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Top 25 Art Blog - Creative Tourist

London Fashion Week A/W 2011 Catwalk Review: Bryce Aime

For Militarium Bryce Aime showed a blend of body con and futuristic tailoring at On/Off on Saturday 19th February 2011. My favourite part? Most definitely the fabulous handbags in collaboration with Bracher Emden.

Written by Amelia Gregory

Christopher Beales A/W 2011 by Hazel Castle
Christopher Beales A/W 2011 by Maria Papadimitriou
Christopher Beales A/W 2011 by Maria Papadimitriou.

Christopher Beales has been working at the coal face of fashion for his entire career thus far, order in places as diverse as Voyage (the bizarre hippyluxe shop that you had to be a member of to even enter) and for Primark. He’s worked for Alexander McQueen and Matthew Williamson, as a costume designer for films such as Harry Potter and Robin Hood, and he’s dressed eccentric individuals such as Prince.

Christopher Beales LFW A/W 2011- Photography by Amelia GregoryChristopher Beales LFW A/W 2011- Photography by Amelia Gregory
Christopher Beales A/W 2011 by Toni Bowater
Christopher Beales A/W 2011 by Toni Bowater.

On Friday evening I popped along to his A/W 2011 presentation When The Crystal Crack’d, which was conveniently held in the Rag Factory off Brick Lane – thereby ensuring a steady stream of inquisitive fashionistas who were no doubt heading home to their East London nests after a long first day of shows.

Christopher Beales LFW A/W 2011- Photography by Amelia GregoryChristopher Beales LFW A/W 2011- Photography by Amelia GregoryChristopher Beales LFW A/W 2011- Photography by Amelia Gregory
Christopher Beales A/W 2011 by Toni Bowater
Christopher Beales A/W 2011 by Toni Bowater.

Arranged on a sculptural arrangement of silver mesh mannequins, themselves constructed by Christopher Beales, this was a stunning debut for LFW: low key but very clever in its presentation. When The Crystal Crack’d is a collection of cocktail and evening dresses that features the precision tailoring that Christopher has perfected over many years of pattern cutting for famous names. Based on lots of asymmetric shapes in pastel and metallic silk, my favourite bit of the collection was most definitely in the details. Unexpected bows held aloft draped fabric, metal spikes accentuated the subtle curve of an exposed back and knobbled wool traced the contours of a waist.

Christopher Beales LFW A/W 2011- Photography by Amelia GregoryChristopher Beales LFW A/W 2011- Photography by Amelia GregoryChristopher Beales LFW A/W 2011- Photography by Amelia GregoryChristopher Beales LFW A/W 2011- Photography by Amelia GregoryChristopher Beales LFW A/W 2011- Photography by Amelia GregoryChristopher Beales LFW A/W 2011- Photography by Amelia GregoryChristopher Beales LFW A/W 2011- Photography by Amelia Gregory
Christopher Beales LFW A/W 2011. All photography by Amelia Gregory.

I look forward to seeing what next season will bring.
Christopher Beales A/W 2011 by Maria Papadimitriou
Christopher Beales A/W 2011 by Maria Papadimitriou.

Christopher Beales has been working at the coal face of fashion for his entire career thus far, page in places as diverse as Voyage (the bizarre hippyluxe shop that you had to be a member of to even enter) and for Primark. He’s worked for Alexander McQueen and Matthew Williamson, sick as a costume designer for films such as Harry Potter and Robin Hood, website and he’s dressed eccentric individuals such as Prince.

Christopher Beales A/W 2011 by Hazel Castle
Christopher Beales A/W 2011 by Hazel Castle.

Christopher Beales LFW A/W 2011- Photography by Amelia GregoryChristopher Beales LFW A/W 2011- Photography by Amelia Gregory
Christopher Beales A/W 2011 by Toni Bowater
Christopher Beales A/W 2011 by Toni Bowater.

On Friday evening I popped along to his A/W 2011 presentation When The Crystal Crack’d, which was conveniently held in the Rag Factory off Brick Lane – thereby ensuring a steady stream of inquisitive fashionistas who were no doubt heading home to their East London nests after a long first day of shows.

Christopher Beales LFW A/W 2011- Photography by Amelia GregoryChristopher Beales LFW A/W 2011- Photography by Amelia GregoryChristopher Beales LFW A/W 2011- Photography by Amelia Gregory
Christopher Beales A/W 2011 by Toni Bowater
Christopher Beales A/W 2011 by Toni Bowater.

Arranged on a sculptural arrangement of silver mesh mannequins, themselves constructed by Christopher Beales, this was a stunning debut for LFW: low key but very clever in its presentation. When The Crystal Crack’d is a collection of cocktail and evening dresses that features the precision tailoring that Christopher has perfected over many years of pattern cutting for famous names. Based on lots of asymmetric shapes in pastel and metallic silk, my favourite bit of the collection was most definitely in the details. Unexpected bows held aloft draped fabric, metal spikes accentuated the subtle curve of an exposed back and knobbled wool traced the contours of a waist.

Christopher Beales A/W 2011 by Hazel Castle
Christopher Beales A/W 2011 by Hazel Castle.

Christopher Beales LFW A/W 2011- Photography by Amelia GregoryChristopher Beales LFW A/W 2011- Photography by Amelia GregoryChristopher Beales LFW A/W 2011- Photography by Amelia GregoryChristopher Beales LFW A/W 2011- Photography by Amelia GregoryChristopher Beales LFW A/W 2011- Photography by Amelia GregoryChristopher Beales LFW A/W 2011- Photography by Amelia GregoryChristopher Beales LFW A/W 2011- Photography by Amelia Gregory
Christopher Beales LFW A/W 2011. All photography by Amelia Gregory.

I look forward to seeing what next season will bring.
Bryce Aime A/W 2011 by Rebecca Strickson
Bryce Aime A/W 2011 by Rebecca Strickson.

Bryce Aime: a man not afraid to experiment with scale, order volume and angular surfaces in clothing. I missed his show last season but I certainly enjoyed the theatricality of his Egyptian inspired collection a year ago.

Bryce Aime A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Bryce Aime A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Bryce Aime A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Bryce Aime A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Bryce Aime A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Bryce Aime A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Bryce Aime A/W 2011 by Sandra Contreras
Bryce Aime A/W 2011 by Sandra Contreras.

Unfortunately we were offered just the one ticket, information pills and a pretty duff seat at that. Given the lack of options I did very well to find a spot from which I could take decent photos of the models as they were propelled onto the catwalk, the LED screen at On/Off providing a futuristic slither of abstract background which worked especially well with the Bryce Aime aesthetic, always modern and angular.

Bryce Aime A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Bryce Aime A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Bryce Aime A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Bryce Aime A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Bryce Aime A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Bryce Aime A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Bryce Aime A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Bryce Aime A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Bryce Aime A/W 2011 by Sandra Contreras
Bryce Aime A/W 2011 by Sandra Contreras.

In shiny shiny fabrics combined with light absorbing wools and leather Militarium was a mix of body con stretch and uber slick tailoring. Unfortunately ink splurge stretchy leggings did not exactly work too well on the bony legs of the models, who sported a selection of serious camel toe action. Despite the very masculine up and down nature of the tailored jackets this felt like a collection that would have better suited a bodaciously curvy creature.

Bryce Aime A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Bryce Aime A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Bryce Aime A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Bryce Aime A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Bryce Aime A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Bryce Aime A/W 2011 by Sandra Contreras
Bryce Aime A/W 2011 by Sandra Contreras.

Occasionally a model swerved onto the catwalk sporting a giant geometric head mask, but I was more taken by a fetching range of matching handbags that have been created in collaboration with bag designer Bracher Emden, whose handiwork I admired up close on the On/Off stands. SO WANT ONE. Particularly the seriously 80s cross body version.

Bryce Aime A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Bryce Aime A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Bryce Aime A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.
Bryce Aime A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.

Bryce Aime is known for ending on an outfit that would better suit an outre pop star rather than a normal member of the buying public. This time it was the headwear that he extended into an entire dress… sheeny shiny, an oily print glistening over its surface. A great great showpiece – and just the ticket to shift those very desirable handbags, which were undoubtedly my favourite part of this show.

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