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Top 25 Art Blog - Creative Tourist

LFW 09 – Fashion Scout – Ones to Watch

London 2009

Written by Sabrina Morrison

pamelia-kurstin1

Monday 12 October, medications Pamelia Kurstin/Pete Drungle, pharmacy Café Oto

Theremin viruoso, pill Pamelia Kurstin teams up with award-winning composer, pianist, multi-instrumentalist and producer Pete Drungle in this premier live performance in a lovely Dalston setting. Kurstin creates layer-upon-layer of exotic otherworldly noises and haunting improvised melodies, with an almost operatic, voice-like quality. A sound to behold!

Tuesday 13th October, Alan Pownall, Pure Groove

This guy looks set to be the next young Londoner to make it big. All the credentials are there; signed to Young & Lost, backup by Adele, DJ support provided by Laura Marling, has opened for Florence & the Machine and he does a blinding cover of Beyonce’s Singles Ladies, above. Not to name drop or anything.

rumble-strips

Wednesday 14th October, David Gest, Hammersmith Apollo

This is so bizarre, that it’s got Amelia’s Magazine’s backing. Weirdo Gest hosts an evening of acts including classic soul and R&B singer, Ben E ‘Stand By Me’ King, free newspaper pin-up Peter Doherty and indie boys, The Rumble Strips, above. You couldn’t make this stuff up.

micachu

Thursday 15th October, Micachu, Scala

Guildhall-trained Micachu triumphantly brings her alt.pop grime-y electro self along with The London Sinfonietta on the tour of her dazzlingly inventive debut album, ‘Jewellery.’ Support comes from fellow sonic pioneers and Mercury music prize nominated, The Invisible.

TheSlits

Friday 16th October, The Slits, ULU

Amelia’s Magazine are overjoyed to have the original female punk band back – read the album review here – and think this gig will be unmissable. Support is in the form of chaotic, darkwave pop from former Test-Icicles man Rory Brattwell’s new band Kasms and instrument-swapping, all-gal group Pens.

Peta Webb & Ken Hall

Saturday 17th October, Kit & Cutter, The Deptford Arms

Venture to the South East and you will experience the most unique night out of your life. Playing at this ramshackle folk night are north London husband-and-wife duo Webb and Hall singing unaccompanied traditional Irish and American songs presented in a warm and beguiling way, ably assisted by folk activist and banjo player Hicks.

rubella

Sunday 18th October, Oxjam, New Cross Inn

Staying South East, why not pay your dues to Oxjam and check out Rubella, punky girl rockers fond of dressing in school along with riffy alt.rockers We The Faceless and pop-punkers Stick Man Army. That’ll round your gigging week off nicely.

pamelia-kurstin1

Monday 12 October, website Pamelia Kurstin/Pete Drungle, Café Oto

Theremin viruoso, Pamelia Kurstin teams up with award-winning composer, pianist, multi-instrumentalist and producer Pete Drungle in this premier live performance in a lovely Dalston setting. Kurstin creates layer-upon-layer of exotic otherworldly noises and haunting improvised melodies, with an almost operatic, voice-like quality. A sound to behold!

Tuesday 13th October, Alan Pownall, Pure Groove

This guy looks set to be the next young Londoner to make it big. All the credentials are there; signed to Young & Lost, backed by Adele, DJ support provided by Laura Marling, has opened for Florence & the Machine and he does a blinding cover of Beyonce’s Singles Ladies, above. Not to name drop or anything.

rumble-strips

Wednesday 14th October, David Gest, Hammersmith Apollo

This is so bizarre, that it’s got Amelia’s Magazine’s backing. Weirdo Gest hosts an evening of music including classic soul and R&B singer, Ben E ‘Stand By Me’ King, free newspaper pin-up Peter Doherty and indie boys, The Rumble Strips, above. You couldn’t make this stuff up.

micachu

Thursday 15th October, Micachu and the Shapes, Scala

Guildhall-trained Micachu triumphantly brings her alt.pop grime-y electro self along with The London Sinfonietta on the tour of her dazzlingly inventive debut album, ‘Jewellery.’ Support comes from fellow sonic pioneers and Mercury music prize nominated, The Invisible.

TheSlits

Friday 16th October, The Slits, ULU

Amelia’s Magazine are overjoyed to have the original female punk band back on our stereos – read the album review here – and think this gig will be unmissable. Support is in the form of chaotic, darkwave pop from former Test Icicles man Rory Brattwell’s new band Kasms and instrument-swapping, all-gal group Pens.

Peta Webb & Ken Hall

Saturday 17th October, Kit & Cutter, The Deptford Arms

Venture to this South East and you will experience the most unique night out of your life. Playing at this ramshackle folk night are north London husband-and-wife duo Peta Webb and Ken Hall singing unaccompanied traditional Irish and American songs presented in a warm and beguiling way, ably assisted by folk activist and banjo player Ed Hicks.

rubella

Sunday 18th October, Oxjam, New Cross Inn

Staying South East, why not pay your dues to Oxjam and check out Rubella, punky girl rockers fond of dressing in school uniform, along with riffy alt.rockers We The Faceless and pop-punkers Stick Man Army. That’ll round your gigging week off nicely.

x lion tamer 2

Under the name of X-Lion Tamer, case Edinburgh-based artist, visit web Tony Taylor, likes to create 80s-tinged pop songs about romance, friendship and, eh, suicide. He once said his music sounds like, ‘the ending credits of low budget 80s teen movies – played on your mate’s Amiga’. A bit like a John Hughes film, if Erasure and Junior Boys had been asked to do the music. I met up with him in a Swedish bar to talk pop.

What type of music would you say you make?

I say it’s pop. Other people sometimes call it electro, or electro pop, or dance or synthpop, but I think it’s straight pop. I just happen to use electronic instruments when I play.

What do you think makes a good pop song?

There are two types really, aren’t there? There’s the love songs; the ones that say ‘I love you’, ‘I have loved you’, or ‘I want to love you’, then there’s the songs that want you to get down to, get funky. Something like ‘Holiday’ by Madonna – it’s exactly that. It’s a naked, fun time, party record. I try to make party records that have a sense of loss or emotion to them.

x lion tamer sneaky petes

Madonna is one of your favourite artists. Who else do you like?

Erasure, Yazoo, Cyndi Lauper – I like clean sounds, and I tend to like stuff with that 80s analogue synth vibe to it. I like to pick from lots of genres though. I’m just as happy to listen to old Belinda Carlisle as the new Fuck Buttons 7”. I take influences from all kinds of music – stuff you’d hear in clubs, soundtracks to 80s movies, Burt Bacharach… There’s no such thing as a guilty pleasure; you either like something or you don’t.

What about your lyrics? Although you call them party records, ‘Neon Hearts’ is about feeling empty inside, ‘Life Support Machine’ is about suicide letters, and ‘I Said Stop’ is about a bad break-up.

I like the idea of making melodically driven pop music, that sounds quite melancholy, but is uplifting at the same time. Music can be immediate and catchy, but that doesn’t mean it can’t have any depth. I like big hooks, and big melodies that will stick in your head, but I try to combine them with lyrics that aren’t throwaway. I love British music’s ability to do that. People like The Smiths, The Auteurs or Hefner, they all do stuff that sounds quite joyful on the surface, but underneath it’s quite heartfelt.

So do you think British pop and say, American pop, are very different?

A lot of British pop is very kitchen sink. It’s not necessarily positive, and it really focuses on the day to day stuff. It’s just some guy who’s sitting in his flat feeling miserable. The American stuff often feels more widescreen, it makes you think of rolling prairies and wide open spaces.

Tony Taylor

And you prefer the British approach?

Yeah, I like down to earth lyrics, but then giving them a bit of glamour with some electro and pop sounds. I also try to avoid earnestness. I hate that in music.

You seem to be building up a good following in Scotland now. You’ve come a long way from that gig you did last year in a pub where you spilled a pint over your laptop during your first song…

Yeah. That was embarrassing. [laughs] But actually it was probably the best thing I ever did. I ended up claiming a better laptop through my insurance. So, career wise it was pretty clever.

Neon Hearts is on sale at Rough Trade, Avalanche (Scotland), iTunes, eMusic through 17 Seconds Records.
Zanditon 2 red bl

Fashion Scout now in its seventh year, try has once again brought us a well balanced diet of young innovators and box-fresh talent.

Ones To Watch provided a menu of gothic grandeur, visit this tea stained Venuses, beaded suits and eco constructivism.

The designers coralled for this presentation are Serbian Marko Mitanovski, celebrity autopsy inspired Hermione DePaula, CSM grad Dean Quinn and Ada Zanditon.

MMitanovski3

The ancient Serbian forests and dark folkloric characters provided a bottomless source of imagery for Marko Mitanovski’s black leather creations.

The slow pace of the models allowed for detailed gazing at the leather laces crowned with furry antlers. The designs were reminiscent of Ebony tree nymphs crossed with the witch whose poisoned apple sent Snow White to slumberland.

MMitanovski2

According to Mitanovski the outfits were the result of a 15 strong studio team who ruched, beaded and laced scaled-up versions of Elizabethan collars shaping them into skirts, capes and collars.

Vintage beauty stylists from Nina’s Hair Parlour wrapped the life-size foam antlers in hair, elevating the looks to showpiece status. Mitanovski kept the production of the designs local by sourcing materials from local manufacturers and having his accessories, shoes and bags produced in Belgrade.

The performance was set to the sounds of (his favorite) a Nirvana track, reworked by his friends’ quartet.

HDePaula3

HDePaula2

A sweet compliment to Mitanovski’s rich palette was Hermione DePaula’s hand painted chiffon washes in nude, caramel and ivories. The body was displayed through delicate shapes created by frayed and tightly clustered burgundy chiffon collars over bodysuits and billowing trousers.

HDePaula3

The pieces possessed a sensual magnetism that appears in accordance to the inspiration for the collection. DePaula started by looking atthe ultra realistic life-sized wax models used in the teaching of medicine. These dolls were often made with real hair and wore ornamental jewellery, DePaula was inspired by these wax “Venus’ multi-colored interior with removable parts that reveal the mystery of the inner workings of the female body.” The idea was taken a step further by dubbing the collection “Las Venus” in a nod to tabloid fascination with celebrity.

Quinn1

Dean Quinn, whom we spotted at CSM’s BA show this spring brought his graduate collection of Blade Runner inspired beaded suits ( i implore you to fight the urge to think of Elvis onesies right now) in film noir blacks and whites.

Sharp satin suits with the occasional exaggerated shoulder were detailed with domino tracks of beads. The porcupine beads were, as much great art is, an accident of miscalculation. When threaded too tight the little beads are forced to stand on end. A delicate thing to control but a great effect.

Quinn2

Wildcard designer Ada Zanditon produced haexagons in a geometric bleu blanc rouge of cocoon coats, high waisted trousers and cropped tops. Her beehive inspired collection carried the theme through heavy cottons, silks and folded organza petals.

zanditon 1

The conceptual designs are not surprising, considering that Ada Zanditon has previously worked for Alexander McQueen and Gareth Pugh. However Zanditon remains steadfast in the eco couture ring (see Amelia’s Magazine coverage of The Ethical Fashion Fair in Paris for details on Zanditon’s commitment to sustainable fashion).

zanditon 2 bl

Check out Amelia’s Magazine April 09 interview with Ada

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