above (she’s a girl okay), purveyor of wonderfully detailed drawings.

“Until recently I’d kinda thought of Art Nouveau was just a nice little discourse in art history that died out with the rise of high Modernism, but this isn’t the case at all,” explains chief Cheapziner Tommy. “Most of the fashion illustrators that we like appear to take inspiration from artists such as Egon Schiele, Alphonse Mucha and Gustav Klimt.” He thinks that the influence of this particular period of design can be seen in everything: from high art, such as Chris Ofili’s Upper Room (currently the highlight at his Tate Britain solo show) to ‘lowbrow’ art, contemporary illustration, poster art, fashion design and even ‘business’ art.

“We decided to make the book cause we’ve been making the zine for a while now,” he continues, “and we’ve been working with some really cool people so we wanted to make something a bit nicer and more ‘proper’ than the zine.” So far Tommy and his cohort Nikki Marie have produced nine issues of Cheapzine, with issue 10 likely to be the last for the time being due to their new projects. Just like Amelia’s Magazine, it seems that 10, not 3, really is the magic number.

Tommy is hoping to publish 500 copies of this limited edition book sometime towards the end of summer. Whether you’re a photographer, illustrator or designer, this will be an ideal place to get your work seen, and who doesn’t love a bit of Art Nouveou, really? The deadline is 31st March 2010, all work should be sent to cheap-magazine@live.com and let me know how you get along too.
illustration by Brett Manning
illustration by Brett Manning

Anyone who has heard me lecture will be aware that I do like to bang on about what a great idea it is to produce your own fanzine: they’re cheap, more about flexible and mean you can spread yourself around easily. NO NO not like some slutty yoga fanatic – more like the best way eva to promote yourself if you’re an up and coming artist or writer. Plus, more about a whole network of zine fairs has now grown up to support this most underground of art industries.

That point aside, adiposity I am a particular fan of zines that talk about Amelia’s Magazine and Amelia’s Anthology of Illustration. You scratch my back, I’ll scratch yours – you know how it goes. And of course the fact that the creators of such zines are interested in my work means that OBVIOUSLY they have good taste – goes without saying that they are worth talking about in return then.

cheapzine art nouveau book

Some aspects of zines exist online because of course one cannot exist without a webtastic presence these days, but as someone who is a massive fan of cold hard print, I believe you still can’t beat something which you can actually hold in your hands. So, it is with pleasure that I’d like to promote Cheapzine’s latest project, which sees them moving from the (okay, somewhat limited) world of photocopied zines and blog posts into a four colour print book project, choosing as its subject the influence of Art Nouveau on contemporary art. This A5 book will collate the best examples of such work alongside a collection of essays on the subject from Tommy Eugene Higson – a self-confessed art history obsessive – and artwork from current Cheapzine contributors such as Brett Manning whose work is featured above (she’s a girl okay), purveyor of wonderfully detailed drawings.

“Until recently I’d kinda thought of Art Nouveau was just a nice little discourse in art history that died out with the rise of high Modernism, but this isn’t the case at all,” explains chief Cheapziner Tommy. “Most of the fashion illustrators that we like appear to take inspiration from artists such as Egon Schiele, Alphonse Mucha and Gustav Klimt.” He thinks that the influence of this particular period of design can be seen in everything: from high art, such as Chris Ofili’s Upper Room (currently the highlight at his Tate Britain solo show) to ‘lowbrow’ art, contemporary illustration, poster art, fashion design and even ‘business’ art.

“We decided to make the book cause we’ve been making the zine for a while now,” he continues, “and we’ve been working with some really cool people so we wanted to make something a bit nicer and more ‘proper’ than the zine.” So far Tommy and his cohort Nikki Marie have produced nine issues of Cheapzine, with issue 10 likely to be the last for the time being due to their new projects. Just like Amelia’s Magazine, it seems that 10, not 3, really is the magic number.

Tommy is hoping to publish 500 copies of this limited edition book sometime towards the end of summer. Whether you’re a photographer, illustrator or designer, this will be an ideal place to get your work seen, and who doesn’t love a bit of Art Nouveou, really? The deadline is 31st March 2010 and all work should be sent to cheap-magazine@live.com
It’s probably safe to say that no one would ever expect to see a pair of Scholl shoes being paraded down a catwalk, pharm although a few years back you’d never expect them to be talked up on a fashion blog either. The brand name – famed for being kind to feet - conjures visions of foot pumices, blister pads and ‘comfy shoes’ that an older woman would wear. But after a recent collaboration with Italian shoe designer, Alberto Del Biondi, the Scholl brand has been rejuvenated with the SS10 collection being refreshingly current and inspiring.

Fara - Coral - £70Images throughout courtesy of Scholl. ‘Fara’ shoe pictured.

Moving away, but not forgetting, the reputation of Scholl as a brand which promotes comfortable, modest footwear, the new collection is flambouyant, seeing the brand become much more adventurous, fun and confident in their design. Expect flat pumps with a flamboyant cuff around the ankle, colourful cork wedges, and not leaving their original principles behind – work-to-evening shoes which complete with ‘sensible’ heels and aren’t too outrageously trendy for the office.

Fauno - White - £60‘Fauno’ shoe pictured.

Focusing on fashion forward styles, the results are fresh and contemporary, yet the iconic Scholl buckle remains in place, at the forefront of the shoe reinforcing their trademark comfort and practicality factor. In the women’s collection, the finest textiles are used, from soft powder to more intense and metallic leathers. It’s sophisticated, modern yet practical, perfect for women on the go, which Scholl prides itself on.

Bimini - Purple - £35The classic model, ‘Bimimi’ (pictured above) has taken on some of the changes that this collection has demonstrated with a vivid purple that is modern, refreshing and feminine. Whilst the ‘Bahama’ design comes in gold and coral; two classic colours for holiday wear and aptly tie in with the Island themed names which they boast.

Saida - Sand - £50

Possibly the most drastic alteration, has been the addition of the Gladiator sandal, ‘Saida’ (pictured above); a staple item in every trend conscious woman’s summer wardrobe. Not only is it surprisingly stylish, but it incorporates Scholl’s promise to keep our feet comfortable and fresh with new ‘Bioprint’ technology which uses cork for a super-flexible foot bed, improving foot posture, and correcting back stiffness as a result, allowing the foot to sit in the correct anatomical position. Scholl hasn’t stopped here with its new technology, however. ‘Gelactiv’ – in the form of a shock absorbing pad built into the heel of the shoe – cushions and protects the foot whilst reviving tired legs and promises to retains its shape throughout continuous wear.

Sisi - Coral - £70‘Sisi’ shoe pictured.

The collection also boasts footwear for men with a selection of vintage look, oiled leather shoes which as to be expected, boast the Scholl buckle too. The Scholl brand has successfully moved with the times and satiated our ever changing thirst for trends and fashion. With more than a century of design success and the maintenance of a policy which always wants the best for our tired feet, this new collection opens a new door for the brand. Even if the change is not here for the future and-ever-and-ever, its revamp has certainly caught the attention of the fashion industry!

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2 Responses to “Scholl you believe it!”

  1. Catherine says:

    Prior to Scholl’s current reinvention courtesy of chic design collaboration, I remember the days of the metallic classic Scholl wooden low heeled mule that could be bought for a snip in Italian and Spanish pharmacies and bred something of a trend in Portobello about a decade ago.
    Am loving the ‘Fara’, not so sure about the orthopaedic gladiator though..

  2. Amelia says:

    Scholl has so much great history, and is such an iconic UK brand. Thanks very much for your comment.

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