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Top 25 Art Blog - Creative Tourist

Royal College of Art Show One 2010: Photography and Printmaking

Show One at the RCA throws up an unlikely mix of Climate Rush inspired lithographs, monsters in ballet shoes and kitchen implements designed to produce screenprints.

Written by Amelia Gregory

aniela-murphy_yeslab
Illustration by Aniela Murphy/NeltonMandelton.

The Yes Men began when founders Mike and Andy received an invitation intended for the director-general of the World Trade Organisation – via their fake WTO website – to attend a gala event. They emailed Michael Moore to take the invite up, unhealthy approved but when a reply was not forthcoming went themselves, and thus their legendary actions began. Now they’re looking to spread the joy of their ‘Yes-tivism’ with the creation of the Yes Lab project to train others in their headline-provoking methods. Though they deplore the media, drowning us in “fake information, spun by those who follow the profit motive in order to sell us on crazy ideas that we all sort of believe even though we know better,” they believe that HEADLINES MATTER when they’re used to tell the truth. Well. Not the truth. The version of reality so completely opposite to the truth that the truth is forced to come out of hiding and wave its pale head above the parapet. Ironically, they’ve recently been accused of “devaluing information, making it hard to tell what is real from what is fake.” Because the mainstream media is the bastion of truth and objective reporting. Yeah, right.

The Yes Men defend their devious behaviour by saying that it’s needed to achieve “a condition of honesty”. When they interrupt meetings and conferences to highlight the failed logic of the free market they push their actions to the most “sinister, corrupt and disgusting” lengths to force people to confront their own twisted morals. To then have audiences simply agree has taught them just how much needs to be done. So, after twelve years of faux-press releases, bumbling around in Survivaballs and campaigning continuously against Dow on behalf of Bhopal, the Yes Men want to get the rest of the population involved and for this they’ve instead created the Yes Lab to help activists all over the world bring our most crazed creations to life.

aniela-murphy-yesmen
Illustration by Aniela Murphy/NeltonMandelton.

The Yes Lab runs in part like the current Fix the World Challenge website, where most of Andy and Mikes’ tips and tricks are given away and you can find like-minded individuals around the world to work with, but this time the Yes Men plan to work directly with the groups and organizations who come to them, providing guidance and training, linking them up with other useful people and checking in with projects until they succeed. The aim is to provide resistance so that when Obama or Cleggeron find themselves cornered by industrial lobbyists they will be able to point out of the window, where we’ll all be camped, naturally, and say “Sorry, I can’t do what you’re asking me to do – those people won’t let me.” It’s no secret after all, that if we all get it together and push in the same direction, even under different names, the government has to listen, and change does get made. The main focus of the Yes Lab, and the Yes Men, is to pressure elected officials, companies and corporations until they make the changes we want to see happen.

With the $50,000 they hope to raise through generous donations the Yes Lab could run for an initial period of six months, with actual staff doing the leg work involved in organising the facilitation of these projects. The Yes Men aren’t just begging for money though, oh no. If you’re not already motivated to give a little after reading about the dangers of the “policies that place the rights of capital before the needs of people and the environment” and the Yes Men’s plans to “kill capitalism before it kills us… before the next generations inherit a world where hunger and violence are the norm in a rapidly fraying civilization” then perhaps a few Yes Men goodies might perk your interest. For a mere $10 you can have a sincere, if mother-scaring, thank you. $25-$100 helps clear out their office, if you fancy a heap of junk alongside copies of The Yes Men Save The World (read our review here) and the Good News edition of The New York Times. $400 is a date with Survivaball model Rocco Ferrer. $1000 for a brainstorming session. $5,000 gets you a Survivaball. $30,000, really, turns into a 2-3 day retreat in the secret catacombs of Paris, checking out underground murals, chilling out with heaps of bones if you’re into that sort of thing. (Guess I’d better start saving.)

If you can’t quite jingle that out of your sofa, then even if you only have a few minutes per day the Yes Men suggest you can make a difference. Taking the time to write to elected officials, joining protests, giving money to great organisations (ahem, cough, etc) and joining social networks to spread the word of these great organisations (cough, cough, ahem, etc) all help, so head over to the Yes Lab, sign up for the newsletter and start telling all your friends to turn over their couch cushions and drop some pennies into the Yes Men’s piggy bank. You never know, you might win a Survivaball. Then who’ll be laughing when England floods, huh? Oh wait. Yeah. No-one.

Amelia met the Yes Men last year when they came to London town. You can read all about it here. And remember to check in with the Yes Lab.

You can also follow the Yes Men on twitter. Of course.

aniela-murphy_yeslab
Illustration by Aniela Murphy/NeltonMandelton.

The Yes Men began when founders Mike and Andy received an invitation intended for the director-general of the World Trade Organisation – via their fake WTO website – to attend a gala event. They emailed Michael Moore to take the invite up, viagra but when a reply was not forthcoming went themselves, and thus their legendary actions began. Now they’re looking to spread the joy of their ‘Yes-tivism’ with the creation of the Yes Lab project to train others in their headline-provoking methods. Though they deplore the media, drowning us in “fake information, spun by those who follow the profit motive in order to sell us on crazy ideas that we all sort of believe even though we know better,” they believe that HEADLINES MATTER when they’re used to tell the truth. Well. Not the truth. The version of reality so completely opposite to the truth that the truth is forced to come out of hiding and wave its pale head above the parapet. Ironically, they’ve recently been accused of “devaluing information, making it hard to tell what is real from what is fake.” Because the mainstream media is the bastion of truth and objective reporting. Yeah, right.

The Yes Men defend their devious behaviour by saying that it’s needed to achieve “a condition of honesty”. When they interrupt meetings and conferences to highlight the failed logic of the free market they push their actions to the most “sinister, corrupt and disgusting” lengths to force people to confront their own twisted morals. To then have audiences simply agree has taught them just how much needs to be done. So, after twelve years of faux-press releases, bumbling around in Survivaballs and campaigning continuously against Dow on behalf of Bhopal, the Yes Men want to get the rest of the population involved and for this they’ve created the Yes Lab to help activists all over the world bring our most crazed creations to life.

aniela-murphy-yesmen
Illustration by Aniela Murphy/NeltonMandelton.

The Yes Lab runs in part like the current Fix the World Challenge website, where most of Andy and Mikes’ tips and tricks are given away and you can find like-minded individuals around the world to work with, but this time the Yes Men plan to work directly with the groups and organizations who come to them, providing guidance and training, linking them up with other useful people and checking in with projects until they succeed. The aim is to provide resistance so that when Obama or Cleggeron find themselves cornered by industrial lobbyists they will be able to point out of the window, where we’ll all be camped, naturally, and say “Sorry, I can’t do what you’re asking me to do – those people won’t let me.” It’s no secret after all, that if we all get it together and push in the same direction, even under different names, the government has to listen, and change does get made. The main focus of the Yes Lab, and the Yes Men, is to pressure elected officials, companies and corporations until they make the changes we want to see happen.

With the $50,000 they hope to raise through generous donations the Yes Lab could run for an initial period of six months, with actual staff doing the leg work involved in organising the facilitation of these projects. The Yes Men aren’t just begging for money though, oh no. If you’re not already motivated to give a little after reading about the dangers of the “policies that place the rights of capital before the needs of people and the environment” and the Yes Men’s plans to “kill capitalism before it kills us… before the next generations inherit a world where hunger and violence are the norm in a rapidly fraying civilization” then perhaps a few Yes Men goodies might perk your interest. For a mere $10 you can have a sincere, if mother-scaring, thank you. $25-$100 helps clear out their office, if you fancy a heap of junk alongside copies of The Yes Men Save The World (read our review here) and the Good News edition of The New York Times. $400 is a date with Survivaball model Rocco Ferrer. $1000 for a brainstorming session. $5,000 gets you a Survivaball. $30,000, really, turns into a 2-3 day retreat in the secret catacombs of Paris, checking out underground murals, chilling out with heaps of bones if you’re into that sort of thing. (Guess I’d better start saving.)

If you can’t quite jingle that out of your sofa, then even if you only have a few minutes per day the Yes Men suggest you can make a difference. Taking the time to write to elected officials, joining protests, giving money to great organisations (ahem, cough, etc) and joining social networks to spread the word of these great organisations (cough, cough, ahem, etc) all help, so head over to the Yes Lab, sign up for the newsletter and start telling all your friends to turn over their couch cushions and drop some pennies into the Yes Men’s piggy bank. You never know, you might win a Survivaball. Then who’ll be laughing when England floods, huh? Oh wait. Yeah. No-one.

Amelia met the Yes Men last year when they came to London town. You can read all about it here. And remember to check in with the Yes Lab.

You can also follow the Yes Men on twitter. Of course.

aniela-murphy_yeslab
Illustration by Aniela Murphy/NeltonMandelton.

The Yes Men began when founders Mike and Andy received an invitation intended for the director-general of the World Trade Organisation – via their fake WTO website – to attend a gala event. They emailed Michael Moore to take the invite up, there but when a reply was not forthcoming went themselves, healing and thus their legendary actions began. Now they’re looking to spread the joy of their ‘Yes-tivism’ with the creation of the Yes Lab project to train others in their headline-provoking methods. Though they deplore the media, drowning us in “fake information, spun by those who follow the profit motive in order to sell us on crazy ideas that we all sort of believe even though we know better,” they believe that HEADLINES MATTER when they’re used to tell the truth. Well. Not the truth. The version of reality so completely opposite to the truth that the truth is forced to come out of hiding and wave its pale head above the parapet. Ironically, they’ve recently been accused of “devaluing information, making it hard to tell what is real from what is fake.” Because the mainstream media is the bastion of truth and objective reporting. Yeah, right.

The Yes Men defend their devious behaviour by saying that it’s needed to achieve “a condition of honesty”. When they interrupt meetings and conferences to highlight the failed logic of the free market they push their actions to the most “sinister, corrupt and disgusting” lengths to force people to confront their own twisted morals. To then have audiences simply agree has taught them just how much needs to be done. So, after twelve years of faux-press releases, bumbling around in Survivaballs and campaigning continuously against Dow on behalf of Bhopal, the Yes Men want to get the rest of the population involved and for this they’ve created the Yes Lab to help activists all over the world bring our most crazed creations to life.

aniela-murphy-yesmen
Illustration by Aniela Murphy/NeltonMandelton.

The Yes Lab runs in part like the current Fix the World Challenge website, where most of Andy and Mikes’ tips and tricks are given away and you can find like-minded individuals around the world to work with, but this time the Yes Men plan to work directly with the groups and organizations who come to them, providing guidance and training, linking them up with other useful people and checking in with projects until they succeed. The aim is to provide resistance so that when Obama or Cleggeron find themselves cornered by industrial lobbyists they will be able to point out of the window, where we’ll all be camped, naturally, and say “Sorry, I can’t do what you’re asking me to do – those people won’t let me.” It’s no secret after all, that if we all get in together and push in the same direction, governments will eventually have to listen, and changes will happen. The main focus of the Yes Lab, and the Yes Men, is to pressure elected officials, companies and corporations until they make the changes we want to see happen.

With the $50,000 they hope to raise through generous donations the Yes Lab could run for an initial period of six months, with actual staff doing the leg work involved in organising the facilitation of these projects. The Yes Men aren’t just begging for money though, oh no. If you’re not already motivated to give a little after reading about the dangers of the “policies that place the rights of capital before the needs of people and the environment” and the Yes Men’s plans to “kill capitalism before it kills us… before the next generations inherit a world where hunger and violence are the norm in a rapidly fraying civilization” then perhaps a few Yes Men goodies might perk your interest. For a mere $10 you can have a sincere, if mother-scaring, thank you. $25-$100 helps clear out their office, if you fancy a heap of junk alongside copies of The Yes Men Save The World (read our review here) and the Good News edition of The New York Times. $400 is a date with Survivaball model Rocco Ferrer. $1000 for a brainstorming session. $5,000 gets you a Survivaball. $30,000, really, turns into a 2-3 day retreat in the secret catacombs of Paris, checking out underground murals, chilling out with heaps of bones if you’re into that sort of thing. (Guess I’d better start saving.)

If you can’t quite jingle that out of your sofa, then even if you only have a few minutes per day the Yes Men suggest you can make a difference. Taking the time to write to elected officials, joining protests, giving money to great organisations (ahem, cough, etc) and joining social networks to spread the word of these great organisations (cough, cough, ahem, etc) all help, so head over to the Yes Lab, sign up for the newsletter and start telling all your friends to turn over their couch cushions and drop some pennies into the Yes Men’s piggy bank. You never know, you might win a Survivaball. Then who’ll be laughing when England floods, huh? Oh wait. Yeah. No-one.

Amelia met the Yes Men last year when they came to London town. You can read all about it here. And remember to check in with the Yes Lab.

You can also follow the Yes Men on twitter. Of course.

RCA show 2010 entrance
Wowser! the entrance to the 2010 RCA graduate show.

The Royal College of Art has really gone to town for the graduate shows this year: there’s a huge SHOW sculpture around the entrance to the college in the same neon orange as their invite that ensures you’re not gonna miss the location if you’ve never been before.

The MA graduation shows are always a very mixed bag – the RCA lays claim to the pick of the creative crop, symptoms but despite much lauded links with the creative industries I find that many of its students still very much have their head in the clouds when it comes to producing something that will appeal to more than a few people. This morning I only had time to get around the printmaking and photography exhibitions so will leave the rest to another time, if I find it. Within the photography section I was only really moved by the work of Noemie Goudal – who had pole position right next to the free teas for press in the entrance hall stage right. Her strongest piece is Les Amants (Cascade), which shows a waterfall in a woodland artfully recreated with some draped plastic. I won’t try to paraphrase the abysmal entry in the RCA catalogue describing her work but it’s obviously a commentary on the presence of humans in nature, and I always like that kind of thing.

Noemie Goudal Les Amants (Cascade)
Les Amants (Cascade) by Noemie Goudal.

In printmaking I walked straight past the work of Cordelia Cembrowicz, though I should have seen her giant Climate Rush inspired print straight away – it’s an event I remember well. The last big Climate Rush action to inspire the masses took place in June 2009 when we organised a huge bike rush which ended with a blockade of Westminster Bridge right outside Parliament (read about it here), and the print depicts Cordelia astride the famous statue of Boudicca. It makes me sad to see work inspired by Climate Rush and these artworks feel a bit like a memorial to a certain place and time that has now passed. Still, they serve as a reminder of how much we achieved before the group (as it was then) imploded under Tamsin Omond’s drive to reach her next goal – becoming MP for the constituency of Hampstead and Kilburn as head of her own political party, To The Commons. She failed, but I’m sure she has a new plan in the pipeline.

boudicca Cordelia Cembrowicz
Boudicca (Deeds Not Words) by Cordelia Cembrowicz.

Still, our clothes and actions were always going to be ripe for artistic plundering and Cordelia (who joined us for a couple of actions) has done an admirable job of producing some wonderful lithographs inspired by photographs of various associated members of Climate Rush. I particularly love the one of Tracey – who will be well known to those who have campaigned against Heathrow in Sipson – grasping at a clutch of planes.

tracey Cordelia Cembrowicz
Tracey by Cordelia Cembrowicz.

And the print showing a crouched Brenda, fist to the sky in front of a decorative Shell rondel, is simply stunning. Just look at the detail on Brenda’s proudly displayed armpit hairs! Around her dead yellow canaries are sploshed against some psychedelic swirls; presumably inspired by our No New Coal Awards back in February 2009, *sigh* those were the days. And there’s Cadi, smoke stacks billowing out of her multiple heads on a stained glass window designed for a new look Westminster.

brenda Cordelia Cembrowicz
Brenda by Cordelia Cembrowicz.

RCA show 2010 Cadi
Detail from a stained glass window showing Cadi’s mulitple heads, by Cordelia Cembrowicz.

What a shame it all went tits up.
Moving swiftly on….

I was most intrigued by a group of tables set up with various kitchen implements and paint, but had to have the concept explained to me. In a flight of fancy the like of which you can get away with at the RCA, Helen Murgatroyd has set up her own homespun cottage printing industry utilising kitchen implements and other familiar domestic objects to create a traditional looking screenprint of a plate on a checked table cloth, rendered special by the process that produced it. She must be doing something right because she has just had her entire graduate collection bought up by Terence Conran.

RCA show 2010 Helen Murgatroyd
Part of the installation by Helen Murgatroyd.

Another printmaking graduate that caught my eye was David Orme, whose work so reminded me of Luke Best that I asked if he’d had him as a tutor. He hasn’t, but has heard the comparison before. I particularly liked his decorative use of metallic foils in a group of voyeuristic illustrations inspired by tourism, but was unable to take a decent photo. The work on his site showcases an altogether different style.

RCA show 2010 David Orme
Detail of a work by David Orme.

Next to him Olenna Mokliak showed large lithographs etchings and aquatints of weird monsters with extendable fingernails and ballet shoes. Very weird, I like a lot, but she has made the unforgivable error of not creating a website before her graduate show. Who tutors these people?! Fail!

I AM AFRAID I’VE HAD TO REMOVE THIS WORK – SEE COMMENT BELOW.
Detail of a work by RCA show 2010 Olenna Mokliak.

Downstairs my trip was curtailed still further when I bumped into a friend that I haven’t seen in over a decade. I studied fashion textiles with Philippa Wagner at the University of Brighton and she is now a top trends forecaster, living with her young family in sunny London Fields. She too was enjoying the Hackney Parks for Life festival with her kids last Saturday when a gang shot a passer by who was innocently enjoying a picnic just like us. More like Parks for Death me thinks. It was nice to catch up, albeit briefly, and I just had time to take in the work of Sun Ju Lee – stunning shadow-like prints made with great delicacy on fishing wire, almost lenticular in appearance. Unfortunately not translated well into 2D.

Sun Ju Lee RCA
A Practiced Place by Sun Ju Lee.

Part one of the RCA show continues until 6th June 2010. It’s open from 11-8 daily at the Royal College of Art, Kensington Gore, London SW7 2EU. Admission is free.

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33 Responses to “Royal College of Art Show One 2010: Photography and Printmaking”

  1. Olenna Mokliak says:

    Hello Amelia,

    I am a graduating student from The Royal College of Art. I have serious concerns regarding the article you have written for your magazine.

    The information in the article is incorrect and the tone of the article in part verges on being slanderous.

    My work is one of those featured in your article. My name is Olenna Mokliak.

    The nature of my work is etching and aquatint not lithographs as you have claimed. My website is not obsolete it is in fact under construction.

    More importantly, you have not asked the permission of any one of the artists featured from The Royal College whether they agreed to have their work photographed. This is a breach of copyright by you. I would like my images removed from your website and any false information about me removed also.

    I would appreciate a response to this concern as soon as possible.

    Olenna Mokliak MA (RCA)

  2. Amelia says:

    Hi Olenna, wow! what a response! I have put your work on my website because I really liked it, so it’s a bit of a shock to get such a nasty comment from you. All the work on here is here because I feel it is worthy of promotion. I am sorry if I have got the precise nature of your work wrong – I actually thought it looked like an etching, but when I checked in the official RCA catalogue it said your work was a lithograph – I try to get my facts right so I went with this because I wanted to get this blog live as soon as possible. I shall remove the photo in question, though I think it is a major mistake for you to write such comments on the internet. If you do have a website then please feel free to post the link under here for any interested readers to visit. Best wishes, Amelia x

  3. Olenna Mokliak says:

    Hello again,

    I am pleased to know you like my work. My statement was by no means ‘nasty’. However, the glib and insensitive tone of your article in relation to my supposed lack of website came across as an indetiement against the students and tutorage of The Royal College. We are a serious institution producing serious work and quite rightly I should feel grievance against an informally written article which misrepresents the truth.

    Kind regards,

    Olenna

  4. Sara says:

    On the topic of the photography of works of art:

    As you can see from the post, and as mentioned in the text, these aren’t super hi-res photographs of the work in its best light. They’re not catalogue images. The reason museums and galleries protect the copyright of hi-res images so fiercely is because these images allow for the reproduction of the original work on placemats, coasters, teatowels, mugs etc. It is not to protect the ‘integrity’ of a work, or the artist. Low res images, taken in situ are of no particular interest to galleries, unless there are conservation reasons for it.

    The works shown above are in the public domain, Amelia does not need permission to publish photos of them. She has been very accommodating in removing the image under dispute with out causing a fuss, since there really is no breach of copyright, only a difference of opinion.

    People who can’t tell their arses from their aquatint will look and comment upon your work. Some of it might be unfavourable. Some of it might not come from a very educated place. Some of it might be published on personal websites, such as this one. Once you create, it’s out there. It’s the hardest part of finishing an important work: letting it go!

    Oleanna, I would have liked to see your work, but since it is impossible for me to come to the show, I will now not be able to. I understand that you’ve probably been putting loads of time and effort into your final show, and creating a website might not be at the top of your agenda until it’s over. Amelia’s tone might have been flippant, but your response was very defensive, given that the ‘misrepresentation’ has been amended.

    http://blogs.walkerart.org/ecp/2010/06/02/a-commons-primer-in-62-minutes-6-seconds/

  5. Margaret Ruth says:

    In response to Oleanna
    (Whose work I actually liked)

    Ego aside please.

    When you exhibit your work, aren’t people entitled to give their opinion..??

  6. Amelia says:

    Hi Sara, thankyou very much for your comment – it’s good to hear that others don’t think I’ve done wrong in commenting on a graduate show in this way! xx

  7. Amelia says:

    Thankyou also Margaret Ruth, I appreciate your comment, x

  8. Anonymous says:

    It all depends on what audience you want to reach out to, if Oleanna doesn’t want her work commented on by Amelia’s Magazine it is completely her choice and I don’t blame her for wanting it taken down. The article illustrates Amelia’s lack of knowledge which is clearly apparent in her petty remarks. Since when did being an artist mean set up a web site and flog your work, she’s obviously oblivious. I think Amelia made some very rude and arrogant remarks in her article, maybe she should stick to writing little articles and concentrate on exploiting other artists rather than try understand the REAL world of art for which she obviously has no educated opinion on.

  9. Amelia says:

    Hi Jelly Tots, are you a friend of Oleanna by any chance? What a shame you don’t use your name! x

  10. Anonymous says:

    I’m not actually, I’m just not a fan of your self-righteous attitude.

    I thought creative types were supposed to be more open minded, obviously everyone is entitled to their opinion but to say ‘many of its students still very much have their head in the clouds’ is just a very narrow minded sweeping statement to make.

  11. Amelia says:

    Hi Jelly, that’s fine – everyone is entitled to their own opinion. And you don’t have to read mine, A x

  12. Michelle says:

    It’s very clear that this a review, and reviews are the opinion of one person – if you don’t like what somebody has written, then that’s fair enough but it’s not fair to ask them to take their content down. I think Amelia has been very nice to do this when she could have just changed it to say etchings. I’m not sure that any future employers would look favourably on your inability to take criticism… especially as Amelia said she liked your work.

  13. Abi says:

    All I can say to Oleanna and Anonymous is that if you exhibit your work, you are putting it in the public domain and it’s generally a good idea to take all comments, positive or negative in a professional way.

    If you do have a grievance or notice any errors, there are many polite phrases that are very useful in expressing these to the people concerned.

  14. Olivier says:

    “We are a serious institution producing serious work…”

    Love that line :P These responses to someone (anyone) that is promoting your work (not ripping it off as suggested) is quite an interesting approach! My opinion is that ‘serious’ attitude may not work so well with everyone you deal with in the REAL world. ;)

  15. MonkeyMagic says:

    What a fascinating glimpse into the artists of the RCA world this series of comments actually is. I found Amelia’s article interesting and was pleased to be able to see some of the work from an exhibition I was not able to attend. If you exhibit a work publicly you are placing it in the public domain, meaning you have no recourse to claim copyright infringement when someone takes a picture of your work – so long as they are not profiting from it (can you imagine Anthony Gormley running around the Angel of the North telling passing truckers to put their camera phones away?)

    As for the comment ‘[Amelia should..] try understand the REAL world of art for which she obviously has no educated opinion on’… oh dear! Because of course exhibiting art in a gallery is all about screening those who attend the gallery to ensure that they have the right level of intelligence(!)

    If you don’t want the public’s opinion on your work it’s simple, don’t exhibit it. Otherwise, take it on the chin; it’s called being a REAL artist. In the mean time, if you’re interested in being business savvy I’d recommend doing an Intellectual Property refresher course (and getting a website)

  16. wirrow says:

    ugh god i seriously hate that rca attitude. so many rca people i know r like that. even the tutors
    someone pls tell these Royally Condescending Assholes that there is no such thing as ‘the REAL art world’
    *puke*

  17. wirrow says:

    my god amelia its ETCHING not lithograph! how dare you.. such a pleb!

  18. We Are The British says:

    What a nasty, immature little student that girl. No breach of copyright has taken place and the author of this article is quite within her rights to express an opinion – it’s what happens in the real world – not that students know much abotu about.

  19. Hello everyone. I can tell you for a fact that Olenna is not a “nasty, immature little student” and maybe it’s getting a little personal. I’m sure we all act in ways at points where we could be accused of being that (well, I’m sure I do at least!), but a) it’s not really necessary, and b) it’s a little pointless as it’s completely subjective.

    I’m a really good friend of OLENNA (so am admittedly a little biased but I’m saying this from as neutral perspective as I can). I haven’t spoken to her about this, but I can guarantee that she didn’t want to start a slating match. She works SO hard, and I guess she just didn’t feel comfortable with the review, which is fair enough. Maybe it wasn’t best to deal with this on a public forum, but I, for one, really like Olenna’s art and I think you will too so you should check out her website when it’s done (and, as far as backhanded promotion goes I think you’ll definitely come away from this site with the name OLENNA MOKLIAK in your head :-) ).

    I went to the exhibition and it was really good, loads of interesting stuff, much of which is shown above. It just seems a bit of a shame to ruin it with bickering like this!

    Richard Norris.

  20. Omar says:

    I must also commend Amelia for taking the time and effort to write a review of the show which I was also unable to attend.

    As a graduate artist myself I recognise a bad attitude when I see one and I cannot help but sense a bad attitude in the case of Oleanna. She has really given herself some bad press with regard to her comments.

    This ‘serious’ world that she confesses to know as a ‘serous’ artist is telling of her inexperience and lack of critical tolerance.

    Take it from me, an artist who has had a degree of success, that you will not go far if you attempt to continue professionally with your intellectual snobbery and unwillingness to have your work promoted and talked about, whether the talk is good or bad.

    I have never met you of course, but I can say with some degree of certainty that I do not wish to.

    As my teachers said at school – “Your attitude must improve”.

    Regards,

    O/Z/B

  21. This is an interesting and very ‘readable’ article. It’s a shame that Olenna’s ego got in the way, and all I can think is that she really needs to grow up a little. She should be thanking you for including her work in your article, and quite honestly she SHOULD have a website already up-and-running by the time of her show. It shows a certain lack of professionalism.

    If I got annoyed every time someone used my work in an article without asking me first, my knickers would be so twisted I wouldn’t be able to sit down.

  22. Olenna Mokliak says:

    Hello,

    I am not comfortable with how ridiculous, out of hand and offensive this discussion has become at my expense. Nor am I comfortable with being discussed publicly on a blog and would like this to stop, I didn’t ask to be in the article in the first place and Amelia refused to remove me. It’s pretty hurtful and untrue stuff which people are writing.

    I would like to reiterate that the reason I initially commented on the blog after the exhibition was simply to make a valid point in terms of copyright law (a law which can be accessed online) It should not be assumed that just because your work is in a gallery space you want it to feature in an article. It would have been constructive to meet Amelia first and for the article itself to be more true to form. In fact, we had national newspapers who attended the exhibition in which one student featured, they asked her permission.

    In addition I was affronted by the tone of the article and the misinformation about me not having a website, which at the time was under construction and misinformation about my work added to my annoyance, but fair enough maybe I took that a bit too seriously (sleep deprivation through working so damn hard!)

    This was NOT and never would be an intentional personal attack on the writer in question, however I feel under personal attack which is unfair as what I have written has been taken out of context entirely and people are continuing to do so. As a journalist it is important to be respectful of others, I really feel that generally in life!!

    I would like to say finally, that I do feel I have made a valid point but it was never meant grudgingly, I was just making an observation. I also feel that the writer was generous in writing an article about the show which is great, however, perhaps next time, to prevent general upset things could take place in a more respectful way which benefits everyone concerned. To be asked whether you would like to be a part of an article in which your work featured would be preferable. A quick email is all it takes.

    I am not a bad person, nor nasty, I am diplomatic and it’s actually so absurd to read what people have written about me being arrogant which is a million miles from the truth! If expressing my view means being shot down in flames and accused of being a stereotypically aloof artist then that is not true anyway. People are using this as a public airing of their own ‘attitudes’ which isn’t constructive or pleasant for anyone to read. Anyone who knows me knows that I am genuine, hardworking, diplomatic, self-critical and selfless. Please for God’s sake leave me alone now and stop this public bashing. No hard feelings. In fact for those who know me and who have engaged with just discussion around work KNOW that criticism is about moving forward in a positive way so lets all move on now. Olenna’s show at the Royal College is yesterdays news.

    Thanks.

    Olenna Mokliak

  23. katie antoniou says:

    just one quick email?do you have any idea how long it would take to email every person Amelia’s magazine features?So what you’d like is for everyone to be emailed, then if they thought their work was going to be criticised they could just say they didn’t want it featured?So basically; then all press would be positive and there would be no art criticism..?I’m sorry Olenna but you obviously have NO idea how journalism works.Maybe its not your ego, but in that case I’m afraid its just ignorance.I really hope you learn from this experience if you’re going to get any exposure or have any chance of succeeding as an artist.

  24. grthink says:

    Olenna, off the back off this furore I’ve checked out your artwork online and I really like a lot of it.

    I’ll be honest, I don’t know much about how the art world works. But I do know how the internet works, and if you want a disscussion like this one to finish, you should at all costs avoid contributing to it… I mean, I wouldn’t be wading in now if it wasn’t for your last comment :)

  25. Abi says:

    Hi Oleanna,

    In terms of the ‘public bashing’ – while I’d agree there is no need for excessive personal insults in any online forum, at the same time, your initial comment was quite agressive in tone and while you may have felt that you had genuine concerns and issues with the article, if you did not want these dealt with publicly, you could have emailed Amelia directly; this is usually the best way to rectify something you’re unhappy about in private.

    By making a comment underneath the article, it opens you up to a public discussion if people do not like what you say.

    Contact details are not difficult to find on this site and it would have been as quick to have found Amelia’s contact address and stated your points in private as to have made a comment under the article and I suspect you would have been far happier with the results of a private, carefully worded email.

  26. Oliver says:

    You know you’ve written a good article when the comments contain about ten times the amount of words as the article itself!

    P.s. I use the phrase ‘ten times’ in a general sense to convey a ‘large quantity’ as opposed to a factual proportion…please don’t call me slanderous! Please!

  27. jean-claude says:

    Ive done some detective work and I think the anonymous person and richard norris are all Olenna in disguise.

    How immature and unprofessional she is! I agree with Abi, why make something personal so public.
    ~ Olenna, I think you have really put your foot in it here. You are a representative of RCA grads, grow up! The Royal College is a good art school, its so sad you’ve allowed this to be put to question. You are not going to get ANYWHERE in life with this attitude!

  28. OMG, Jean-Claude, that is the saddest comment I have every read in my life! My name is Richard Norris, my website is http://www.richardnorrismusic.com, and I am not Olenna in disguise! I’m prepared to start a public bashing about myself if this forum’s full of idiotic comments like that (which it hasn’t actually been in the main)! I can’t tell you who anonymous is, but it’s not me, and I’m sure it’s not Olenna either – she’s perfectly capable of fighting her own battles and I only wrote on this wall as I felt I wanted to say something personally, as people have been creating a blur between “professional” and “personal” assumptions!

    Thank God you’re not a real life detective :-)

  29. Jean-Claude, that is the saddest comment I have every read in my life- I think that has just lost this blog any credibility it had (though in the main it hasn’t been full of such stupid comments)! My name is Richard Norris, my website is http://www.richardnorrismusic.com, and I am not Olenna in disguise! I’m prepared to start a public bashing about myself if this forum’s full of idiotic comments like that. I can’t tell you who anonymous is, but it’s not me, and I’m sure it’s not Olenna either – she’s perfectly capable of fighting her own battles and I only wrote on this wall as I felt I wanted to say something personally, as people have been creating a blur between “professional” and “personal” assumptions!

    That type of comment really makes it feel like this is turning into a playground argument!!

    Thank God you’re not a real life detective :-)

  30. Sorry about the double edition (!!)

  31. [...] first met Cordelia a couple of months ago, after I saw her work featured in an Amelia’s Magazine article and actually screamed because I had done my undergrad dissertation on this very statue of Boadicea, [...]

  32. carly says:

    I’ve read through everything, and Amelia’s review as a whole was brilliant, it’s great to get an aside view, but I did find her comments regarding Olenna abrupt and rude. Why write ‘fail’ at the end, it seemed hurtful.

    I think amelia has every right express her thoughts but that little bit just didn’t seem very well thought out and I can understand Olenna’s reaction, and I really felt for her.

    This artist has clearly worked very hard and to actually get into the RCA is a big deal, it’s so hard to get in, so I an understand her sensitivity towards a comment by someone who has no idea about who she is and how hard she’s worked. For me I just didn’t really like how flippant the comment seemed. When you put your work out there you do also have to let it go so the whole event has been made way to big.

    What really got me was most of the comments afterwards, the lack of compassion and level of personal judgments just horrified me, not that people didn’t have a point, but to be so personal, the girl made a big mistake writing anything directly back and not sending Amelia private message was not a good move, I wish I could take that comment out for her, massive mistake, but that’s all, a mistake, to leave such brutal messages i find upsetting as it says a lot about what kind of society we are living in and how quickly we send someone to the slaughter.

    Olenna’s message was reactive and defensive but haven’t we all behaved in that way at times? It’s usually because we have felt hurt, we aren’t as unique as we like to think we are, we’ve all been Olenna at some point. She made mistake, we’ve all made mistakesthat’s for sure, but be so damning is not necessary. The level of personal attack is awful. If everyone was just enjoying following there own path then we wouldn’t have so much bitterness like i’ve seen on this blog, not everyone’s comments of cours,e and i’ve seen some helpful criticism too!

    Just for the record i don’t know anyone on this site, i was researching the RCA on google and came across this page, which as a whole i love.

    Some comments lacked any compassion, and that was very sad to see.

  33. rca grad says:

    as a graduate of the RCA myself, it’s nice to see a bit of humour in the review. has a bit of a negative edge but good to see someone no taking the place uber-seriously.

    that place definitely needs to lighten up!!

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