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Top 25 Art Blog - Creative Tourist

London Fashion Week S/S 2011 Exhibition Review: Satoshi Date

Ethical designer Satoshi Date stunned me with his delicately produced designs, hung as an installation in an archway on Holyrood Street near London Bridge.

Written by Amelia Gregory


Illustration by Gareth A. Hopkins

As I have found with all the Portico Rooms shows, what is ed prostate they never start on time. I arrived too early again but on this occasion, this had the pleasure of watching Blanken being interviewed outside on the balcony, and the models (slightly last minute?!) being taught the walk timings.

I have always been a fan of Christian Blanken’s sport luxe approach to fashion – before this weird jogging bottoms with heels trend came along, I thought him very clever to be able to make casual(ish) clothes look very special. However, therein lies the problem – its still just very sports luxe. He followed the trend this season of sticking to neutral and block colours – white, grey, black and the occasional gold lame looking dress or top. Favourite pieces for me included the floor length white dress with silver edging, and all the gold spangly numbers.


Illustration by Gareth A. Hopkins

True to form, innovative and technologically advanced fabrics featured at the forefront of his designs. Using inspiration from 1920s and 1930s (although I couldn’t see it) and designer Claire McCardell (famed for clean, functional designs), I feel that the collection played it very safe. His signature clean lines, and the mixture of luxury fabrics and textures with a sportsy feel are all there, but nothing earth shattering.





Interestingly, for ‘Nine’ he included three of Britain’s most prominent Olympic hopefuls – Jodie Williams, Tasha Danvers and Vicki Barr who all did a sterling job at modeling the clothes.


All photography by Amelia Gregory

To be honest, I am slightly disappointed. I expected more from the designer. As you can see from the photograph above, it was a very neutral colour scheme with the odd pair of black sequinned leggings (I like very much) and gold lame dresses/playsuits.

The stains which myself and others in the front row noticed on some of the clothes, and the typos in the press release didn’t help.


Illustration by Gareth A. Hopkins

As I have found with all the Portico Rooms shows, viagra dosage they never start on time. I arrived too early again but on this occasion, thumb had the pleasure of watching Blanken being interviewed outside on the balcony, and the models (slightly last minute?!) being taught the walk timings.

I have always been a fan of Christian Blanken’s sport luxe approach to fashion – before this weird jogging bottoms with heels trend came along, I thought him very clever to be able to make casual(ish) clothes look very special. However, therein lies the problem – its still just very sports luxe. He followed the trend this season of sticking to neutral and block colours – white, grey, black and the occasional gold lame looking dress or top. Favourite pieces for me included the floor length white dress with silver edging, and all the gold spangly numbers.


Illustration by Gareth A. Hopkins

True to form, innovative and technologically advanced fabrics featured at the forefront of his designs. Using inspiration from 1920s and 1930s (although I couldn’t see it) and designer Claire McCardell (famed for clean, functional designs), I feel that the collection played it very safe. His signature clean lines, and the mixture of luxury fabrics and textures with a sportsy feel are all there, but nothing earth shattering.





Interestingly, for ‘Nine’ he included three of Britain’s most prominent Olympic hopefuls – Jodie Williams, Tasha Danvers and Vicki Barr who all did a sterling job at modeling the clothes.


All photography by Amelia Gregory

To be honest, I am slightly disappointed. I expected more from the designer. As you can see from the photograph above, it was a very neutral colour scheme with the odd pair of black sequinned leggings (I like very much) and gold lame dresses/playsuits.

The stains which myself and others in the front row noticed on some of the clothes, and the typos in the press release didn’t help.


Illustration by Gareth A. Hopkins

As I have found with all the Portico Rooms shows, information pills they never start on time. I arrived too early again but on this occasion, had the pleasure of watching Blanken being interviewed outside on the balcony, and the models (slightly last minute?!) being taught the walk timings.

Christian Blanken’s sport luxe approach to fashion has always intrigued me – before this weird jogging bottoms with heels trend came along, I thought him very clever to be able to make casual(ish) clothes look very special. However, therein lies the problem – its still just very sports luxe. He followed the trend this season of sticking to neutral and block colours – white, grey, black and the occasional gold lame looking dress or top. Favourite pieces for me included the floor length white dress with silver edging, and all the gold spangly numbers.


Illustration by Gareth A. Hopkins

True to form, innovative and technologically advanced fabrics featured at the forefront of his designs. Using inspiration from 1920s and 1930s (although I couldn’t see it) and designer Claire McCardell (famed for clean, functional designs), I feel that the collection played it very safe. His signature clean lines, and the mixture of luxury fabrics and textures with a sportsy feel are all there, but nothing earth shattering.





Interestingly, for ‘Nine’ he included three of Britain’s most prominent Olympic hopefuls – Jodie Williams, Tasha Danvers and Vicki Barr who all did a sterling job at modeling the clothes.


All photography by Amelia Gregory

To be honest, I am slightly disappointed. I expected more from the designer. As you can see from the photograph above, it was a very neutral colour scheme with the odd pair of black sequinned leggings (I like very much) and gold lame dresses/playsuits.

The stains which myself and others in the front row noticed on some of the clothes, and the typos in the press release didn’t help.

LFW satoshi date by genie spinosa
Satoshi Date by Genie Espinosa.

On Sunday evening I decided to head down to London Bridge for my last stop of the day, check an installation by Japanese designer Satoshi Date. It was held in a musty arch near the railway station, sildenafil atmospherically lit with beautifully crafted lanterns and echoing to the sounds of Satoshi’s very own voice in music. For Satoshi is an artist maker who fuses fine art, price clothes making, musicianship and sculpture – all with the help of a large team of devoted fans. When asked what attracts them I was told that it’s not only Satoshi’s obvious talents that draws them in, but the fact that he’s really funny. Always helps!

Satoshi Date SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Satoshi Date SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Satoshi Date SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Satoshi Date SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
All photography by Amelia Gregory.

There was a hushed silence when I entered and ten minutes later his partner and PR maestro Sarah Ashwell had plucked up the courage to ask where I had come from – they clearly hadn’t taken me for a fashionista, a not un-rare occurrence it has to be said. By this time I had had a good chance to take in the beautiful intricacy of the clothes hanging like refined art pieces from tangled skeins of yarn. Sarah is a craftsperson too and she has made much of the clothing that completes the new Satoshi Date collection, helping Satoshi to translate his ideas into reality.

Satoshi Date SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Satoshi Date SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Satoshi Date SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
LFW satoshi date by genie spinosa
Satoshi Date by Genie Espinosa.

Ethics are important to Satoshi, who states in his press brief that “In our capitalist society consumers rarely consider the consequences of their bargain shoes, or whether it is actually possible to fairly produce a jacket with a £15 price tag.” It’s a rare person indeed who works in the fashion industry and dares to utter the C word. I mean, I bandy it around all the time, but the cogs that keep the wheels of fashion turning are so well and truly oiled by our current capitalist global economy that it can seem hard to see how we break free. “The Satoshi Date philosophy does not end with the sale of the garment, rather it continues on its mission of inspiring people to think more, care more, be more creative and be more accountable, thus trying to diminish the negative impact that fashion so often has on the environment.” These are admirable aims, and Satoshi dreams of a future where his garments are mass produced by “fairly treated and fully appreciated skilled workers in decent conditions.” For now most are one offs, and he is extremely careful how he sources the materials.

Satoshi Date SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Satoshi Date SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Satoshi Date SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory

All fabric are organic and naturally dyed by hand, and Satoshi tries to keep waste to a minimum by creating smaller pieces from offcuts. He creates necklaces out of felted wool, tangles old computer cables and reshapes old guitar strings into colourful architectural necklaces.

Satoshi Date SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Satoshi Date SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Satoshi Date SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Satoshi Date SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
LFW satoshi date by genie spinosa
Satoshi Date by Genie Espinosa.

More experimental pieces are interspersed with clearly saleable items, and unsurprisingly Satoshi already has a series of stockists in his homeland. Back here in the UK we really really need to nurture more designers like Satoshi Date: expect to find him profiled in my upcoming Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration (which will have an ethical slant, of course).

Satoshi Date SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Satoshi Date SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Satoshi Date SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Satoshi Date SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Satoshi Date SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Here’s Satoshi Date…

Satoshi Date SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
and just some of his team…

This soft, understated kind of clothing isn’t really my personal style, but although I would wear very little of it myself I can appreciate the beautiful craftsmanship – I particularly liked the way that fabrics have been rewoven and re-imagined, and the jewellery was right up my street: I even treated myself to a pair of swinging felted ball earrings. Let’s hope my moths don’t find them.

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2 Responses to “London Fashion Week S/S 2011 Exhibition Review: Satoshi Date”

  1. Joana says:

    Beautiful stuff!

  2. Stephanie says:

    Satoshi Date is really talented – he will go very far very fast! I really like his style.

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